Culture In Which People Seek Knowledge Through Science

Culture in which people seek knowledge through science.

A scientific culture is one in which individuals seek knowledge via scientific inquiry. In response to a question asked 338 days ago on February 10, 2021 at 9:15:46 PM Updated 338 days ago at 11:57:42 a.m. on February 11, 2021 1 response or comment a culture in which individuals seek knowledge through scientific investigation Senate culture is a term used to describe a society in which individuals seek knowledge via scientific inquiry. Score 1User:Upgrading selected neighborhoods in order to get people from the middle and higher classes to relocate to these areas.

Score 1User:Which of the following does not have an effect on the growth of a population?

the birth rate b.

the exchange rate d.

  1. The size of a population is not affected by the exchange rate of Weegy.
  2. Prejudice, discrimination, and trouble obtaining meaningful job are some of the issues that have been raised.
  3. All of the issues mentioned above – prejudice, discrimination, and trouble obtaining meaningful job – are obstacles that Americans with disabilities must overcome.
  4. Please choose the most appropriate response from the options offered.
  5. Updated 338 days ago at 11:57:42 a.m.
  6. TRUE.

When Scientists “Discover” What Indigenous People Have Known For Centuries

A team of researchers in northern Australia has discovered kites and falcons, dubbed “firehawks,” that are purposefully carrying flaming sticks in order to spread fire: Just one example of how western science is now catching up to Indigenous Traditional Knowledge. Over the last 50 years, our understanding of what animals do when people aren’t around has progressively expanded. Examples include the discovery that animals employ tools in their regular activities. Octopi carry coconut shell halves to serve as homes later in their lives, whereas chimps utilize twigs to fish for termites.

However, the most recent revelation has elevated this evaluation to dizzying new heights—literally.

The fact that birds would intervene to spread fire to previously unburned areas is astounding.

As a result, it should come as no surprise that this work has gotten a lot of attention since it adds intentionality and planning to the repertory of non-human tool usage.

However, while the nighthawk’s behavior is new to Western science, it is well-known to the Alawa, MalakMalak, Jawoyn, and other Indigenous peoples of northern Australia, whose ancestors have lived on their lands for tens of thousands of years and whose ancestors occupied their lands for tens of thousands of years.

  1. They also point out that aspects of their ceremonial activities, beliefs, and creation tales are infused with knowledge of the behavior of firehawks from the surrounding area.
  2. Traditional Knowledge encompasses a wide range of topics, ranging from the therapeutic benefits of plants and insights into the importance of biological diversity to caribou migratory patterns and the impacts of intentionally burning the area to manage certain resources.
  3. Examples include the use of Qaujimajatuqangit (Inuit traditional knowledge) into certain climatology research in order to explain variations in sea ice conditions that have been seen over many generations.
  4. When these sorts of knowledge are used in conjunction with archaeological or other scientific data, they are considered valuable on the one hand and unimportant on the other.
  5. Traditional Knowledge, on the other hand, may be perceived as anecdotal, imprecise, and foreign in form, whereas science is portrayed as objective, quantitative, and the foundation for “real” knowledge generation and evaluation.
  6. Is it more accurate to say that they provide many access points into knowledge of the world, past and present?
  7. Various Methods of Recognizing There are several instances in which science and history are now catching up with what Indigenous peoples have understood for centuries.

It is believed that the ancestors of the Kwakwaka’wakw and other Indigenous communities in the area built and maintained what have come to be known as “clam gardens”—rock-walled, terrace-like structures that offer excellent habitat for butter clams and other edible shellfish over thousands of years.

  1. As marine scientist Amy Groesbeck and colleagues have showed, these structures greatly boost shellfish yield while also increasing resource security.
  2. These published research findings now demonstrate that Indigenous tribes have been practicing mariculture for decades, despite the fact that Western scientists have never inquired about it.
  3. Various Indigenous tribes in the region are working together to preserve and rebuild clam gardens, with the goal of putting them back into use.
  4. When it comes to the War of Greasy Grass (Little Big Horn) in 1876, there are substantial disparities between Lakota and Cheyenne recollections of what happened and the historical narratives that arose shortly after the battle by white commentators.
  5. Detailed drawings of Red Horse, a Minneconjou Sioux participant in the war, are preserved in theledger drawings, which include soldier outfits, the location of wounds on horses, and the distribution of Indian and white losses in the conflict.
  6. What this analysis uncovered was a new, more accurate history of the war that corroborated many components of Native American oral narratives as well as the accompanying pictographs and artworks depicting the events of the battle itself.
  7. Hypotheses based on traditional knowledge-based information can pave the way for unexpected discoveries and breakthroughs.
  8. Glooscap, in his capacity as a Transformer, generated a variety of landscape elements.
  9. The Red Horse Pictographic Account of the Battle of the Little Bighorn, published in 1881, has an untitled image.
  10. Possibilities Exist at the Intersection Western and indigenous methods of knowing have numerous key and fundamental characteristics in common as ways of knowing.
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While some actions leave no physical evidence (e.g., clam cultivation) and some experiments cannot be replicated (e.g., cold fusion), in the case of Indigenous knowledge, the absence of “empirical evidence” can be detrimental to its acceptance by a wider audience and, therefore, its acceptance by a wider audience.

  • Instead than striving for a universal set of explanations as does Western knowledge (which is typically text-based, reductionist, hierarchical, and dependent on categorization (placing things into categories), Indigenous science is particularistic in orientation and frequently contextual.
  • Partnerships between indigenous knowledge holders and Western scientists are being formed in many locations across the world.
  • However, when their information, which has been disregarded for so long by so many, is recognized as an useful data source or is selectively utilised by academics and others, this poses a challenge.
  • Alternatively, we could claim that, after many thousand years, Western scientists have now caught up with Traditional Knowledge.

The original version of this article appeared on The Conversation. Prof. George Nicholas, of the Department of Archaeology at Simon Fraser University Animals Anthropology Archaeology Ecology Traditions and rites of passage Videos That Should Be Watched

Science and decision making: how do you decide what to believe?

It has been discovered that kites and falcons, known as “firehawks,” are actively carrying flaming sticks to spread fire across northern Australia. It is only one example of how western science is catching up with Indigenous Traditional Knowledge. Over the last 50 years, we’ve gained a greater understanding of what animals do when people aren’t there. Examples include the discovery that animals utilize tools in their daily lives. Chimps use twigs to forage for termites; sea otters split open shells on rocks that they have chosen; and octopi transport coconut shell halves to be used as homes later on in their lives.

  1. Researchers headed by Mark Bonta and Robert Gosford discovered kites and falcons, commonly known as “firehawks,” flying about in northern Australia with flaming sticks in their beaks with the goal of spreading the blaze.
  2. While it has long been known that birds will take advantage of natural fires that drive insects, rodents, and reptiles away and thus increase feeding opportunities, the fact that they would intercede to spread fire to previously unburned areas is even more amazing.
  3. In the past, reports of avian usage of fire have been disregarded, or at the very least met with some suspicion.
  4. Their ancestors have been living on their ancestral lands for tens of thousands of years, and the nighthawks’ behaviors are well understood by them.
  5. They also point out that aspects of their ceremonial activities, beliefs, and creation tales are infused with knowledge about the behavior of firehawks from the local perspective.
  6. It includes everything from therapeutic characteristics of plants to insights on the significance of biological variety, as well as caribou migratory patterns and the impacts of intentionally burning the terrain in order to manage certain resources.
  7. Several climatology studies, for example, have utilized Qaujimajatuqangit (Inuit traditional knowledge) to explain variations in sea ice conditions that have been seen over several generations.
  8. When these sorts of knowledge are used in conjunction with archaeological or other scientific data, they are considered valuable on the one hand and undesirable on the other.

Traditional Knowledge, on the other hand, may be perceived as anecdotal, imprecise, and foreign in form, whereas science is portrayed as objective, quantitative, and the foundation for “true” knowledge generation or evaluation Indigenous and Western systems of knowledge are they fundamentally diametrically opposed to one another?

With a butter clam in his hand, Kwaxsistalla Chief Adam Dick Knowledge in a variety of forms Throughout history, science and history have caught up with what Indigenous peoples have understood for centuries.

It is believed that the ancestors of the Kwakwaka’wakw and other Indigenous communities in the area built and maintained what have come to be known as “clam gardens”—rock-walled, terrace-like structures that offer a perfect habitat for butter clams and other edible shellfish over thousands of years.

  • In fact, as marine biologist Amy Groesbeck and colleagues have found, these structures dramatically boost shellfish productivity and resource security.
  • According to the findings of these published research papers, Indigenous groups have been practicing mariculture for millennia, but Western scientists have never inquired about it.
  • Various Indigenous tribes in the region are working together to preserve and rebuild clam gardens so that they may be put back into use.
  • When it comes to the War of Greasy Grass (Little Big Horn) in 1876, there are substantial disparities between the Lakota and Cheyenne tales and the historical reports that surfaced shortly after the battle by white commentators.
  • When Red Horse, a Minneconjou Sioux participant in the fight, was drawn by aledger, he recorded minute details such as soldier uniforms, the placement of wounds on horses, and the distribution of Indian and white losses.
  • As a result of this research, a new, more exact history of the fight was uncovered, which confirmed many of the features of Native American oral narratives as well as the pictographs and drawings depicting the events.
  • Experimenting with hypotheses that use traditional knowledge-based information might provide surprising results.
  • Glooscap, in his capacity as a Transformer, developed a variety of landforms.
  • The Red Horse Pictographic Account of the Battle of the Little Bighorn, published in 1881, has an untitled illustration.
  • Taking Advantage of the Crossroads Several major and fundamental characteristics distinguish Western and indigenous methods of knowing from one another.
  • While certain activities leave no physical record (e.g., clam farming) and other experiments cannot be repeated (e.g., cold fusion), the absence of “empirical proof” in the case of Indigenous knowledge might be detrimental to its adoption by a broader audience.
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When compared to Western knowledge, which is typically text-based, reductionist, hierarchical, and reliant on categorization (putting things into categories), Indigenous science does not strive for a universal set of explanations, instead preferring to be particularistic in orientation and frequently contextual.

Partnerships between indigenous knowledge holders and Western scientists are being formed in many locations throughout the globe.

While their wisdom, which has been disregarded for so long by so many, may now be considered useful data or exploited selectively by academics and others, this is a troubling development.

Alternatively, one could claim that, after several thousand years, Western scientists have finally caught up with Traditional Knowledge.

According to The Conversation, this story was first published on their website. Professor of Archaeology at Simon Fraser University, George Nicholas, Ph.D. Animals Anthropology Archaeology Ecology Traditions and rituals are important parts of life. Videos that should be watched

Contrasting student and scientific views

Between’real’ science and the science taught in schools, there is a chasm between the two. This distinction is brought home by many students’ everyday experiences. In addition, there are disparities between what younger primary school children believe about the significance of science in society and the job of scientists and what older higher school students feel about the same topics. The opinions expressed in the next section are primarily those of older pupils. Often, students mistakenly assume that science is a collection of facts that constitute “truth.” The methods in which science is presented in most science textbooks reinforces this image of scientific method.

  1. While students frequently express dissatisfaction with certain parts of science in society, the vast majority of students feel that science is helpful to society as a whole because it has the potential to enhance the quality of their lives.
  2. Students also have a tendency to recognize that scientists are individuals with diverse motives who frequently ask various questions about the same phenomenon, and who will, as a result, gather and interpret data in a variety of different ways.
  3. Students understand that scientists strive to be neutral and unbiased in their work.
  4. Students feel that scientists can give valuable insight when it comes to making decisions that affect society and individuals.
  5. In addition to believing that scientists are and should be concerned with the outcomes of their work (both helpful and negative), and that scientists should disclose these outcomes to the public, students also feel that the public should actively seek out such communication from scientists.

Scientific view

Scientific knowledge is defined as information that is currently acknowledged by the scientific community and that provides a theoretical explanation of the real-world situation. For the purpose of determining what constitutes acceptable science, the scientific community engages in a process of public peer review, in which science professionals form an agreement on what constitutes acceptable science. Due to the fact that it has passed a validation procedure and adds to the body of acknowledged scientific knowledge, this public process is commonly referred to as public science.

It is this type of public science that is extensively publicized.

This is the type of job that scientists do on a daily basis.

Personal interest, intuition, curiosity, creativity, and interpreting the work of other scientists may all be factors in the daily work of scientists.

The application of scientific knowledge is critical in the decision-making process for society; however, scientists and the general public share a mutual responsibility in communicating their knowledge to the public, as well as in seeking appropriate expert knowledge and considering the implications of that knowledge.

In its most basic definition, science may be defined as the process of logical inquiry that strives to give explanations for the observations of natural events that occur.

It’s crucial to remember that all scientific knowledge is the product of human endeavor and invention. FullickRatcliffe is doing research (1996)

Critical teaching ideas

  • Humans are the ones who develop scientific knowledge. Each scientist is familiar with both private science (his or her own personal understandings of science) and public science (the research that they give to the scientific community for assessment and eventual adoption)
  • And When it comes to public science, experimentation can only lead to private understanding
  • The community of scientists determines what is currently regarded as public science. Aesthetically pleasing stories of science can call into question many conventional assumptions of science and highlight science as a human endeavor.

Aikenhead is doing research (2006) The Concept Development Maps – Scientific World View, The Scientific Community, Science and Society, Evidence and Reasoning in Enquiry, Scientific Investigations, Scientific Theories, and Avoiding Biases in Science – allow you to examine the relationships between ideas about the nature of science in the following areas: Students should be aware that, while scientists get specialized training (as do many other professions) in order to carry out their work, they are still considered members of society, just like the rest of the population.

  1. In turn, this has an impact on the way individuals create their interpretations of the job they undertake on a daily basis.
  2. The majority of the information gathered through this job comes from direct (or indirect) observation, and in schools, this is generally accomplished via the use of experiments; however, in the workplace, scientists gain information through observation in a variety of methods.
  3. This is the scientist’s own scientific endeavor.
  4. The scientist examines the results of the research again and over again in order to detect patterns and determine what to trust.
  5. In science, the term “intuition” has a different meaning than it does in common English; in common language, intuition is significantly more closely associated with an immediate emotion or reaction that does not need any thinking or perceiving (a random, creative thing).
  6. In the day-to-day work of a scientist (private science), intuition is more likely to play a role than in the science that is reported (public science).
  7. Further examination would then be carried out, and other observations would be made, in order to form conclusions regarding the kind of items that float in water.
  8. This group of professionals holds each other’s work to a high standard of scrutiny.
  9. This is known as a scientist’s public science.
  10. Many hypotheses are originally rejected because they conflict with the ideals that are valued by society as a whole, or because they question scientifically accepted opinions held by other scientists, which are then rejected again.
  11. In particular, several of Halman’s examples provide as striking representations of how extremely difficult it may be to replace an accepted hypothesis that has been socially and scientifically accepted with a new theory in light of fresh data.

In a similar vein, it is critical for students to have firsthand experience with a consensus-building process and be able to define the method that they employ in order to determine what to believe.

Teaching activities

The science taught in schools is frequently not representative of a genuine understanding of modern scientific thought. In many cases, the “humanness” of science is lost, resulting in a decontextualized vision of science that is not tied to society or to individuals’ everyday lives. While scientific education in schools may be seen of as at best a means of telling a tale about science, it is critical that this science education (story) be as accurate as possible in its portrayal of the subject matter.

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When delivering this type of tale, the science might become’messy’ since it does not fit neatly into neat categories, which makes the story more interesting.

Provide an open problem to be explored via play or through problem solving

It is possible to engage in some lengthy activities with students in order to assist them understand the differences between private science and public science, as well as the moral and ethical considerations that are made in the context of especially public science. For example, there are several ethical issues depicted in television dramas that might be utilized in science courses as examples of ethical difficulties. One episode of the television show ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ has been cited by some science teachers as an example.

It is possible that just one of the two will be spared.

Corrigan and Dillon Gunstone conducted research (2007)

Focus students’ attention on overlooked detail

Following the lives of a number of notable figures in science might reveal the ephemeral nature of what is considered acceptable in the field of science at a given point in time in the history of science. The history of Galileo’s life and thoughts, for example, gives some fascinating insights into human nature. Some of the concepts that should be pursued further are listed below. Galileo devoted a significant portion of his life to the study of motion and falling objects, notably via the investigation of the use of an inclined plane for the rolling of balls.

It is exceedingly unlikely that he dropped balls from the Leaning Tower of Pisa, despite the fact that this has become the most generally circulated version of the account of his accomplishments.

It took 40 years after Galileo’s death before the first narrative about his dumping anything from the Leaning Tower of Pisa arose. Further explanation of this may be found in the following article on Physics World:

Meanwhile, the crucial role played by Galileo’s thought experiments in the evolution of his theories is almost universally overlooked or totally overlooked altogether. Galileo was also interested in the technological advances of his day, such as those made by cannon manufacturers. When the cannon manufacturers drilled their cannons, they made educated guesses about where the cannon balls would land. They also graphed the outcomes of firing a body in a horizontal direction to see how well it performed.

Aside from that, Galileo was ordered to stand trial for refusing to renounce his support for Copernicus’ views that the Earth revolved around the Sun, which he did just before his death.

This interaction between scholars and society (in this case, the Church) is an essential concept to investigate further.

Further resources​

  • In addition, NobelPrize.org, which is maintained by the Nobel Prize Organization, includes biographies of all Nobel Prize-winning scientists.

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