What Fruit To Avoid When Taking Triamterene?

What Fruit To Avoid When Taking Triamterene
Watch what you eat when taking medication Medications interact with foods and nutrients in various ways, and a little study can help you avoid problems. Some medications can decrease appetite or change the way a nutrient is absorbed, metabolized or excreted.

Food you eat could make the medications you take work faster, slower, or even prevent them from working. Besides certain foods, some beverages, alcohol, caffeine, and even cigarettes can interact with medicines. This may make them less effective or may cause dangerous side effects or other problems. Here is information about interactions that can occur between many common prescription and over-the-counter medications with food, alcohol and caffeine.

This information should not replace the advice from your physician, pharmacist or other health care professional. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) These reduce pain, fever, and inflammation. Examples are aspirin (such as Bayer or Ecotrin); ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) and naproxen (Anaprox, Aleve, Naprosyn).

These medications can irritate the stomach; it is best to take them with food or milk.Avoid or limit the use of alcohol because chronic use can increase your risk of liver damage or stomach bleeding. Diuretics

Sometimes called “water pills,” diuretics help eliminate water, sodium, and chloride from the body. Examples are furosemide (such as Lasix); triamterene and hydrochlorothiazide (Dyazide, Maxzide); hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril); and triamterene (Dyrenium).

Some diuretics cause loss of potassium, calcium and magnesium. Triamterene, on the other hand, is known as a “potassium-sparing” diuretic. It blocks the kidneys’ excretion of potassium, which can cause hyperkalemia (increased potassium). Excess potassium may result in irregular heartbeat and heart palpitations.

When taking triamterene, avoid eating large amounts of potassium-rich foods such as bananas, oranges and green leafy vegetables, or salt substitutes that contain potassium. Anticoagulants These help prevent the formation of blood clots. An example is warfarin (Coumadin).

  1. Vitamin K produces blood-clotting substances and may reduce the effectiveness of anticoagulants, so limit the amount of foods high in vitamin K (including broccoli, spinach, kale, turnip greens, cauliflower and brussels sprouts).
  2. Cardiovascular drugs Statins are used to lower cholesterol levels.
  3. Examples are atorvastatin (Lipitor); and simvastatin (Zocor).

Calcium channel blockers are common drugs that reduce high blood pressure. Examples are Adalat and Procardia. Avoid grapefruit juice. These drugs interact with grapefruit juice in a way that increases the blood concentration of the drug. : Watch what you eat when taking medication

What fruits interfere with high blood pressure medication?

5 bad-news foods for blood pressure –

Grapefruit juice. Grapefruit contains compounds that may interfere with how your body absorbs some drugs, including some blood pressure medicines. It can leave too much or too little of the drug in your bloodstream, which may be dangerous. Always ask your doctor or pharmacist if grapefruit could affect the medicine you’re taking.

What to try instead: Sip on other 100 percent fruit juices. Or, even better, go for sugar-free drinks like water with a twist of lemon.

Black licorice. Licorice root contains a compound that, in large amounts, can lower potassium levels. Low potassium may cause blood pressure to skyrocket. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns that if you’re 40 or older, eating 2 ounces of black licorice a day for two weeks or longer could be dangerous.

What to try instead: Many licorice-flavored products sold in the U.S. don’t contain real licorice root. Look for low-sugar items flavored with anise oil instead.

Processed meats. Too much sodium in your diet can make blood pressure climb. Just one 2-ounce serving of deli meat can contain as much as half of the recommended sodium in your daily diet. Sodium hides in other common processed foods too, like bread, pizza and canned soup. So make it a habit to read nutrition labels and choose foods labeled low sodium, reduced sodium or no salt added,

What to try instead: Opt for fresh meats instead of preserved ones. And try more meatless sandwich fillers like fresh veggies and low-sodium beans.

Sugary drinks. Sweetened beverages—like soft drinks—are a major source of added sugar. All that sugar adds empty calories that may lead to weight gain. And those extra pounds can make it harder to keep blood pressure in a healthy range.

What to try instead: Satisfy your sweet tooth with fresh fruits. They have natural sugars and nutrients your body needs, including blood pressure-friendly potassium.

Baked goods. Many baked goods—like cookies, crackers and doughnuts—are loaded with saturated and trans fats. These unhealthy fats can contribute to high blood pressure. So it’s important to choose low-fat alternatives and avoid foods that say hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated on the label.

What to try instead: Try your hand at making your own baked goods at home, where you can control what goes in. In most recipes, you can trade some of the high-fat butter for a heart-healthy oil, like canola.

What is the most significant adverse effect of triamterene?

Side Effects -,,, or may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or promptly. Remember that this has been prescribed because your doctor has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including:, enlarged or in males, symptoms of a level (such as muscle, slow/irregular heartbeat). A very serious to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious, including:, /swelling (especially of the face//throat), severe dizziness,,

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. In the US – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Can you eat bananas with hydrochlorothiazide?

They may also ask you to increase the amount of potassium-rich foods such as bananas, orange juice, raisins, and prunes in your diet. This is because hydrochlorothiazide can cause serum potassium depletion.

Do bananas interfere with blood pressure medication?

Published: April 20, 2022 By Michael Merschel, American Heart Association News (InspirationGP/iStock via Getty Images) On the screen, bananas are a menace. Just ask Charlie Chaplin, Bugs Bunny or anyone who’s played Mario Kart. In your diet, though, bananas can be a boon. Experts have a bunch of reasons to like them and see only a few ways the elongated yellow fruit could cause your health to slip.

  • They’re rich in nutrients and fiber,” said Colleen Spees, associate professor of medical dietetics at Ohio State University Medical Center in Columbus.
  • They’re delicious.
  • They’re inexpensive.
  • They’re all the right things.” They’re the world’s most popular fruit and have been cultivated for perhaps 10,000 years.

Some scholars think the tempting fruit in the Biblical Garden of Eden sounds more like a banana than an apple. Bananas turn up in religious traditions from around the world. Banana trees are actually herbs, and the fruit is technically a berry. A “bunch” refers to the cluster of bananas as harvested.

A small cluster of bananas is a “hand,” and an individual banana is a “finger.” Whatever you call them, bananas are noted for being a good source of potassium, Spees said. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, one medium banana provides 375 milligrams. That’s about 11% of the recommended daily potassium for a man and 16% for a woman.

“Potassium is a mineral that is vital for heart health, especially in terms of blood pressure management,” Spees said. (It’s true other foods – including lima beans and beet greens – are higher in potassium, she said, “but how many people are eating the greens of beets?”) Bananas also are a source of magnesium (32 mg), beneficial phytochemicals and antioxidants.

  • One medium banana, which contains 113 calories, also has about 5 grams of total dietary fiber, which helps people feel full.
  • And the fiber in bananas has “really interesting” qualities, Spees said.
  • Unripe and slightly unripe bananas contain resistant starch, which serves as prebiotic fiber.
  • These indigestible prebiotics serve as food for probiotics, the “good” microbes that live in the gut.

These beneficial gut bacteria are essential for digestion and have been linked to immunity, brain health and more. As a banana ripens, the resistant starch is broken down into natural sugars, Spees said. “That’s why a riper banana is a little bit sweeter than a slightly unripe banana.” Certain special situations call for caution, she said.

  • Although bananas, like most fruit, can be part of a healthy dietary pattern for people with uncontrolled diabetes, a medium banana has about 26 grams of carbohydrates, which must be a consideration for people on strict diets.
  • People with late-stage kidney failure need to closely monitor potassium consumption.

Foods high in potassium also can interfere with some medications for high blood pressure and heart failure. It certainly would take more than one banana to raise potassium levels to a dangerous level for the average person, Spees said. But she recommends anyone with medical conditions or concerns check with their primary care physician to see if bananas are safe for them.

What’s problematic, though, is to assume slipping them into a banana split or banana bread makes those desserts healthy, she said. The same can be said for banana chips. “Most banana chips are actually dried and fried,” Spees said. “And some of them are coated with either an oil or a syrup that then contributes a significant source of added sugars, calories and fats.” But bananas work well at thickening and sweetening smoothies, Spees said.

“If you’re mixing a frozen banana with, say, Greek yogurt, frozen berries and other healthy ingredients, that’s great.” Part of the banana’s beauty, she said, is its convenience. In the morning, it can be sliced and added to whole-wheat cereal. Later in the day, “it’s a great snack.” Some people enjoy bananas with nut butters or mixed with yogurt.

Which fruit is not good for blood pressure?

8 foods to avoid – Highly processed foods, saturated fats, salt, fried food, and excessive alcohol intake should be avoided. These can elevate blood pressure, according to Dr. Landsman. Exceeding your recommended daily calorie intake is also bad for your blood pressure.

  1. Too many calories causes weight gain.
  2. Excess weight elevates blood pressure,” Jones says.
  3. Diets high in sodium, which is found in many smoked or cured foods and sauces, can also raise blood pressure.
  4. A particularly bad combination for blood pressures are diets high in salt but low in potassium from fruits and vegetables, low in other needed minerals such as calcium from dairy products, and magnesium from whole grains and vegetables,” says Jones.

These foods should be avoided as they may raise your blood pressure:

Processed meats such as bacon and hot dogs Canned foods with preservatives High-sodium foods such as pickles and potato chips Fried foods such as french fries and chicken strips Fatty meats, especially red meat Vegetable oil and margarine, which are high in trans fat Table salt Grapefruit*

*Note: Grapefruit and grapefruit juice can interact negatively with certain blood pressure medications. Consult a healthcare provider or dietitian about possible food-drug interactions before changing your diet. Overall, to improve your heart health, eat a low-sodium diet including lean meat and less added sugars.

What are the 5 best fruits for high blood pressure?

– Berries have been associated with a variety of impressive health benefits, including their potential to reduce heart disease risk factors like high blood pressure. Berries are a rich source of antioxidants, including anthocyanins, which are pigments that give berries their vibrant color.

What precautions are required with triamterene?

Side Effects – Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

You might be interested:  What Color Does Pink And Blue Make?

What should I monitor when taking triamterene?

Precautions – Drug information provided by: Merative, Micromedex ® It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly and to decide if you should continue to take it. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

Make sure your doctor knows if you are also taking potassium supplements or salt substitutes containing potassium, or certain diuretics such as amiloride (Midamor®, Moduretic®), spironolactone (Aldactazide®, Aldactone®), or other products containing triamterene. Using these medicines together may cause serious problems.

This medicine may increase the amount of potassium in your blood (hyperkalemia). Check with your doctor right away if you have stomach pain, confusion, irregular heartbeat, nausea or vomiting, nervousness, numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips, trouble breathing, or weakness or heaviness of the legs.

Check with your doctor immediately if blurred vision, difficulty in reading, eye pain, or any other change in vision occurs during or after treatment. Your doctor may want you to have your eyes checked by an ophthalmologist (eye doctor). This medicine may affect blood sugar levels. Check with your doctor if you notice a change in the results of your blood or urine sugar tests.

This medicine may make you dizzy or drowsy. Avoid driving, using machines, or doing anything else that could be dangerous if you are not alert. Dizziness may be worse if you lose too much water from your body. You can lose water by sweating, having diarrhea, or vomiting.

  • Tell your doctor if this medicine makes you feel lightheaded or dizzy after you have been vomiting or had diarrhea.
  • Check with your doctor right away if you experience drowsiness, fainting, confusion, muscle pain, weakness, and/or a fast heartbeat.
  • Use extra care if you exercise or if the weather is hot.

Heavy sweating can cause dehydration (loss of too much water) or electrolyte imbalances (loss of sodium, potassium, or magnesium in the body). This medicine may increase your risk of getting skin cancer (eg, non-melanoma skin cancer). Avoid sun exposure.

Use a sunscreen when you are outdoors. Avoid sunlamps and tanning beds. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns about this risk. This medicine may cause serious kidney problems, including kidney stones. Check with your doctor right away if you have lower back or side pain, decreased frequency or amount of urine, bloody urine, increased thirst, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, unusual tiredness or weakness, swelling of the face, fingers, or lower legs, weight gain, or trouble breathing.

Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. The results of some tests may be affected by this medicine. Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor.

Is triamterene a good blood pressure medicine?

Descriptions – Triamterene is used alone or in combination with other medicines to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure adds to the workload of the heart and arteries. If it continues for a long time, the heart and arteries may not function properly.

This can damage the blood vessels of the brain, heart, and kidneys, resulting in a stroke, heart failure, or kidney failure. High blood pressure may also increase the risk of heart attacks. These problems may be less likely to occur if blood pressure is controlled, Triamterene is also used to treat water retention (edema) in patients with congestive heart failure, liver cirrhosis, or a kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome,

Triamterene is a type of diuretic (water pill) that helps prevent your body from losing too much potassium. It reduces the amount of water in the body by increasing the flow of urine, which helps lower the blood pressure, This medicine is available only with your doctor’s prescription,

Capsule

Can you eat bananas while taking triamterene HCTZ?

Watch what you eat when taking medication Medications interact with foods and nutrients in various ways, and a little study can help you avoid problems. Some medications can decrease appetite or change the way a nutrient is absorbed, metabolized or excreted.

  • Food you eat could make the medications you take work faster, slower, or even prevent them from working.
  • Besides certain foods, some beverages, alcohol, caffeine, and even cigarettes can interact with medicines.
  • This may make them less effective or may cause dangerous side effects or other problems.
  • Here is information about interactions that can occur between many common prescription and over-the-counter medications with food, alcohol and caffeine.

This information should not replace the advice from your physician, pharmacist or other health care professional. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) These reduce pain, fever, and inflammation. Examples are aspirin (such as Bayer or Ecotrin); ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) and naproxen (Anaprox, Aleve, Naprosyn).

These medications can irritate the stomach; it is best to take them with food or milk.Avoid or limit the use of alcohol because chronic use can increase your risk of liver damage or stomach bleeding. Diuretics

Sometimes called “water pills,” diuretics help eliminate water, sodium, and chloride from the body. Examples are furosemide (such as Lasix); triamterene and hydrochlorothiazide (Dyazide, Maxzide); hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril); and triamterene (Dyrenium).

  1. Some diuretics cause loss of potassium, calcium and magnesium.
  2. Triamterene, on the other hand, is known as a “potassium-sparing” diuretic.
  3. It blocks the kidneys’ excretion of potassium, which can cause hyperkalemia (increased potassium).
  4. Excess potassium may result in irregular heartbeat and heart palpitations.

When taking triamterene, avoid eating large amounts of potassium-rich foods such as bananas, oranges and green leafy vegetables, or salt substitutes that contain potassium. Anticoagulants These help prevent the formation of blood clots. An example is warfarin (Coumadin).

  • Vitamin K produces blood-clotting substances and may reduce the effectiveness of anticoagulants, so limit the amount of foods high in vitamin K (including broccoli, spinach, kale, turnip greens, cauliflower and brussels sprouts).
  • Cardiovascular drugs Statins are used to lower cholesterol levels.
  • Examples are atorvastatin (Lipitor); and simvastatin (Zocor).

Calcium channel blockers are common drugs that reduce high blood pressure. Examples are Adalat and Procardia. Avoid grapefruit juice. These drugs interact with grapefruit juice in a way that increases the blood concentration of the drug. : Watch what you eat when taking medication

What foods should you avoid while taking diuretics?

How does furosemide work? Furosemide is a type of medicine called a loop diuretic. A diuretic makes your body get rid of extra fluid through your kidneys. A loop diuretic works on a specific part of the kidney called the loop of Henle to increase the salt and water you pee out.

  • This means you have less fluid in your tissues which helps get rid of swelling (oedema).
  • You will also have less fluid in your blood, which helps reduce blood pressure.
  • How long does furosemide take to work? Furosemide starts to work within 1 hour but it may take a few weeks to fully take effect.
  • If you’re taking furosemide for high blood pressure, you may not have any symptoms.

In this case, you may not feel any different when you take furosemide. This does not mean that the medicine is not working. It’s important to keep taking it. How long does it work for? A dose of furosemide works for about 6 hours. Are there any long-term side effects? Furosemide is safe to take for a long time, but you will have to see your doctor or nurse regularly for blood and urine tests.

  • These make sure the chemicals in your blood are properly balanced.
  • How often you need to see your doctor or nurse for these tests will depend on the reason you’re taking furosemide, if your dose has changed recently, or if you have any other health problems.
  • How does furosemide compare with other diuretic medicines? There are other diuretics that work in a similar way to furosemide.

There are 3 different types of diuretic, and each type of diuretic works on a different part of the kidney:

loop diuretics (such as furosemide) including bumetanide and torasemide can also be used to treat heart failure. Torasemide can also be used to treat high blood pressurethiazide diuretics such as bendroflumethiazide and indapamide, are used in low doses to treat high blood pressure, and in higher doses to treat heart failurepotassium-sparing diuretics such as spironolactone and eplerenone, can be used to treat heart failure. These can also be used if you lose too much potassium with other diuretics

Can I stop taking furosemide now my blood pressure is lower? Even if furosemide brings down your blood pressure successfully, it’s best to carry on taking it. If you stop taking it, your blood pressure could go back up again. If you need medicines to lower your blood pressure, you’ll probably need them for the rest of your life.

  1. Remember, by keeping your blood pressure low, you’re protecting yourself against having a heart attack or stroke in the future.
  2. How much fluid should I drink while I’m taking furosemide? It’s usually best to drink normally while you’re taking furosemide.
  3. A good rule is to drink enough fluid so that you’re not thirsty for long periods, and to steadily increase your fluid intake when exercising and during hot weather.

Passing pale, clear pee is a good sign that you’re drinking enough. However, if you have heart failure or kidney problems you might need to limit how much fluid you drink. Your doctor or nurse will tell you exactly how much you need to drink each day. Can I take furosemide to lose weight? If you’re taking furosemide for high blood pressure or oedema you may lose a bit of weight as your body loses water.

  1. But do not take furosemide specifically to lose weight.
  2. Only take furosemide if it’s been prescribed, and only for the reason your doctor has prescribed it for you.
  3. Can I take furosemide before surgery? Tell your doctor that you’re taking furosemide if you’re going to be put to sleep with a general anaesthetic for an operation or you’re going to have a major operation, such as a Caesarean section, without a general anaesthetic.

Furosemide can reduce your blood pressure when it’s used with a general anaesthetic. Your doctor may advise you to stop taking furosemide 24 hours before surgery. Will it affect my contraception? Furosemide will not affect any type of contraception. However, some types of hormonal contraception, like the combined pill and contraceptive patch, are not usually recommended if you’re taking furosemide.

This is because some hormonal contraceptives can raise your blood pressure and stop the medicine working properly. Talk to your doctor if you’re taking or using hormonal contraceptives. If furosemide makes you sick (vomit), your contraceptive pills may not protect you from pregnancy. Check the pill packet to find out what to do.

Read more about what to do if you’re on the pill and you have diarrhoea, Can I drive or ride a bike? Furosemide can make you feel confused and dizzy. If this happens to you, do not drive, cycle, or use machinery or tools until you feel back to normal.

  • It’s an offence to drive a car if your ability to drive safely is affected.
  • It’s your responsibility to decide if it’s safe to drive.
  • If you’re in any doubt, do not drive.
  • Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you’re unsure whether it’s safe for you to drive while taking furosemide.
  • GOV.UK has more information on the law on drugs and driving,

Can I drink alcohol with while taking furosemide? During the first few days of taking furosemide, it’s best to stop drinking alcohol until you see how the medicine affects you. It may lower your blood pressure and make you feel dizzy. Is there any food or drink I need to avoid? If you’re taking a diuretic such as furosemide, it’s important not to have too much salt in your food because this can stop it working.

Do not eat foods that have a lot of salt in them, such as processed foods or ready-meals. Do not add extra salt when you’re cooking or at the table. Also, do not buy salt substitutes, like Lo-Salt, instead of ordinary table salt, as they contain a lot of potassium, which can affect the way certain medicines work, or cause side effects.

Adults are advised to eat no more than 6 grams of salt a day. Your doctor will tell you if you need to eat even less than this. Can lifestyle changes help high blood pressure? You can boost your general health, plus the health of your heart, by making some key lifestyle changes.

You might be interested:  What Goes With Red Beans And Rice?

Quit smoking – smoking increases your heart rate and blood pressure. Quitting smoking brings down your blood pressure and relieves heart failure symptoms. Try to avoid secondhand smoke too. Cut down on alcohol – drinking too much alcohol raises blood pressure over time and also makes heart failure worse. Men and women should not drink more than 14 units of alcohol a week.Be more active – regular exercise lowers blood pressure by keeping your heart and blood vessels in good condition. It does not need to be too energetic, walking every day can help. Eat healthily – aim to eat a diet that includes plenty of fruit and vegetables, wholegrains, fat-free or low-fat dairy products and lean proteins. It’s a good idea to follow these tips for a lower salt diet, however, it’s important not to go on a low-salt diet while taking this medicine, as that could make your sodium levels too low. People need salt in their diet but eating too much salt is the biggest cause of high blood pressure. The more salt you eat, the higher your blood pressure will be. Aim for no more than 6g of salt a day.Manage stress – when you’re anxious or upset, your heart beats faster, you breathe more heavily and your blood pressure often goes up. This can make heart failure worse too. Find ways to reduce stress in your life. To give your heart a rest, try napping or putting your feet up when possible. Spend time with friends and family to be social and help avoid stress. Vaccinations – if you have heart failure, it’s recommended that you have the flu vaccine every year and the pneumococcal vaccine as recommended by your GP. Ask your doctor about these vaccinations. You can have them free on the NHS if you have heart failure. The coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine is recommended for most people. Make sure you’ve had all the doses that you are eligible for. Talk to your doctor if you think you might be in one of the at risk groups.

Can you drink orange juice with hydrochlorothiazide?

Precautions – Drug information provided by: Merative, Micromedex ® It is important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects, Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor.

This especially includes over-the-counter (nonprescription) medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems, since they may tend to increase your blood pressure. This medicine may cause some people to have headaches or to feel dizzy. Make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy or are not alert.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting may occur, especially when you get up from a lying or sitting position. This is more likely to occur in the morning. Getting up slowly may help. When you get up from lying down, sit on the edge of the bed with your feet dangling for 1 or 2 minutes.

  1. Then stand up slowly.
  2. If the problem continues or gets worse, check with your doctor.
  3. The dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting is also more likely to occur if you drink alcohol, stand for a long time, exercise, or if the weather is hot.
  4. While you are taking this medicine, be careful in the amount of alcohol you drink.

Also, use extra care during exercise or hot weather or if you must stand for a long time. This medicine may cause a loss of potassium from your body.

To help prevent this, your doctor may want you to:

eat or drink foods that have a high potassium content (for example, orange or other citrus fruit juices), or take a potassium supplement, or take another medicine to help prevent the loss of the potassium in the first place.

It is very important to follow these directions. Also, it is important not to change your diet on your own. This is more important if you are already on a special diet (as for diabetes), or if you are taking a potassium supplement or a medicine to reduce potassium loss. Extra potassium may not be necessary and, in some cases, too much potassium could be harmful.

Check with your doctor if you become sick and have severe or continuing nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. These problems may cause you to lose additional water and potassium. For diabetic patients:

Thiazide diuretics may raise blood sugar levels. While you are using this medicine, be especially careful in testing for sugar in your blood or urine. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.

Some people who take this medicine may become more sensitive to sunlight than they are normally. Exposure to sunlight, even for brief periods of time, may cause severe sunburn; skin rash, redness, itching, or discoloration; or vision changes. When you begin taking this medicine:

Stay out of direct sunlight, especially between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., if possible. Wear protective clothing, including a hat and sunglasses. Apply a sun block product that has a skin protection factor (SPF) of at least 15. Some patients may require a product with a higher SPF number, especially if they have a fair complexion. If you have any questions about this, check with your health care professional. Do not use a sunlamp or tanning bed or booth.

If you have a severe reaction from the sun, check with your doctor.

How many bananas should I eat a day to lower my blood pressure?

What Fruit To Avoid When Taking Triamterene High blood pressure is a condition where the strain of flowing blood against the arteries is higher than the delicate blood vessels can bear. This can happen due to many reasons including, poor diet, fast-paced life and stress. One of the main causes of high blood pressure is the high level of sodium in the body.

This causes an imbalance in the water levels of the body due to which kidneys cannot flush out excess water. In this scenario, the kidneys start working harder to flush out water, putting a lot of pressure on blood vessels. Potassium reduces the effect of sodium on the body. Hence, eating bananas lower blood pressure due to their high potassium content.

You can try eating 2 bananas per day for one week which may reduce your blood pressure by 10%*. You should not eat bananas for dinner as they may not digest properly at night. Eating bananas for high blood pressure may not be recommended to you if you have other chronic health issues or medical conditions with BP.

When should you not eat bananas?

How Many Bananas Should You Eat per Day? – Now that you know all the ways bananas can benefit you, how many should you eat? Well, there’s no blanket rule. However, sticking to 1 to 2 bananas per day shouldn’t cause issues for most people. They are relatively high in carbohydrates, so eating them along with protein or fat is also advisable to support stable energy levels.

People with advanced kidney disease should limit bananas and other foods that are high in potassium to protect their kidneys and heart from damage. Eating too many bananas (or other high-potassium foods) can cause excess potassium in the body, also called hyperkalemia. This can cause serious health problems, including heart issues.

While most people wouldn’t be able to stomach the number of bananas necessary to cause this to happen, it’s something to be mindful of. Bananas are best consumed the same as other healthy foods: in moderation and as part of a healthy, balanced meal or snack.

Are apples good for high blood pressure?

Apples: The Miracle Fruit – Heart disease can be influenced by a number of factors; having high blood pressure or high cholesterol can increase your risk exponentially. Being overweight or diabetic can also increase your chances of heart disease as you age.

Luckily, apples, often called a “miracle fruit,” can help prevent all of these factors. First, apples are a great source of soluble fiber. Soluble fiber is now known for lowering the “bad” cholesterol in your body. Apples can also help keep your blood pressure at healthy levels. High blood pressure results in around 1,100 deaths per day in the U.S., which means keeping your blood pressure down is vital for living a healthy life.

Fortunately, having an apple a day can help with just that. Apples are full of polyphenols and potassium, aka blood pressure lowering elements. Because of how filling they are, eating an apple before a meal can help with weight lost as well. Apples are low in calories but help keep you satisfied and energized for hours.

Is yogurt good for high blood pressure?

People who take in at least 2% of their calories from yogurt have lower blood pressure and are about 30% less likely to develop hypertension than people who do not eat yogurt, scientists reported at the American Heart Association’s High Blood Pressure Research meeting in Washington, D.C.

  • The yogurt finding is from a study in which researchers followed nearly 2,200 adults for 15 years and assessed their diets periodically with a questionnaire.
  • Eating at least one 6-ounce serving of yogurt every three days would provide the 2% “dose” cited in the study.
  • Yogurt by itself does not lower blood pressure or prevent hypertension.

But a diet that includes nutrient-rich foods like low-fat yogurt instead of less healthy foods does combat high blood pressure. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) plan calls for two to three servings of low-fat dairy per day. As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content.

Is Egg good for high blood pressure?

Discussion – The overall outcome of this meta-analysis from fifteen eligible RCTs showed no significant effect of egg consumption on blood pressure. Subgroup analyses showed that the pooled effects of egg consumption on SBP and DBP were not influenced by study design, sex, population health status, obesity and HTN status, diet adherence, study duration, and number of eggs consumed. HTN is a strong risk factor for CVD and strokes, The results from our study are in accordance with a meta-analysis of cohort studies that reported intake of one egg/day compared with low egg intake (approximately 4 whole eggs/week compared with < 4 whole eggs/week intake did not influence blood pressure in middle-aged and older adults, The beneficial effects of egg consumption on blood pressure in humans may be attributed to the presence of nutrients with antioxidant and antihypertensive effects in whole eggs, For example, beneficial effects of egg white derived peptides on blood pressure have been shown in animal studies. In these studies, orally administered IQW (Ile-Gln-Trp) and LKP (Leu-Lys-Pro) (tripeptides provided by enzymatic digestion of the ovotransferrin) decreased mean blood pressure in hypertensive rats, Additionally, orally administered egg white hydrolysate and an antihypertensive tripeptide Ile-Arg-Trp (IRW) reduced blood pressure in hypertensive rats. In these studies, reduction of blood pressure was concomitant with increased nitric oxide (NO) mediated vasodilatation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition, reduced vascular inflammation and oxidative stress, reduced ACE and angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression, and increased ACE2 expression, We considered several possible explanations for the lack of association between egg consumption and blood pressure in the current meta-analysis. Firstly, blood pressure was not a primary objective in the majority of the trials included in this meta-analysis, which may have resulted in inadequate statistical power to detect significant changes regarding the effects of egg consumption on blood pressure. Secondly, it is possible that lifestyle factors associated with egg consumption may influence HTN, as higher egg consumption tends to be associated with smoking, physical inactivity, and increased consumption of red and processed meat, These factors tend to exaggerate the association between egg consumption and HTN, Thirdly, heterogeneity of control interventions is an important factor which can significantly alter blood pressure results. In three of the fifteen studies included in the current meta-analysis, egg consumption was compared with consumption of oatmeal, A recent systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrated that ß-glucan can decrease SBP by 0.22 mmHg per gram consumed, and oatmeal intake in the studies included in the present systematic review and meta-analysis varied between 40 and 60 g. Additionally, two studies used lean animal protein and choline bitartrate supplement as control. Fourthly, baseline characteristics of the studied populations must be considered. Thus, we performed subgroup analyses for baseline characteristics for all studies included in the present meta-analysis. However, due to small number of trials in each subgroup, we could not find association in this regard. Of the fifteen trials included in the current meta-analysis, thirteen trials found that egg consumption did not affect blood pressure, while in one trial, consumption of three eggs per day in overweight or obese participants significantly reduced SBP and DBP relative to the control group, Additionally, one study demonstrated that consumption of three eggs per day in healthy participants significantly reduced DBP but had no effect on SBP, Taken together, these data suggest that high egg intake, baseline characteristics of participants (healthy not sick), and intervention in the control group (low or no egg consumption or egg substitute) have an important role in the association between egg consumption and blood pressure. Finally, most of the included studies in this meta-analysis utilized a crossover design with short washout periods ranging from 0 to 6 weeks, Inadequate and/or inconsistent washout periods from one intervention to the next may lead to inaccurate results, potentially due to carryover effects from the first arm into the second. To our knowledge, the current systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs is the first to evaluate the effect of egg consumption on blood pressure in general adult population. We performed several subgroup analyses to identify the possible source of heterogeneity that may be influencing the relationship between egg consumption and blood pressure. Moreover, doing comprehensive literature search to include available RCTs is examining the effect of egg consumption on blood pressure. As with all systematic reviews and meta-analyses, the current analysis has some limitations. First, blood pressure was not a primary objective in almost all included studies, so it is possible that the study sample size was not sufficient to detect significant relationship. Second, the number of RCTs assessing the association between egg consumption and blood pressure was small and most studies were of low or fair quality, which can be attributed mostly to lack of blinding of participants, personnel, and outcome assessment. These issues should be addressed in future studies. Third, the different types of placebo in control groups may have imposed effects on our results. Fourth, most included studies did not adjust the effect of confounding factors including medications, physical activity, and dietary habit which may have affected the results regarding the relationship between egg consumption and blood pressure.

You might be interested:  What Happens To An Irrevocable Trust When The Grantor Dies?

Is Egg bad for high blood pressure?

Discussion – In this study, in Spanish adults, egg consumption was negatively associated with SBP, DBP, MAP, and HbA1c levels, although these associations lost statistical significance when considering the confounding effect of sociodemographic and diet-related aspects such as BMI, total energy intake and adherence to the MD.

  1. Furthermore, no differences were found between normal weight, overweight and obese individuals.
  2. Taken together, our findings corroborate the evidence that these individual characteristics exert a relevant role in addition to those from the bioactive components of the egg.
  3. Viewed another way, they support that within a balanced and good quality dietary pattern, the consumption of up to 1 egg per day is safe because it does not imply negative effects on blood pressure and blood sugar control even in overweight or obese individuals.

Our results regarding eggs and blood pressure are overall consistent with those from other cross-sectional and prospective studies carried out with different adult populations in several countries 17, 18, 19, 20, However, other studies found contradictory results both in the US 12, 21 and in other countries 11, 22,

  1. The Westernized dietary pattern, which is predominant among US adults and is increasing in other developed countries 23, has been pointed to as one of the main reasons for the discrepancy between studies conducted in different countries 21, 24, 25,
  2. On the one hand, compared with other dietary patterns, the Westernized diet is characterized by a higher intake of total daily energy and foods associated with hypertension, such as red meat, sausages and ultra-processed foods rich in saturated fatty acids and sodium 26,

For eggs, the average number of servings per week is very different from country to country 6, In that sense, part of the population of Spain, like the participants in the present study, adhere to the Mediterranean Diet, a dietary pattern consistently associated with lower cardiovascular risk 27,

It is possible that the increase in blood pressure observed in the US studies and other countries is accounted for by the other unhealthy foods consumed in the usual diet by the average higher egg consumption in the US. Therefore, dietary aspects such as unhealthy dietary foods and accompaniments, mode of cooking, and body composition may play a more important role in the possible risk of hypertension than egg consumption in isolation.

This more comprehensive view of the dietary effects on health must consider the diet as a whole, but isolated foods have been strengthened in recent years 28, Regarding the possible relationship between egg consumption and glycemic control, our results indicate that, similar to what we observed with peripheral blood pressure parameters, the frequency of egg consumption appears to be unrelated to blood sugar levels.

  1. Importantly, our results are based on the percentage of HbA1c, a more suitable biochemical indicator of glycemic control than fasting blood glucose because it is less subject to fluctuations due to recent dietary intake and fasting time 29,
  2. Consistent with our findings, the available evidence from prospective studies 25, 30, 31 and a randomized clinical trial 28 predominantly supports that consuming eggs does not interfere with glycemic control.

Furthermore, as we have seen in unadjusted analyses, other authors found associations compatible with possible benefits of egg consumption on blood sugar levels. For example, in a cross-sectional study of more than 3 thousand Chinese adults, a dose–response curve showed that with the increase in egg consumption, the risk of type 2 diabetes first increased and then decreased 32,

Some authors argue that the protective effect of the eggs consumed on glycemia could be due to the higher intake of specific bioactive components of this food involved in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes 33, specifically choline and polyunsaturated fatty acids (linolenic and docosahexaenoic acids) 34,

While this biological pathway is quite reasonable and certainly requires in-depth research, our data support that the results of these studies could be confounded by variables included in our analyses and not considered by those authors, such as BMI and behavioral variables such as total energy intake, quality of diet and the amount of physical activity.

The possible interactions found in other studies with respect to sex 5, 19 were not corroborated by our findings since we did not detect effect modification between men and women for the associations of egg consumption with blood pressure or HbA1c. The same was observed with BMI in our analyses, which is contrary to some studies that reported different findings for people with and without obesity, with reference to egg consumption both in relation to blood pressure 19 and diabetes risk 35,

It is worth mentioning that in our analyses, specifically in the obese group, the levels of blood pressure and HbA1c were significantly higher in the 2nd quartile than in the 1st quartile, decreasing again in the 3rd and 4th quartiles. We can conjecture that this occurred because, compared to the 1st quartile, the 2nd quartile shows a higher proportion of men (41.9 vs.55.6%, respectively), higher mean BMI (28.4 vs.30.5 kg/m 2, respectively) and higher total daily energy intake (2,205.6 vs.2,502.5 kcal/day, respectively).

  • However, these unexpected results remain not completely justified since our analyses were adjusted for these variables.
  • Future studies are needed to better understand why egg consumption might present a nonlinear relationship with peripheral blood pressure levels 20, particularly in obese individuals, as observed in the present analyses.

Some limitations must be considered for the correct interpretation of the present results. First, the cross-sectional design prevents us from drawing conclusions about the temporal relationship between consuming eggs and variations in blood pressure levels and HbA1c.

  • Therefore, longitudinal studies with subgroups of normal weight, overweight, and obese participants exposed to different amounts of egg consumption are needed to confirm that consuming up to 1 daily egg is safe for blood sugar and blood pressure control even in the presence of excess weight.
  • Second, although this is a multicenter study with a sample obtained from health centers in different regions of Spain, it cannot be inferred that the results apply to all adults in the country.

Moreover, the participants in the present study were free of advanced CVD, cancer, or other major physical or mental disorders. Therefore, caution must be taken in extrapolating the results to populations with sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics, as well as health conditions different from those analyzed.

Third, if we examined objective parameters of body weight and height, blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin with high validity and reliability, information on diet and other covariates was obtained subjectively. Although the applied questionnaires collected data subject to recall and information bias, this is a limitation shared with most epidemiological studies with considerable sample sizes, such as ours.

Finally, although our analyses included adjustment for several variables, residual confounding remains a potential limitation (such as comorbidities and the use of drugs for treatment, family history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus, specific consumption of other foods with an effect on blood pressure and on the glycemic level, among others).

The results of this cross-sectional study with Spanish adults allow us to conclude that egg consumption is not associated with blood pressure and glycemic control when considering sociodemographic, lifestyle and BMI as confounding factors. No associations were confirmed even in overweight or obese individuals.

These findings are consistent with previous research that found a significant association between higher egg consumption and potential benefits for human health. In addition, our study might reinforce the moderate consumption of eggs along with a balanced healthy diet and lifestyle.

What is the number one food that causes high blood pressure?

Salt or sodium Salt, or specifically the sodium in salt, is a major contributor to high blood pressure and heart disease. This is because of how it affects fluid balance in the blood. Table salt is around 40 percent sodium. Some amount of salt is important for health, but it’s easy to eat too much.

Is Ginger good for high blood pressure?

Ginger (rhizome of the perennial herb Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is a popular spice and is considered as an essential component of the kitchen pharmacy. It grows abundantly in the Indo-Pak subcontinent, and this region is the biggest exporter of ginger in the world.1 Ginger has been used since the ancient times as a food additive to impart its taste and smell and also for its therapeutic value in a wide variety of diseases, especially in the gastrointestinal disorders such as constipation, diarrhea, anorexia, colic, dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting, and also in motion sickness.2,3 The rhizome is known to have gingerol, shogaol, zingerone, and paradol as the pungent principles.4 The main aroma-defining component is zingiberol.5 Ginger is reported to possess anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, antimicrobial, hypoglycemic, antimigraine, molluscicidal, antischistosomal, anti-motion sickness, antioxidant, hepatoprotective, hypocholesterolemic, and antithrombic activities.6 Because of the antithrombic potential of ginger, it may interact with blood-thinning drugs such as warfarin and must be used carefully in patients with blood-clotting disorders.

  • The use of ginger in cardiovascular diseases has long been known.
  • Ginger is known to have a diuretic 7 and blood pressure (BP)-lowering effect.3,8 In the traditional medicine practice of Pakistan, herbalists prescribe ginger to hypertensive patients to be taken after dinner.
  • Interestingly a few studies have been carried out to explore the BP-lowering potential of ginger extract and its active constituents but produced conflicting results, 9-11 and the precise mode of action remains to be elucidated.

In this investigation, we report the BP-lowering effect of the crude extract of fresh ginger in anesthetized rats and the possible mode of action was explored using isolated cardiovascular preparations.

What are the best and worst foods to eat with high blood pressure?

People with high blood pressure can benefit from a diet that is low in added salts and sugars and limits the intake of red meats, processed foods, saturated fats, and alcohol. Instead, people can opt for plant-based foods, whole grains, and healthy fats.

  • Along with other measures, these foods can help manage blood pressure.
  • About 45% of adults in the United States have high blood pressure, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),
  • This may increase their risk of heart disease, stroke, and numerous other health problems.
  • The right diet can help a person control their blood pressure levels.

In this article, we present 50 foods and drinks that could contribute to high blood pressure, and we list some foods a person can include in their diet. We also provide some recipe ideas.