Why Are Breasts Sexualized In American Culture

The Sexualisation Of Breasts – What Has Caused It?

Whenever a photo of a model nursing her child appears on the front cover of a fashion magazine, it not only garners worldwide attention, but it also ignites extensive debate. If the same woman had posed without her child in a low-cut dress that exposed her cleavage, there would have been no headline, no viral sharing of the photograph, and no arguments about the issue. The practice of nursing in public is frowned upon due to the sexualization of women’s breasts, as well as breastfeeding itself.

What happened, and how did it happen?

What has caused the sexualisation of breasts?

The following are some insights on the factors that contribute to the sexualization of breasts, as well as suggestions for how we might normalize breastfeeding:

Sex sells

Breasts are a major business because sex is a profitable product. Women’s breasts may be found all over the place. On television, at the cinema, in publications, on billboards, and in other media, for example. Yes, breasts have been transformed into a sexualized commodity, and profit-hungry corporations will exploit them to the fullest extent possible. David Horsey created this cartoon.

The problem with porn

According to most experts, the addictive and dangerous character of porni is another factor contributing to the sexualization of women’s breasts in our culture. Porn addicts have a proclivity to view people as sexual objects. Unfortunately, as a result of easily available technology, the number of cases of addiction is on the rise. Is this the type of world in which we want to raise our children? How are we going to protect kids from all of this? See BellyBelly’s post on the conversation you MUST have with your children about pornography, which is located here.

Why women have breasts

What exactly is the genuine function of the breasts? What causes women to have them? In order to attract the other sex? In order to sell magazines? In order to get guys to have their cars washed at a certain carwash? Some people may wish to touch or fondle their breasts, but this is not the reason why women have breasts. The fundamental biological significance of a woman’s breasts is that they are responsible for feeding human newborns. There is simply nothing sexual about nursing a child. A woman breastfeeds her kid not to show off her breasts, not because she is an exhibitionist, and not in an attempt to turn the male species on.

Count the number of times you’ve seen nursing women strolling about with their tops off, flashing the general public, or shaking their lactating breasts in the faces of spectators.

Breastfeeding is done solely for the purpose of nourishing and nurturing her child.

Breastfeeding indiscreetly doesn’t exist

Some people believe that breastfeeding should be done ‘discreetly’ in public places because they believe it is associated with sex, while others disagree. What exactly does the term “discreet” imply? A woman should cover her entire chest, arms, and infant with a blanket, but should she cover her arms only? Would you be interested in eating this way? Is it possible that you’ve attempted to cover a baby while he or she is feeding? When you’re up against their flailing tiny arms, it’s difficult to win.

  1. Do you think it is appropriate for a nursing woman to leave a public area to nurse in her car or at a public restroom?
  2. In modern society, it is customary for women to dress in skimpy apparel and low-cut tops, and it is typical to see exposed and semi-exposed breasts on beaches, in movies, in advertisements, and in other places.
  3. When we talk about the need to nurse discreetly, what signals are we giving to girls and young women in particular?
  4. They believe that the natural, God-given act of nursing is something that others shouldn’t be able to witness.
  5. It’s nothing more than nursing a baby!
  6. In terms of how much of themselves they are willing to reveal when nursing in public, breastfeeding women have varied levels of comfort.
  7. Alternatively, some people choose to use a cover of some sort.
  8. If you don’t like it, don’t look at it any further.

It’s simply that straightforward. The offense of a given individual when supervising a nursing infant should never take precedence over feeding a baby in the manner prescribed by nature. There is no such thing as an indiscreet nursing situation. That’s the end of the narrative.

Appropriate role-modeling is important

Children require positive role models in which to grow up. Girls and young women need to be able to witness mothers nursing in a variety of settings, including cafés, restaurants, public transportation, football games, airplanes, and other places. They are the future’s moms in the making. Their comfort and confidence in their own flesh is what we want them to feel like they have. We want kids to be confident in their own bodies and to be proud of what their own bodies are capable of.

Breastfeeding and norms

Breastfeeding is the only method of feeding newborns that is biologically normal. However, being physiologically normal does not always imply being culturally normal. Breastfeeding is still not considered the cultural norm in our culture, and we all have a role to play in making this happen.

Make your opinion count – but make sure it’s an informed one

It is physiologically normal for newborns to be fed exclusively by breast milk. The fact is that being physiologically normal does not necessarily equate to being culturally acceptable. In order for nursing to become the cultural norm in our culture, we must all play a part in achieving this goal.

No, You’re Not ‘Hardwired’ To Stare At Women’s Breasts

You’ve probably heard about the Free the Nipple Picnic, which took place on January 17 in Brisbane and was described by one of its organizers as “simply a means for us to sit about in an open public location and feel that we can have our nipples free and have fantastic talks.” In the wake of Lina Esco’s 2014 video, “Free the Nipple,” a global movement has been launched to desexualize women’s breasts and give women the freedom to go topless in the same areas where it is appropriate for men and boys to do so.

Is this type of promotion, however, ludicrous in today’s hypersexualized porn culture?

On social media, the Brisbane picnic garnered the ire of hundreds of males who were upset that men were barred from attending, despite the fact that the event was designed to be a safe space for women to congregate free of “sexualisation.” Breasts are seen as sensual objects in contemporary Western culture, as evidenced by the growing popularity of breast augmentation surgery using silicone implants.

  1. The overwhelming perception of breasts as sexually attractive to the observer is at the root of most of the discomfort and humiliation around public nursing.
  2. “Some photographs of female breasts if they feature the nipple,” according to the site’s most recent nudity policy, but “shots of ladies actively engaged in nursing” are now permitted.
  3. The fact that breasts have not always been seen as irresistibly appealing at all moments in history and throughout all cultures is something that is frequently disregarded in conversations regarding their sexual attractiveness.
  4. These include the buttocks, legs, ankles, hair, and feet.
  5. Some of these body parts have no link to a woman’s ability to reproduce or care for her kids, as is sometimes argued to explain the current obsession with huge breasts and other female body features.
  6. The buttocks, rather than the breasts, are a more accurate indicator of a woman’s fertility.
  7. They also indicate pelvic size and are prominent while young, becoming less apparent with age.
  8. Black and Hispanic groups are the most likely to pursue buttock augmentation (implants), and hip hop music has provided us with hundreds of odesto huge “booties” to look at.

In the words of author Elizabeth Wilson, who wrote the 1985 book Adorned in Dreams: Fashion and Modernity: “I dreamed of being adorned in dreams.” In communities where members are known to dress in their underwear, it is claimed to be traditional to dress up for dance events and other occasions where sexual curiosity is expected to be piqued by the participants.

  1. A Rally is a picture by Sir John Lavery, an Irish artist, from 1885.
  2. Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons In today’s society, breasts are an example of concealment resulting in sexual attraction; nevertheless, there are additional cases that demonstrate that this process is not the product of a natural, “hardwired” need to be sexually attracted.
  3. In Victorian Britain, respectable ladies wore long skirts and dresses that covered their whole legs, including their toes and ankles.
  4. A large number of Muslim girls and women cover their hair while they are outside the home, and married women in some Jewish communities wear hats, scarves, or wigs to keep their own hair out of sight.
  5. These taboos on the public display of women’s ankles and hair demonstrate that the portions of women’s bodies that are deemed sexually alluring may alter depending on the time and location, and that concealing them simply adds to the attraction of the parts of women’s bodies that are banned.
  6. This is an important aspect to consider when considering the Free the Nipple campaign.
  7. None of this is intended to diminish the fact that many individuals find pleasure in the sight of breasts, or that women themselves frequently find sexual pleasure in their own breasts.
  8. Similarly, we may be perplexed as to why a Victorian woman could not stroll down the street with her calves exposed, and we may be perplexed as to how a picnic with a group of topless women could elicit such passionate debate in the future.

Michelle Smith, Research Fellow in English Literature at Deakin University, is an expert in the field. The original version of this article appeared on The Conversation. See the source article for more information.

On the rack: A cultural history of breasts

It’s difficult to be a boobs. Sure, breasts are revered as milk producers and as the peak of physical appeal, but the contemporary world hasn’t been kind to our female reproductive organs. Breasts, according to Florence Williams’ book “Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History,” are the organ in the human body that is most prone to tumor development. They “soak up pollutants like a pair of soft sponges” and pass on environmental contaminants to newborns through breast milk, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

  • As Williams points out, while we’ve “genetically modified our crops to be able to shield them from the deleterious effects of pesticides,” we haven’t yet found out how to “genetically alter our breasts,” he says.
  • Breast implants, to just one example, are more popular than ever: It is the most prevalent type of cosmetic surgery, surpassing even nose jobs and liposuction in terms of popularity.
  • The bulk of Williams’ book is devoted to these recent dramatic shifts, while she also discusses evolutionary fundamentals such as why we have them, what they’re composed of, and how they function as well.
  • It does go into technical terrain at times, which may put some readers to sleep, but generally, it is a much-needed look at why breasts are more important than we think, especially in our boob-obsessed world.
  • One of the most difficult issues raised by the book is the straightforward one of why women have breasts.
  • Interestingly, it’s a heated topic with a lot of participants.
  • There are no other animals in which the breasts are chosen for sexual selection outside humans.
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Humans’ mammary glands, located in the breast, have estrogen receptors, which are responsible for the production of fat.

Consequently, it is probable that while breasts are the outcome of natural selection, they have also played a role in sexual selection?

There is absolutely no question that a large number of males are really, extremely drawn to breasts!

It goes completely against conventional wisdom, but isn’t it conventional wisdom that hasn’t been proven?

It’s possible that some of these anthropologists are simply projecting their own opinions back into evolutionary periods, which would be a classic no-no, given our strong cultural prejudices against breasts.

So, in terms of male sexual choice, there is no such thing as a “perfect” breast?

Among males, there are many who like small- to medium-sized breasts, and there are a few who don’t appear to be very interested in breasts of any size.

Women with tiny breasts are equally as capable of feeding newborns as women with larger breasts, which is why these characteristics have persisted.

What was it like to be there?

I’d always considered my breasts to be a little on the large side.

They’re just so skilled at convincing women that they’re not good enough the way they are that so much of their profession is based on soft sell.

The first silicone breast implant was placed in a woman in 1962, marking 50 years since the procedure.

It was especially popular among women who earned their career performing on stage, such as go-go dancers, burlesque dancers, and topless dancers, as well as in Hollywood.

In the 1990s, there was an implant panic in which a large number of women experienced issues with their implants, leading to the FDA banning them for a period of 14 years.

As a matter of fact, more women are receiving implants now than they have ever been before – more than 300,000 every year.

What exactly is going on there?

Women’s bodies are becoming increasingly large, and their breasts are becoming increasingly large as well.

In fact, males are growing breasts at a higher rate than ever before, and male breast reduction surgery is becoming more popular by the day.

Those objects appear to be interacting with our breasts in some way.

I would say the same thing for the same reasons.

Girls are enduring a condition that is sometimes referred to as overnutrition.

You’re also seeing slender girls developing breasts early, which suggests that the obesity theory may not be a complete explanation for the situation.

To turn our attention away from breastfeeding and toward one of the functions of breasts that isn’t genuinely up for debate: how and why did lactation come to be?

It arose in the ancestor of mammals, most likely not as a food, but rather as an anti-infection chemical to protect against infection.

The current generation of breast milk is not only rich in nutritious components, but it is also rich in immune system-boosting compounds that scientists are only now beginning to comprehend.

It also appears to be brimming with bacteria, which suggests that it is either inoculating the infant’s immune system or training it as to which germs are healthy and which are toxic.

It’s the only food on the earth that was created specifically for consumption by humans.

What is your take on the argument about whether breasts are the best option?

Breast-feeding may be quite difficult.

In Western society, at least, it is relatively risk-free to be reared on a formula.

Because of the high concentration of pathogens in underdeveloped nations, formula isn’t a good choice while traveling to these areas.

From the perspective of public health, it makes sense to strongly promote the consumption of breast milk in underdeveloped nations.

In addition to positive entities, we find negative things in breast milk.

What is it about breasts and breast milk that is causing poisons to appear in such high concentrations?

Although a lot of people like fat, our breasts are among the fattiest organs we have, second only to our brains in terms of weight.

They’re highly effective at turning these chemicals into breast milk, according to research.

What about the possibility of transfer to breastfeeding infants?

Despite this, we don’t really know what the long-term health consequences of this will be.

It’s possible that we should attempt something different if these aren’t confirmed to be safe.

I’m really interested in what you think of sexualized initiatives to raise awareness about breast cancer, such as the “Save the Boobs” public service announcement, which featured a pair of bouncing bikini-clad breasts, and the proliferation of “I (love) boobies” wristbands.

I did like the fact that the advertisements attempted to target a younger audience, so there you have it. However, the more we can recognize the complexity of our breasts and the paradoxes that exist within them, the healthier we will be in the long run.

Sexualization of Breasts

Breasts are appealing to the majority of people. And, after all, why wouldn’t they? They’re gorgeous, soft, warm, and appealing organs that respond to the touch of a person’s hand. But, after all, aren’t they simply a glob of lard? Breasts have become increasingly attractive as a result of evolution. But at what point does this attraction become too much? What is it about breasts that is so openly sexualized? What is the reason behind their objectification? If breastfeeding in public is deemed immoral, why is it so?

Before you can answer these questions, you must first understand why breasts exist, as well as the science and history that behind them.

Table of Content

  • Final thoughts on the science of breasts, cultural history, causes of sexualization, Objectification, women sexualizing themselves versus society sexualizing them, the impact of social media, breastfeeding, and freeing the nipple.

Science Behind Breasts

Female breasts have an important function in the stimulation of sexual desire and reproduction. They are secondary sexual features, meaning that they arise during puberty or sexual maturity, in the same way as men’s facial hair grows out during adolescence. When female nipples are touched, they produce oxytocin, which is a hormone that makes us feel good about ourselves. As a result, the nipples are a significant erogenous region. Male nipples can also play a role in the stimulation of sexual desire.

  • But why don’t guys grow breasts in the same way as girls do?
  • To put it another way, the foetus stays gender-neutral throughout the development process.
  • It is not until the sexual reproductive portions of males begin to mature that the body undergoes the modifications that would eventually result in the development of breasts.
  • During adolescence, the female breasts develop milk ducts and milk glands, which are responsible for providing food for a newborn in the form of milk by nursing after the pregnancy is completed.

Cultural History

Breasts were not previously seen as a source of concern in the same way that they are today. In many indigenous communities, it was extremely common to see women with their breasts exposed. Pre-Islamic societies in the Middle East and sections of India, Thailand, and Indonesia, as well as much of Africa, were characterized by the absence of a top. While virgin women in nations such as Laos wore their clothes completely, married women with children were allowed to bare their breasts in public since breastfeeding was regarded to be a nonsexual activity in such cultures.

Along with the growth in popular western culture, the belief that concealing one’s nipples and areola (a tiny circular patch of skin that includes, in particular, the ring of pigmented skin encircling a man’s nipple) as a symbol of modesty grew increasingly popular.

Female breasts have been depicted in art and visual media throughout history, including sculptures, paintings, photographs, and other types of photography.

The practice of toplessness is also permitted on several private beaches and resorts.

If we accept the fact that breasts are genuinely gender-neutral, aside from the variable amounts of tissue present, and that they have been tolerated in numerous societies throughout history, what is it that has led them to become sexualized?

Cause Of Sexualization

The patriarchal structure of most civilizations has been thoroughly entrenched for centuries. The idea that males are superior to women is instilled in the brains of children from an early age. Women are regarded as inferiors, which leads to discrimination, objectification, and disrespect for their beliefs, views, or consent. Women are treated as inferiors because they are perceived as inferior. In a patriarchal society, it is easy to ignore the fact that female breasts are not for sexual purposes but are instead used for breastfeeding; even though they are erogenous, this does not indicate that they should be sexualized.

Sex sells

Breasts have been employed in advertising all throughout the world, whether in newspapers, billboards, or television shows. Businesses have utilized breasts to promote items and services that are completely unrelated. Breasts have been transformed into a sexualized product for businesses all around the world. Advertisements have also been shown to promote gender stereotypes, which is humiliating and eventually leads to the objectification of women.

Porn

Rather from treating one another as persons, pornstars regard one another as things. The objectification that results in sexualization is the cause of sexualization. When you see enough porn, it becomes addicting, and the constant erroneous depictions lead to sexualization. Furthermore, the younger generation receives a greater amount of sexual education via porn sites than they do in school, and as a result, they may develop an erroneous perception of sexual practices.

Shaming

Women and girls who dress in exposing clothing are considered unworthy of respect. Early on in life, even before they grow breasts, young girls are trained to conceal their breasts, and those who do not do so are ridiculed. This objectification and sexualization of breasts is caused by the fact that they are something that women must conceal.

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Objectification

Objectification is defined as the act of reducing a person to the status of a simple item or a thing. Sexual objectification is defined as the act of treating another person as a sexual object for the purposes of sexual desire. Both male and female bodies are frequently sexualized in popular culture. However, they each had two very different blowouts. Male abs, for example, are perceived as sexualized, yet they are also powerful, dominant, and attractive. Female breasts, on the other hand, are regarded as sexualized, however they are also objectified and shamed.

Breasts are viewed by men as though they were some sort of prohibited entity, similar to a child anticipating the opening of a gift.

Women, on the other hand, are imbued with feelings of uncertainty and humiliation just because they have breasts. The website inspiringwomen.co.za is the source of this information.

Women Sexualizing herself vs Society Sexualizing her

Self-sexualization is the deliberate practice of participating in actions that are intended to make one look sexually desirable. Self-sexualization is a conscious decision. The woman is in command of her own story, and it serves as a vehicle for her own self-expression. It may be empowering for certain women. So, isn’t self-sexualization a form of discrimination against oneself? No! It is a legitimate right of a woman to be viewed in the manner in which she wishes. In that case, if it’s OK for women to sexualize themselves, why isn’t it acceptable for others to do the same?

  • It leads to the monetization of breasts, with little respect for the dignity of the women who bear the breasts in question.
  • Social media plays a significant part in one’s life and can have an influence on the creation of one’s identity, gender, and sexuality, among other things.
  • It has the potential to generate a false picture of one’s physical size, looks, luxurious lifestyle, and so on, leading to extravagant expectations and concerns about one’s actual self.
  • Females are frequently slutshamed for wearing exposing clothing or publishing stuff that is deemed inappropriate by the general public.
  • It has been shown that this has a negative impact on the mental health of these women and girls, according to studies.
  • As opposed to seeing women as persons, they are depicted as sexual objects, which has the potential to promote sexualization of breasts.
  • The nipple is something that both males and females have, but only females are required to conceal it.
  • All of the cleavage, underboob, and skintight apparel are okay, which is completely counter-intuitive to the situation.

Breastfeeding

It is the major function of the breasts and the natural manner by which a newborn obtains nutrition that it is called breastfeeding. There are many social stigmas associated with it in many civilizations, even now. Nursing mothers must often feed their children, including in public places such as shopping malls, places of employment, or restaurants where they are not expected to do so. Many people despise moms who breastfeed their children in public, labeling them as “exhibitionists,” “indecent,” or “immodest.” But she’s only doing it to feed her child!

It sets a mother behind, wastes her time, and brings shame upon her only to provide for her child’s nutritional needs.

The scientifically proved reality is that ‘breast is best,’ yet it appears that this is not the case in public.

Obtainable via USATODAY.com Fortunately, many nations throughout the world recognize this, and laws have been enacted to protect women’s rights to breastfeed in public places.

However, legalization does not magically transform people’s deeply ingrained attitudes, and nursing in public continues to be looked upon by many people.

Free the Nipple

A movement founded by filmmaker Lina Esco to fight against laws limiting female toplessness, public nursing, and social media prohibitions on female nipple exposure, Free The Nipple is a grassroots campaign that has gained traction. Campaigners say that it should not only be legally permissible, but also culturally acceptable. With this initiative, females will be given the freedom to dress in their underwear without fear of being harassed or judged by their peers. Femen is an activist group dedicated to defending women’s rights, and they are also proponents of this movement.

The activists contend that breasts are secondary sexual organs, rather than “genitals” or “private parts,” and that this should be recognized.

Gender inequality, according to the ad, is manifested in the inability for women to expose their nipples in public settings.

Toplessness serves not only as a platform for this campaign, but also as a protest and awareness-raising tool to de-sexualize breasts, according to the organizers.

Final Words

Free The Nipple is a grassroots campaign led by filmmaker Lina Esco that works to overturn laws that restrict female toplessness, public nursing, and social media bans on female nipple exposure. Campaigners say that it should not only be legal but also culturally acceptable. With this initiative, females will be given the freedom to dress in their underwear without fear of being harassed or criticized. It is also supported by Femen, an activist organisation dedicated to the protection of women’s rights.

They contend that breasts are secondary sexual organs, rather than “genitals” or “private parts,” and therefore they should not be considered such.

The campaign emphasizes that not being allowed to expose one’s nipples in public, particularly for women, is a kind of gender discrimination.

Using toplessness to raise awareness and protest against breast sexualization serves several purposes for this campaign, including providing a platform for the movement.

Boobs Are Sexualized, but How Important Are They to Women’s Sexual Pleasure?

The improper sexualization of breasts has long been a major source of concern for feminist rhetoricians. Breasts may be secondary sex organs, but they are not intrinsically sexual in nature, according to the argument. Breasts have a role in reproduction, such as producing milk and nursing a newborn. Although boobs have been sexualized in popular culture — from applauding “beautiful” cleavage to shameing women who nurse in public to restricting women’s nipples on social media – they have become a privately celebrated and, as a result, publicly controversial organ in society.

  1. Do breasts, on the other hand, have a part in the sexual pleasure experienced by people who have them?
  2. Like, it’s simply a sack of fat you’re fondling, or something like that.
  3. Although it does nothing for me, I don’t mind it as long as my companions are enjoying themselves.
  4. To be completely honest, I’d prefer have their hands and tongues occupied somewhere else.” While the sexualization of breasts may be off-putting to some, it is also the reason that some women find their own breasts to be arousing, both during and outside of sex, according to certain studies.
  5. The days when I dress up and my cleavage is evident or my boobs appear raised make me feel attractive and confident, says the author.
  6. “I play with my boobs or squeeze them a lot while I’m staring in the mirror, whether I’m showering, dressing up, or just sitting around doing nothing.
  7. “When I’m having sexual relations with a man, I enjoy it when he touches my boobs, fondles them, or just plays with them.

“I get the impression that this arousal is milder and just serves to increase the pleasure of intercourse,” she explained.

It’s an excellent prelude.” In a related article on The Swaddle, Sabyasachi believes he has reinvented the boobs.

Researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson discovered that when female subjects were aroused, their breast volume and the size of their areola (darkened regions around their nipples) increased.

Nursing also resulted in the production of the feel-good hormone oxytocin in their brains, which is also released during sexual encounters and has been connected to sexual desire; Masters and Johnson discovered three women who had had orgasm while nursing, as a result of breast stimulation.

Another research of 121 lactating women found that only 11.3 percent reported having sexual desire as a result of nipple stimulation while breastfeeding, with the remaining 62.65 percent reporting having no sexual desire during or after breastfeeding.

In another research, 153 women were questioned about the sexual pleasure they had as a result of breast stimulation, and 82% of them agreed that it increased their arousal.

Men were also questioned as part of the study; out of 148 participants, 51.7 percent reported getting aroused by partners who stimulated their own nipples.

It is possible that whether or not a sexually active individual experiences pleasure from breast and nipple stimulation is dependent on their perception of the societal sexualization of boobs, as well as their sensitivity to certain forms of stimulation, among other factors.

Suguna G., 23, asked, “How do you think individuals acquire fetishes and fantasies?” Suguna feels her sexual reaction to breast stimulation is a function of both how she is seen and her biology, according to Suguna. “It’s all in the head,” says the author.

Written By Rajvi Desai

The improper sexualization of breasts has long been a source of concern for feminist discourse. Breasts may be secondary sex organs, but they are not intrinsically sexual in nature, according to the argument. Breasts have a role in reproduction, such as producing milk and nursing a newborn child. Although boobs have been sexualized in popular culture — from applauding “beautiful” cleavage to criticizing women who nurse in public to forbidding women’s nipples on social media – they have become a privately celebrated and, as a result, a publicly forbidden organ in our society as a result.

  1. But, for those who have them, do their breasts play a part in the pleasure they derive from sexual relations?
  2. So it’s exactly like you’re fondling around a sack of fat, right?
  3. In sex, Simran, 23, expresses her dissatisfaction with breast stimulation.
  4. To be completely honest, I’d prefer have their hands and tongues occupied someplace else.
  5. Ankita, who is 23 years old, believes that a sexual perspective of boobs is something that is ingrained in her cultural background.
  6. In addition, she finds it moderately stimulating to stare at the boobs of other women.
  7. Although pleasant, the sensation isn’t so intense that I’m tempted to masturbate in response to it.
  8. In a relationship, I enjoy it when the other person caresses my boobs, fondles them, or simply plays with them.
  9. According to her, “I believe that this arousal is milder and that it just serves to increase the enjoyment of the encounter.” “The only thing that can turn you off is breast stimulation after a time.” The foreplay is beneficial.
  10. In the eyes of research, breast stimulation and its association with sexual desire may be significant.
  11. They also discovered that when female subjects were aroused, their nipples grew in size and became erect.

Nursing also resulted in the release of the feel-good hormone oxytocin in their brains, which is also released during sexual encounters and has been linked to sexual arousal; Masters and Johnson discovered three women who had experienced orgasm while nursing, which they attributed to breast stimulation.

  1. Other research on lactating women found that only 11.3 percent reported having sexual desire owing to nipple stimulation while breastfeeding, with the remaining 62.65 percent reporting having no sexual desire either during or after breastfeeding.
  2. 153 women were polled on the sexual pleasure they had as a result of breast stimulation, and 82% said it increased their level of arousal.
  3. Out of a total of 148 males who participated in the study, 51.7 percent admitted to becoming aroused by partners who stimulated their own nipples while they were sleeping.
  4. It is possible that whether or not a sexually active individual experiences pleasure from breast and nipple stimulation is dependent on their perception of the societal sexualization of boobs, as well as their sensitivity to certain sorts of stimulation, among other things.

Suguna G., 23, asked, “How do you think individuals acquire fetishes and fantasies?” Suguna feels her sexual reaction to breast stimulation is a function of both how she is seen and her biology, according to Suguna G. All is in the mind, as they say.

Our Complicated Relationship with Breasts

This story was retrieved from the archives of our affiliate. We have what you would term a “problem” with boobs in the United States of America. See, the problem is that we aren’t sure how we feel about them at the moment. Aside from being surrounded by hyper-sexualized pictures of women, their chests heaving in décolletage-revealing clothing or, more titillating (yeah, I said it), covered by nothing at all, we’re also surrounded by hyper-sexualized images of males. There’s something about seeing so much flesh, whether it’s on the covers of magazines like Playboy or something more mixed-company-friendly like Cosmopolitan, on the Internet, in movies, on late-night cable television, or even in our own homes in human form, that gets to us.

  • Distaste, concern about what all this breast-obsession is doing to women, anxiety about exploitation, and even concern about how one should feel about one’s breasts are all possible emotions.
  • BOOBS.
  • However, just as there are broad generalizations regarding our feelings about boobs, there are also broad generalizations concerning boobs in and of their self.
  • It always does, doesn’t it?
  • The subject of breasts is the topic of discussion on the Internet on Thursday.
  • However, the difficulties associated with the issue of boobs, as well as our perceptions of them, are not new.
  • Because this isn’t a piece about breasts, but rather about motherhood, and the question on the cover is one that parents have had enough of at this stage in their parenting careers.
  • The magazine and book editors encourage authors to keep submitting their work.
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Among the more shocking examples are Hanna Rosin’s 2009 article in The Atlantic, ” The Case Against Breast-Feeding,” Lisa Belkin’s parenting blog post ” Is Nursing Creepy?” and Terry Richardson’s normally scandalousVice photograph of a mother breastfeeding her child while armed with a pistol This cover just serves to put it even more “in our faces”—while we recognize that it is no longer acceptable to discuss how a breast-feeding mother with a baby makes us feel “weird,” we can express our displeasure with this mother, who appears to be raising a grown-up child, with no difficulty.

  1. This is outrageous, and as a result, it is ripe for uproar!
  2. Meanwhile, we are overjoyed to catch a peek of the “sexified” breast in the midst of mainstream culture.
  3. We are obsessed with the cleavage of news anchors (even as we are secretly delighted by it, and use it to start trollsome Internet discourses).
  4. America is obsessed with boobs.
  5. Of course, they must be utilized in the proper location and at the appropriate time, and only if they are being used for the purpose for which they were designed.
  6. That’s where the problem resides.
  7. What is it about the youngster that has us so concerned, and why are we anticipating mockery or years of treatment for him?
  8. When we see anything like this, why do we gape in terror and turn away, feeling uncomfortable, or protect the eyes of our innocent children at the supermarket?
  9. In addition to the body parts engaged in intercourse and from which, on sometimes, kids are conceived 9 months after conception, there are other body parts to consider.
  10. These things frighten us because we don’t like the idea of “sex” and “motherhood” being associated with one other.

That kind of makes our brains feel like they are about to explode. As you can see, we warned you it would be difficult. Tatiana Morozova’s photo is courtesy of Shutterstock. This item comes from the archives of our partner, The Wire, which you can read here.

r/AskAnthropology – Is there any society that does not sexualize breasts?

This material was retrieved from the archives of our partner’s organization. Boobs are something of a “issue” in the United States, to put it mildly. See, the problem is that we’re not quite sure how we feel about them. Aside from being surrounded by hyper-sexualized pictures of women with chests heaving in décolletage-revealing clothing or, even more titillating (yeah, I said it), covered by nothing at all, we’re also surrounded by hyper-sexualized images of males. There’s something about seeing so much flesh, whether it’s on the covers of magazines like Playboy or something more mixed-company-friendly like Cosmopolitan, on the Internet, in movies, on late-night cable TV, or even in our own homes in human form, that affects us.

  • Distaste, concern about what all this breast-obsession is doing to women, concern about exploitation, and even concern about one’s own feelings about one’s breasts are all possible emotions to have.
  • BOOBS.
  • However, just as there are broad generalizations regarding our feelings about boobs, there are also broad generalizations concerning boobs in and of their own right.
  • Every time it happens.
  • It is breasts that are causing controversy on the Internet on Thursday.
  • In terms of the issue of boobs and how we perceive them, however, there is nothing new to be discovered.
  • How many competing comparisons to various parenting approaches (French, American, helicopter, lax, awful, eternal breast-feeding, etc.) will our culture have to withstand, similar to boob comparisons.
  • Nursing has always been a source of debate, especially when it comes to very young children, because it combines both motherhood and sexuality, which makes it a contentious subject.

This cover, on the other hand, puts it even more “in our faces”—while we recognize that it is no longer acceptable to discuss how a breast-feeding mother with an infant makes us feel “creepy,” we can express our displeasure with this mother, who appears to be raising a grown-up child, with no difficulty.

  • An online chorus of “ew, yuck” may be heard.
  • Between now and then, we are delighted to catch a peek of the “sexified” breast in the wider world.
  • Cleavage is something we obsess with in the journalism industry (even as we are secretly delighted by it, and use it to start trollsome Internet discourses).
  • boobs are quite popular in America.
  • Of course, they should only be utilized in the proper context and at the appropriate time, and only if they are being used for the intended purpose.
  • That’s when the problem begins to surface.
  • What is it about the youngster that has us so concerned, and why are we expecting derision or years of treatment ahead of him?
  • When we see anything like this, why do we gape in terror and turn away, feeling uncomfortable, or protect the eyes of our innocent children at the supermarket?
  • In addition to the body parts participating in sex and from which, on sometimes, kids are conceived nine months after conception, there are other body parts involved in sex.
  • The fact that “sex” and “motherhood” are emanating from the same source makes us uncomfortable, therefore we avoid these situations.

They are unable to be separated, though, which is a big irony for all time. We’re a little bit taken aback by this. We warned you it would be difficult. Tatiana Morozova contributed this image to Shutterstock.com. It is from our partner The Wire’s archive, and it is republished with permission.

America’s sexualization of breasts is so pervasive even other women think public breastfeeding is gross

After recently admitting that she has been harassed for nursing in public, Mila Kunis joins a long list of celebrities who have experienced similar treatment. Breastfeeding mothers, whether they are celebrities or not, continue to be criticized for nursing their children in public. Although public nursing has become increasingly acceptable in our sexually obsessed society, the people who shame people for doing so aren’t always what you’d expect. A quick Google search for “breastfeeding in public” turns up numerous reports of women being bullied while breastfeeding, being asked to feed their babies in bathroom stalls, or worse, being asked to leave the premises altogether.

  1. Breastfeeding mothers have battled with shame for a long time, long before social media and citizen journalism brought it to public attention.
  2. My daughter and I were sitting in the window seat, and I didn’t believe anyone could see us,” said Gabrielle Zucker Acevedo, a mother of two.
  3. “I didn’t say yes.” Women appear to be among the most egregious offenders when it comes to the public exhibition of nursing shaming game.
  4. When I first started nursing him, I received numerous glares from elderly people.” If you pay attention, you’ll realize that there is more than one thing in common between these women’s tales (and many more like them): They were humiliated in front of other ladies.
  5. Because I am both a consumer of social media and the online community manager for a pro-breastfeeding non-profit organization, I can attest to the fact that breastfeeding in public is not only considered immodest, disgusting, or otherwise impolite by men.
  6. Exclamations such as “Where’s your modesty?!?” and “Cover up!” resound throughout the room.
  7. The logic in this situation is perplexing.
  8. How is it that a simple biological imperative, despite all of our progress on feminist issues, continues to be so stigmatized?

Amy Bentley argues in her book Inventing Baby Food: Taste, Health, and the Industrialization of the American Diet that distaste for public breastfeeding in the United States began with the sexualization of female breasts in the nineteenth century and was accelerated by the rise in the popularity of processed baby food that occurred around the same time period.

In contemporary American culture, breasts have come to be associated with sex.

Therefore, while advertisements and billboards can reveal women’s breast tissue, new mothers are prohibited from doing so.

Moreover, they are frequently used as a yardstick by which many (but not all) women evaluate and validate their own worth.

I believe that the debate over public breastfeeding has drawn attention to the pervasiveness of patriarchal expectations, as well as the way in which they pit us against one another.

Feminists must keep this in mind.

Breastfeeding moms who have become activists—known as lactivists—have staged protests and nursing flash mobs all over the world, from shopping malls in Australia and Hong Kong to the streets of the United Kingdom and Argentina, for years.

These types of protests assist in subverting the sexual objectification of breasts while also fostering a sense of community, which is desperately needed in our society today.

Nursing in plain sight is neither unsanitary nor impolite, and it is encouraged. Please understand that we live in a culture that is comfortable with exploiting breasts to sell burgers for the sake of it. What kind of image do you want people to have of your body?

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