Which Of The Following Is Described In The Chapter As An Example Of Gender Diversity In A Culture

Stereotypes and Gender Roles – Culture and Psychology

Because we place so much emphasis on gender in our culture, many of our gender stereotypes are quite strong (BiglerLiben, 2007). For example, children learn at an early age that there are different expectations for males and girls compared to other children. Gender roles relate to the role or actions that a person learns that are acceptable for their gender and are decided by the prevalent cultural norms in a certain society or culture. In cross-cultural research, it has been discovered that children are aware of gender roles by the age of two or three, and can name the gender of others as well as classify things into gender groups.

Negative punishments, such as being criticized, bullied, marginalized, or rejected by their peers, may be met with when youngsters do not comply to the acceptable gender role for their culture.

Boys, in particular, are subjected to a great deal of scorn because of their gender nonconformity (Coltrane and Adams, 2008; Kimmel, 2000) Our gender roles have become a fixed part of our personality by the time we are adults, and we tend to believe a lot of negative gender stereotypes.

In care-related jobs such as child care, health care, and social work, women outnumber males by a significant margin.

  • It is possible that adherence to these vocational gender norms is a manifestation of societal expectations rather than a reflection of personal desire (Diamond, 2002).
  • With data from 30 nations, Williams and Best (1982) undertook multiple cross-cultural studies of gender stereotypes, which they published in 1982.
  • Males have been found to be connected with stronger and more active qualities than females, according to additional study (Best, 2001); nevertheless, new research suggests that culture influences how some gender stereotypes are viewed.
  • These findings provide credence to the idea that cultural values may have a moderating effect on gender stereotypes.
  • According to gender schema theory, children are active learners who primarily socialize themselves and actively arrange others’ behavior, activities, and traits into gender categories, which are referred to as schemas.
  • People of all ages are more likely to recall actions and traits that are compatible with their schema than they are to recall behaviors and attributes that are inconsistent with their schema.
  • They are also prone to misremembering information that is inconsistent with the schema.
  • Gender schemas get stronger and stronger over time as a result of just recalling information that is compatible with the schema.
  • Children are praised and reinforced when they behave in accordance with gender norms, and they are penalized when they behave in contravention of gender roles.

Social learning theory has received less support than gender schema theory, although research has shown that parents do promote gender-appropriate play and frequently reinforce cultural gender norms in their children’s lives.

What Is Gender Dysphoria?

Gender Dysphoria is a psychological condition that affects both men and women. In the context of gender identity, the term “transgender” refers to a person whose sex assigned at birth (i.e. the sex given by a physician at birth, which is often based on external genitalia) does not correspond to their gender identity (i.e., one’s psychological understanding of their gender). Occasionally, transgender persons will suffer from “gender dysphoria,” which is defined as psychological pain caused by a mismatch between the sex given at birth and the gender identity that the person has chosen for themselves.

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Those who identify as transgender may seek gender affirmation in a variety of ways, including social affirmation (such as changing one’s name and pronouns), legal affirmation (such as changing gender markers on one’s government-issued documents), medical affirmation (such as pubertal suppression or gender-affirming hormones), and/or surgical affirmation (e.g., vaginoplasty, facial feminization surgery, breast augmentation, masculine chest reconstruction, etc.).

  1. It is important to note that not all transgender persons will seek gender affirmation in all fields, since these are very personal and distinct decisions for each individual.
  2. When compared to gender identification, which relates to one’s internal perception of their gender, gender expression refers to the way in which one displays themselves to the world in a gendered manner.
  3. Such expectations are culturally determined and differ from one culture to another throughout time and space.
  4. Having a variety of gender expressions, much as having a variety of gender identities, is not indicative of a mental illness.
  5. It is the categories of persons to whom one is sexually attracted that is referred to as one’s sexual orientation.

Diagnosis

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) 1designates gender dysphoria as a single umbrella diagnosis with distinct specific criteria for children, adolescents, and adults, according to age.

When it comes to adolescents and adults, the DSM-5 defines gender dysphoria as a marked incongruence between one’s experienced/expressed gender and one’s given gender that lasts for at least six months and is characterized by at least two of the following symptoms:

  • The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) 1designates gender dysphoria as a single overarching diagnosis with distinct specific criteria for children, adolescents, and adults, as well as for both. When it comes to adolescents and adults, the DSM-5 defines gender dysphoria as a marked incongruence between one’s experienced/expressed gender and one’s given gender that lasts for at least 6 months and is evidenced by at least two of the following characteristics:

It is also necessary for the disorder to be accompanied with clinically substantial distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other relevant areas of functioning in order to fulfill the criteria for the diagnosis to be made. For the purposes of the DSM-5, gender dysphoria in children is defined as a marked incongruence between a person’s experienced/expressed gender and their given gender that lasts for at least 6 months and is exhibited by at least six of the following (one of which must be the first criterion):

  • One’s intense desire to be of the other gender or one’s insistence on being of the other gender (or some other alternative gender other than one’s ascribed gender)
  • The wearing of only typical masculine clothes and a significant opposition to the wearing of typical feminine clothing in boys (assigned gender)
  • Or the wearing of only typical masculine clothing and no objection to the wearing of typical feminine clothing in girls (assigned gender). In make-believe or fantasy play, a strong predilection for cross-gender roles is expressed
  • The possession of a strong predilection for the toys, games, or activities that are stereotypically used or participated in by the opposite gender
  • A great fondness for playmates who are the opposite gender to oneself
  • Strong rejection of typically masculine toys, games, and activities, as well as a strong avoidance of rough-and-tumble play in boys (assigned gender)
  • Or in girls (assigned gender), a strong rejection of typically feminine toys, games, and activities
  • One’s sexual anatomy is something that they despise deeply
  • Strong desire for physical sex features that correspond to one’s experienced gender
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In addition, the disorder must be accompanied with clinically substantial distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other relevant areas of functioning, just as it is with the diagnostic criteria for adolescents and adults. Treatment

Treatment

The support provided to persons suffering from gender dysphoria may involve an open-ended examination of their feelings and experiences of gender identity and expression, without the therapist having any pre-defined gender identity or expression conclusion that is preferred to the other outcome. 2Ethical concerns have been raised about psychological attempts to coerce a transgender person to become cisgender (also known as gender identity conversion initiatives or so-called “gender identity conversion therapy”).

  1. Individuals who practice social affirmation may use pronouns, names, and other aspects of gender expression that are consistent with their gender identity, among other things.
  2. For teenagers with gender dysphoria, medical affirmation may involve pubertal suppression, while for older adolescents and adults, gender-affirming hormones such as estrogen and testosterone may be used to help them feel more confident.
  3. Medical affirmation is not suggested for youngsters under the age of eighteen months.
  4. 7, 8Family and social rejection of transgender identity are among the most significant determinants of mental health disorders in transgender individuals.
  5. Support groups for parents of children and teenagers who are transgender may be of great assistance.
  6. Challenges/Complications

Challenges/Complications

Those who identify as transgender face a high level of stigmatization, discrimination, and victimization, which can lead to a poor self-image and an increased risk of developing various mental health conditions. 10 Transgender people have a greater risk of victimization and hate crimes than the general public, according to research. The suicide rate among transgender persons is significantly greater than the rate among the general population. 11 When it comes to bullying and prejudice at school, transgender children and teenagers are frequently the targets.

Interventions are frequently required to ensure that educational settings are safe and affirming. It is also possible that transgender persons would experience difficulties in obtaining proper health care and insurance coverage for relevant services.

Those who identify as transgender face a high level of stigmatization, discrimination, and victimization, which can lead to a poor self-image and an increased risk of developing various mental health conditions. 10 When compared to the general public, transgender people are at a higher risk of being victimized and hated. Compared to the general population, transgender persons have much higher suicide rates. 11 When it comes to bullying and prejudice, transgender children and teenagers are frequently the targets.

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The ability to obtain adequate health care and insurance coverage for associated treatments for transgender persons may also be difficult for them to obtain.

  • Cisgender is a term used to describe a person whose gender identification is consistent with the sex given to them at birth in a conventional sense. Individuals who have gender identities and/or expressions that differ from predicted developmental norms are referred to as being “gender varied.” Included in this category are persons who identify as various genders or as having no gender at all. Gender dysphoria is a concept defined in the DSM-5 as clinically significant distress or impairment caused by a strong desire to be of a different gender, which may include a desire to change primary and/or secondary sex characteristics. Gender dysphoria is a concept defined in the DSM-5 as clinically significant distress or impairment caused by a strong desire to be of a different gender. Not all transgender or gender variant persons suffer dysphoria
  • In fact, just a few do. Gender expression is the outer presentation of a person’s gender identity, which may or may not correspond to their inner gender identity depending on cultural and social expectations. When a person expresses their gender, their physical qualities are taken into consideration, as well as their clothing, accessories, grooming, voice/speech patterns and conversational habits, among other things. Person’s inner feeling of being a girl/woman, boy/man, a combination of both, or something different, including having no gender identity at all, is referred to as gender identity. This may or may not correlate to the gender assigned at the time of conception. Individuals who identify as neither girl/woman nor boy/man are referred to as nonbinary
  • This is a word used by some to describe their gender identification. At birth, a person’s gender and sexual orientation are assigned: Individuals are traditionally classified as “female,” “male,” or “intersex” based on anatomical and/or biological characteristics (external genitalia and/or internal reproductive organs) and/or hormone levels (sex chromosomes and/or hormone levels). Although the terms “sex” and “gender” are sometimes used interchangeably, they refer to two separate things. It is preferable to make a clear distinction between sex, gender identity, and gender expression, and to avoid drawing generalizations about a person based on their understanding of the other three traits. This is frequently referred to as AFAB (assigned female at birth) or AMAB (assigned male at birth), respectively. Individuals with whom a person has emotional, physical, and/or romantic bonds are classified according to their sexual orientation. Transgender is an umbrella word used to describe persons whose gender identification does not correspond to the gender they were assigned at birth in the conventional sense. A person whose gender identification is binary and not typically related with the gender assigned at birth may also be referred to as a transgender person.

References

Review by a physician Authored by:Jack Turban, M.D, MHS November 2020 –

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