What Is The Culture Of Europe

Europe – People

Before the appearance of modern humans in Europe around 45,000–43,000 years ago, a small population of now-extinct hominin species (seeHominidae) inhabited in the region. At various points during the prehistoric era, the continent was subjected to continuous waves of immigration from Asia. Large numbers of individuals have moved to the United States from other continents, primarily Africa and Asia, over the modern period, particularly since the mid-20th century. Despite this, Europe continues to be the primary homeland of numerous European peoples in the modern day.

Heidelberger Kongress und Tourismus GmbH is a company based in Heidelberg, Germany.

Cultural patterns

A number of “ethnic types” among European peoples have been identified, although they are just selectively selected physical characteristics that have only a limited descriptive and statistical significance at the best of times. Local language and other cultural distinctions across regions are well-known, and they have had a significant impact on the social and political life of European countries. These distinctions set Europe apart from other newly colonized areas, such as the United States, Canada, and Australia, which were just recently discovered.

  • Its numerous states, some of which had been in existence for a long time, presented another polarizing aspect that was compounded by modern nationalistic feelings.
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc.
  • A series of efforts to organize groups of nations into military and trade organizations, particularly following World War II, resulted in more expansive unitary alliances, but with basic contrasts between the east and the west.
  • During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Soviet bloc (including the Soviet Union itself), the reconciliation between east and west, and the establishment and growth of the European Union shifted this trend significantly (EU).
  • There are approximately 160 culturally distinct groups in Europe.
  • As a starting point, each group is distinguished by a certain degree of self-recognition among its members, however the basis for this collective identity differs from group to group.
  • The presence of a distinct language or dialect is the foundation of collective identity for the vast majority of communities.

On the other hand, certain peoples may speak the same language yet still consider themselves to be incompatible with one another due of religious differences.

Some groups may speak the same language, but they may be geographically separated from one another due to their divergent historical paths.

Even while living inside the same state, certain communities may speak the same language and practice the same religion, yet they will stay unique from one another due to their separate historical links.

Ethnographers have divided the key European cultural groupings into 21 cultural zones, each of which represents a distinct subset of the whole.

Although individuals within a main group are typically aware of their cultural links, the many groups within an ethnographically established culture area are not necessarily aware of their cultural relationships to one another on a conscious level.

This is especially true in the field of Balkanculture, as previously stated. On the other hand, those living in the Scandinavian and German (German-language cultural sectors are far more conscious of their connection to bigger regional cultures.

Languages

Romance, Germanic, and Slavic languages are the three major divisions that can be found within the complex of European languages: All three languages are descended from a common Indo-European ancestor spoken by the first Europeans who arrived in Europe from southern Asia. The Romance languages, which include French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, and Romanian, as well as lesser-known languages such as Occitan (Provençal) in southern France, Catalan in northeastern Spain and Andorra, and Romanshin southern Switzerland, predominate in western and Mediterranean Europe and includeFrench, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, and Romanian.

  • The Germanic languages can be found throughout central, northern, and northwestern Europe, as well as in Scandinavia.
  • Despite the fact that English is a Germanic language, approximately half of its lexicon has Romance origins.
  • These languages are often split into three groups: those from the West, those from the East, and those from the South.
  • Russian, Ukrainian, and Belarusian are the three East Slavic languages.

Other languages

In addition to the three major divisions of Indo-European languages, there are three minor divisions that deserve to be mentioned. Greece and Cyprus are both home to the modern Greek language, which is also spoken by the inhabitants of other eastern Mediterranean islands. Formerly prevalent older varieties of the language were previously found throughout the eastern and southern beaches of the Mediterranean, in southern peninsular Italy and in the Italian island of Sicily. Modern Latvian and Lithuanian are both members of the Baltic linguistic family.

  1. The Roma people of Europe speak the distinctive Romany language, which has its origins in the Indo-European branch of languages that is related to the Indic languages.
  2. Celtic languages once dominated central and western Europe, with a stronghold in the German Rhineland as its epicenter.
  3. Surviving Celtic languages include Cornish, Welsh, Irish, Scots Gaelic, Manx-, and Breton-languages.
  4. It has only been preserved in the Albanian language.
  5. The Basque language of the western Pyrenees is the only example of this type of language in Western Europe, and its roots are unknown.
  6. The languages of Finland, Sami, Estonia, and Hungary are all members of theUralic language family, which also has representatives in the middleVolga River region.

Turkic languages are spoken in parts of the Balkans and Caucasus areas, as well as in southern Russia, and are descended from the Turkic people.

Culture

The European Union aims to protect and promote Europe’s shared cultural legacy, as well as to support and promote the arts and creative industries throughout the continent. The European Year of Cultural Heritage, for example, is committed to making this dynamic and diverse culture more accessible to everyone through a series of specific activities. Many EU initiatives, including education, research, social policy, regional development, and foreign relations, use elements of culture as part of their overall design.

EU policy collaboration on culture is encouraged between national governments and international organizations, according to the European Union.

  • Culture-related priority issues for the EU
  • Summaries of EU legislation on culture

Once a year, two towns in Europe are selected to be designated as Europe’s cultural capitals, providing an additional boost to local economies while shining a spotlight on local artists and each city’s distinct cultural heritage. Throughout the year, the EU collaborates with film festivals, cultural exhibitions, concerts, conferences, artistic prizes, and awards that take place all around Europe.

  • Discover the cultural events sponsored by the EU in your country
  • Learn about Europe’s history and culture through interactive maps that include links to more than 50 million items of art.

What is ‘European culture’?

Is there a common culture among the people of Europe? We occasionally inquire as to what it means to be “European,” and those of our readers who do identify as having a European identity (which is by no means all of you) frequently mention shared values, history, and culture as reasons for their identification. Yes, Beethoven and Da Vinci are well-known as historical figures, but are they truly European in origin? Isn’t it true that great artists are part of a shared global culture, that they are part of humanity’s collective heritage?

  • True, we all enjoy Italian food, but we also eat Indian and Chinese food on a regular basis.
  • Alternatively, has culture become more global in the twenty-first century?
  • At various points throughout history, European identity was frequently tied with religious identity.
  • Catholicism served as a justification for early proposals for common European political unity (such as those advanced by the 15th-century Bohemian King George of Podbrady), and this was a common theme throughout history.
  • The Protestant Reformation added yet another layer of complexity to the picture, making it impossible to describe the continent as a single united Christendom.
  • The cultures and beliefs of today’s Europe are considerably more varied than they were in the past.
  • There doesn’t seem to be a common thread running across all of that.

Is there anything that unites us as a society on a cultural level? Or, in the twenty-first century, is culture a worldwide phenomenon? Please provide us with your ideas and opinions in the form below. We will forward them to politicians and professionals to receive their feedback.

IMAGE CREDITS: CC / Flickr –Kristina Savic

The European Commission Delegation in Washington, DC is providing funding for this initiative, which will take place over the calendar year 2009. It was conceptualized and developed by the Institute for Human Sciences at Boston University, and it is managed by the institute in collaboration with the Boston University Center for International Relations. In addition to the literary journal AGNI, the Boston Globe, WBUR (New England’s largest public radio station), Zephyr Press, the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA), and the consulates and honorary consulates of the European Union member-states in Boston, we worked with a number of other organizations.

  1. Our major focus is on the arts, which serve as the basis for a thriving cultural landscape in which residents’ conceptions of themselves are developed.
  2. Following that, we will look more explicitly at Europe’s political culture(s), the differences in traditions of political practice across member-states, and the differences in conceptions of political legitimacy among the general public.
  3. Every culture has deeply ingrained traditions surrounding food, and the future of food is increasingly in doubt on both sides of the Atlantic as a result of changed farming techniques.
  4. The project is broken down into three sections.

The lectures and accompanying interviews will be held on “The Future of Food” on “Europe Day,” and the lectures will be held on “The Political Culture(s) of the EU.” Our objective is to demonstrate the cultural variety that serves as the creative engine that powers the European Union, as well as to extend across the Atlantic the intercultural discussion that is a daily occurrence in many parts of the European Union.

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A window of opportunity has opened up for the transatlantic relationship with the change in the US administration; our project takes advantage of this opportunity to engage ordinary citizens on both sides of the Atlantic in a discussion of European Union policies and institutions through the vital medium of culture, which we define broadly as the storehouse of knowledge and experience in a political community.

A predecessor project, entitled “Getting to Know the European Union: Member States in Focus,” was completed by the institute in 2008, and this project builds on that work by furthering its goals, which include increased knowledge of Europe among Americans and the exchange of ideas across the Atlantic.

We examine the forces of creativity and innovation at work, which are altering the political culture of Europe (s).

It also serves as a vehicle for the transmission of ideals, and as Commissioner Benita Ferrero-Waldner has stated, “Europe’s soft power is founded on the gravitational pull of its guiding principles.” Ultimately, we want to involve local communities and enhance their understanding of European Union policies and institutions on a local level.

In fact, our “Poetry and Politics” series (a series of dialogues with European and American poets held between 2004 and 2007) has proven to be our most popular series to date, garnering over 2,000 participants.

This approach encourages our public to think in new and creative ways about the role culture can play in international affairs.

For the first time in over four years, Jose Manuel Barroso declared that “the European Union has reached a moment in its history when its cultural dimension cannot be disregarded.” We examine the conditions that allow for the peaceful coexistence of different cultures within the European Union, as well as some of the challenges that Europe’s growing diversity has posed, such as disparities in economic development, social stratification, intercultural and interreligious conflict, xenophobia, and a resurgence of nationalistic sentiment.

Migration and immigration on the European continent have, without a doubt, caused difficulties, but the expansion of the European cultural space has been a beneficial development in the broader scheme of things.

When compared to a nation state, the European Union fosters better liberty, greater security, and a larger market than is conceivable within that state.

It is clear, however, that centralization and bureaucratization are not the solutions to the problems.

The success of the European Union in energizing and stabilizing democracy at home and abroad, while not imposing a monolithic European culture or European identity on its members, is owed in great part to the fact that it is composed of people from a variety of cultural backgrounds and backgrounds.

  • Simple solutions are unattainable when there are so many competing interests to accommodate.
  • Increasingly, our lives are being impacted by greater forces that have an impact on many parts of our existence, from the food we consume to the items we purchase.
  • Our study investigates this multilayer collaboration and is itself an endeavor to engage local US individuals in a transatlantic discussion on issues of critical relevance to the world community at large.
  • In this project, we investigate how the European Union is itself growing into a new organizational paradigm—a network of cultures that are unified in their diversity—and what this means for the future of the European Union.
  • We are still worried about what being a member of the European Union means for the average person on the street—especially because the success of the European project will be determined by its capacity to inspire individuals in their own communities.
  • Cultures are not simply national, but also regional, ethnic, and, increasingly, transnational and global in their scope and manifestation.
  • As stated in the project’s underlying concept, Europe’s cultural variety, reflected by its varied traditions, literatures, and ways of life, is what makes the continent so rich and diverse.

The European Union, as a political body, is a creative force in today’s globe, which, although it might make for cumbersome politics at times, is also a source of unpredictability.

Europe culture

A grant from the European Commission Delegation in Washington, DC, will support this initiative, which will take place over the calendar year 2009. It was conceptualized and developed by the Institute for Human Sciences at Boston University, and it is administered by the institute in collaboration with the Center for International Relations at Boston University, among other institutions. In addition to the literary journal AGNI, the Boston Globe, WBUR (New England’s largest public radio station), Zephyr Press, the American Literary Translators’ Association (ALTA), and the consulates and honorary consulates of European Union member-states in Boston, we worked with a number of other organizations.

  • In particular, we are interested in the arts, which serve as the foundation for the thriving cultural landscape that allows residents to construct their own self-perceptions.
  • Following that, we will look more explicitly at Europe’s political culture(s), the differences in traditions of political practice across member-states, and the differences in conceptions of political legitimacy among citizens throughout the continent.
  • Despite the fact that every culture has deeply ingrained culinary traditions, the future of food is increasingly in doubt on both sides of the Atlantic as a result of changed agricultural techniques.
  • A total of three pieces make up the project.
  • Our objective is to demonstrate the cultural variety that serves as the creative engine that powers the European Union, as well as to extend across the Atlantic the intercultural discussion that is a daily occurrence in many parts of the European continent.

A predecessor project, entitled “Getting to Know the European Union: Member States in Focus,” was completed by the institute in 2008, and this project builds on that work by advancing its goals, which include increased knowledge of Europe among Americans and the exchange of ideas across the Atlantic.

On this page, we will examine the forces of creativity and innovation at work, which are altering the political culture of Europe (s).

Additionally, it serves as a vehicle for the transmission of values, and as European Commissioner Benita Ferrero-Waldner has stated, “Europe’s soft power is founded on the gravitational pull of its guiding ideals.” A major objective of ours is to involve community members and to create knowledge of European Union policies and institutions in the local community.

  1. We have discovered a different, more appealing way of approaching US-European relations as a result of our investigations into the complex relationships between language, politics, and culture.
  2. As a cultural institution, the European Union is examined in this study, which also focuses on the creative forces at work in Europe today in three fields.
  3. – Without a doubt, the effects of migration and immigration on the European continent have been difficult to deal with, but the expansion of the European cultural space has been a generally constructive development.
  4. When compared to the nation-state, the European Union delivers greater liberty, greater security, and a larger market than is conceivable.
  5. It is clear, however, that centralization and bureaucratization are not the solutions to our problems.

The success of the European Union in galvanizing and stabilizing democracy at home and abroad, without imposing a monolithic European culture or European identity on its members, is due in large part to the fact that it is composed of people from a variety of cultural backgrounds and ethnic backgrounds.

  • Europe’s cultural variety is a source of inspiration.
  • Increasingly, our lives are being affected by greater forces that have an impact on many parts of our existence, from the food we consume to the items we purchase.
  • Our study investigates this multilayer collaboration and is itself an endeavor to engage local US individuals in a transatlantic discussion on issues of critical concern to the world community.
  • In this project, we investigate how the European Union is itself growing into a new organizational paradigm—a network of cultures that are unified in their diversity—and what this means for the future of the organization.
  • In particular, we are worried about what participation in the European Union means for the average person on the street, especially because the success of the European project will be determined by its capacity to inspire ordinary people around the world.
  • Cultures are not merely national, but also regional, ethnic, and, increasingly, transnational and global in their scope and application.

Despite the fact that it may make for unmanageable politics at times, it is also one of the factors that contribute to the European Union’s status as an innovative power in today’s globe.

Faultlines

One of the most difficult questions to answer when attempting to define European culture is where does Europe begin and where does it finish. The majority of countries have shared historical experiences, however there are many significant faultlines to be aware of. As previously stated, the first division is made up of land that was at some point under the control of the Roman Empire, which divides Europe along a line that runs through Hadrian’s Wall in the British Isles, along the Rhine, and finally along the Danube River.

  1. Another faultline is the one that divides the lands that were once occupied by the Ottoman Empire from those that were not, which resulted in the current Christian-Islam faultline that divides Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Turkey, among other places.
  2. Finally, the famed Iron Curtain is the most recent faultline to have appeared.
  3. They are also critical in determining whether nations should be accepted into the European Union.
  4. It follows that the issue of “common culture” or “common values” is far less straightforward than it appears.

Values

Defining European culture is fraught with difficulties, not least of which is figuring out where the continent begins and ends. Despite the fact that most countries have shared historical experiences, a number of significant faultlines are visible. As previously stated, the first division is made up of area that was at some point under the control of the Roman Empire, which divides Europe along a line that runs via Hadrian’s Wall in the British Isles, down the Rhine, and lastly along the Danube river.

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The present Christian-Islam faultline, which divides Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Turkey, was generated by the faultline that divides the countries that were formerly occupied by the Ottoman Empire from those that were not.

After it comes the iconic Iron Curtain, which was built in the 1950s and 1960s.

They are also critical in determining whether nations should be accepted into the European Union (such as in the case of Turkey or the 2004 separatist menace in Ukraine). As a result, the issue of “shared culture” or “common values” is significantly more complicated than it appears.

Arts

See European art history for further information.

Food and drink

See European cuisine for further information.

Language

See European languages for further information. Language is an extremely essential component of culture, and Europe is home to a diverse range of languages, with the majority of nations having at least one official language in use. Russian is the most widely spoken language in Europe, and it is followed by German. A large number of regional languages are also spoken, with some of them having some sort of official recognition or significance. Other minority languages are also spoken in addition to English.

The European Union alone has 20 official languages, all of which are accorded the same legal status as English.

Sport

Football is the most popular spectator sport in Europe, but there are a variety of other sports that have more localized followings, includingrugby union and rugby league, cricket, gaelic games, pelota and petanque, and ice hockey. European Championships are held in a number of sports.

  • European Rugby Championships
  • Sport in the European Union
  • Mitropa Cup
  • UEFA
  • Rugby League European Nations Cup
  • FIRA – Association of European Rugby
  • European SC Championships

Symbols

  • Category:European culture
  • European Capital of Culture
  • European Year of Culture

The Physical and Cultural Landscape of Europe

1. Activate pupils’ preexisting knowledge of Europe by asking them questions about it. If you have traveled to Europe, you may choose to share some of your personal experiences, maps, or photographs with the group. Inviting volunteers to share their own personal experiences with Europe is a great way to start. And then we’ll talk about what you already know about Europe, whether it’s from previous classes, maps, books, television, or movies. 2. Ask pupils to come up with their own opinions about Europe.

  • Students should be divided into pairs.
  • Encourage them to make use of the phrases written on the board to assist them in coming up with ideas.
  • Assemble the lists, either by asking students to share their thoughts or by having students write their ideas on the whiteboard in front of the class.
  • Explain to them that you are just interested in getting a sense of what they already know and what they would like to learn about Europe.

3. Create a borderless map of Europe with physical and cultural aspects drawn on it. Provide each student couple with a copy of the map Europe Without Borders, which should be displayed on the wall. Make a list of the following items and write it on the board:

  • The compass rose, the boundary between Europe and Asia, and other symbols. the prime meridian (0o longitude), which runs through England
  • Oceans
  • The borders of countries in Europe
  • Country names
  • Rivers, mountains, and other physical features
  • Areas where different languages are spoken and where particular religions are found
  • The prime meridian (0o longitude), which runs through England
  • The prime meridian (0o longitude), which runs nation borders in Europe throughout history as well as how they have altered

To complete this task, have students collaborate with their partners to sketch and identify as much as they can from two lists: the brainstorming list you developed as a class in Step 2 and the list you posted on the board. Encourage children to consider and make notes on why they drew things in the places that they did while they are working. While students are working, rotate around the room and use the following suggestions to better understand what they are thinking: Do you have a theory as to why that country (or physical or cultural feature) is in that particular location?

  • What level of confidence do you have in your drawing?
  • Divide the class into small groups and have them discuss their maps, thoughts, and questions.
  • Students should be asked to share their maps within their groups, as well as to debate their thoughts and make a list of any questions they have regarding Europe.
  • Hold a conversation with the entire class.
  • After that, everyone gathers for a debate on how tough it was to sketch the various elements of Europe.
  • What exactly did you have difficulty with?
  • Encourage students to make a list on a separate piece of paper and to continue to add to this list during the unit so that they may discover the answers before the subject is completed.

Informal Assessment

Request that students express their grasp of Europe’s political, cultural, geographical, and historical landscapes during the group discussions in Step 4. Examine the maps created by pupils to see whether or not they have learned anything. Clarify any information that is unclear.

Learning Objectives

Request that students express their grasp of Europe’s political, cultural, geographical, and historical landscapes during the group discussions that occur in Step 4. Determine whether or not pupils have learned from their maps. Make any necessary clarifications to the given information.

  • Their past knowledge and beliefs about Europe are shown on a map. Prepare questions about Europe in the form of a list.

Teaching Approach

  • Brainstorming, cooperative learning, discussions, hands-on learning, and visual training are some of the techniques used.

Connections to National Standards, Principles, and Practices

  • Common Core Standard 1: How to interpret and share information via the use of maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technology, and spatial thinking
  • Standard 2: How to arrange knowledge about people, places, and surroundings in a spatial context by using mental maps
  • Norm 4: The physical and human qualities of a location

ISTE Standards for Students (ISTE Standards*S)

  • Internet access is optional
  • Technological setup includes one computer per classroom and a projector.

Physical Space

Examine the students’ lists from Step 2 to gain a sense of what they already know about Europe and what they would like to learn. You may use this information to help shape the lessons that will be taught in the following weeks.

Background Information

Europe is often divided from Asia by the Ural Mountains, and from Africa by the Mediterranean Sea, which serves as a natural boundary. It may be found throughout the northern hemisphere, as well as the eastern and western hemispheres of the world. Europa stretches from the subarctic to the Mediterranean regions, with latitudes ranging from roughly 75o north to 35o north. Europe’s latitudinal reach is greater than that of the United States, which is farther north. Because of Europe’s latitudinal position, it is exposed to the cyclical changes of global pressure belts and wind systems, resulting in a variable and unpredictable climate.

  • The convergence of maritime channels on the European continent facilitated the interchange of ideas and commodities.
  • There are no places that are more than 483 kilometers (300 miles) from the sea.
  • Europe is a very tiny continent, with a total land area of around 6,437,376 kilometers (4,000,000 square miles).
  • Language and religion are two of the most important cultural components that influence national and cultural identity in Europe.

Europeans are primarily fluent in a variety of Indo-European languages, which include: Hellenic (Greek); Romance (Latin-based languages of the Mediterranean and Romanian); Celtic (mostly extinct, but including Gaelic, Welsh, and Breton); Germanic (Scandinavian languages as well as modern German, Dutch, and English); Balto-Slavonic; and Illyrian-Thracian (Albanian).

  • These languages are members of their own language families, which include the Uralic family (Finn-Ugric), the Semitic family (Arabic and Hebrew), the Altaic family (Turkish), and the Basque family (unknown origin).
  • Despite the fact that Europe is largely Christian, a few of Balkan countries have a majority, plurality, or sizable minority of their population that is linked with Islam.
  • Albania, Kosovo, Bosnia & Herzegovina, and Macedonia are among the countries on this list.
  • Before and during World War II, the majority of Europe’s Jewish people were either exterminated or forced to evacuate their homes.

Following the two world wars, Christianity in Europe has seen a significant decline in popularity. Despite the fact that religion remains a significant cultural component, the number of individuals who practice and are affiliated with churches continues to diminish at an alarming rate.

Recommended Prior Activities

Line dividing two parcels of land, whether natural or manmade. climate Weather conditions for a certain area over a length of time are referred to as nounall weather conditions. compass rose compass rose compass rose The cardinal directions are represented by a nounsymbol (N, S, E, W). Nounone of the seven major land masses that make up the Earth’s surface. country Noungeographic area with a separate name, flag, population, boundaries, and government from anywhere else on the planet. The cultural landscape is a noun that refers to the human imprint on the physical environment.

  • The geographical characteristics of an area are denoted by the noun.
  • The nounposition of a certain point on the Earth’s surface is defined as follows: In degrees, the distance between two points east or west of the prime meridian is measured.
  • The ocean is a vast mass of salt water that covers the majority of the planet.
  • Nounimaginary line around the Earth that runs north-south and has a longitude of 0 degrees.
  • Nouna huge stream of pure water that is always running.
  • European National Geographic Education: Resources
  • European National Geographic Education: Physical Geography
  • European National Geographic Education: Human Geography
  • National Geographic Education: Europe—Resources
  • The continent of Europe is represented by NG MapMaker Interactive. Europe 1-Page Map created with NG MapMaker
  • Europe MapMaker Kit is a collection of tools for creating maps of Europe.
  • Teacher Leadership Academy (NTLA) in Geographic Education
  • National Geographic Education

TipsModifications

To assess whether or not students already have a sufficient understanding of Europe, break them into groups of four and ask each group to create an entirely new map based on only one of the following: political borders; cultural groupings; physical geography; or historical development. Afterwards, have each student present his or her map to their small group, allowing the other students in the group an opportunity to remark on or add to the map. The group should next create a list of questions they have about Europe as well as a list of items they are already familiar with about Europe.

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Modification

If students are having difficulty with this activity because they have little or no background knowledge of Europe, have them consult the encyclopedic entries listed in the “For Further Exploration” section of this activity and/or atlases to provide them with additional background information about the continent.

Media Credits

With the exception of promotional graphics, which normally link to another page that carries the media credit, all audio, artwork, photos, and videos are attributed beneath the media asset they are associated with. In the case of media, the Rights Holder is the individual or group that gets credited.

Writer

Shelley Sperry is the editor of Sperry Editorial.

Editors

Kim Hulse is a National Geographic Society photographer.

National Geographic Society’s Christina Riska Simmons explains how the organization works. Emmy Scammahorn is a member of the National Geographic Society. Kathleen Schwille is a National Geographic Society researcher and writer. Emily Wade has a B.A. in Philosophy and a B.A. in English.

Educator Reviewers

The College of William and Mary’s Brian Blouet Mary Olwyn Blouet is a professor at Virginia State University. Michal LeVasseur, Ph.D., is the liaison for the National Geographic Alliance Network. Audrey Mohan was a student in 2007-2008. The Grosvenor Scholars Program of the National Geographic Society Ian Muehlenhaus is a professor at the University of Minnesota. Distinguished Professor of Geography and Rippey Chair in Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Oregon Department of Geography, Alexander Murphy Professor Peter Rees of the University of Delaware Joseph Stoltman is a professor at Western Michigan University.

Expert Reviewer

Marge A. Legates is the Coordinator for the Delaware Geographic Alliance.

National Geographic Program

Beyond Borders: The Summer Geography Institute of 2008.

Other

  • The educators who participated in National Geographic’s 2008-2009 National Teacher Leadership Academy (NTLA) for testing activities in their classrooms and providing feedback on the content for all of the Beyond Borders: Using Maps to Understand European Physical and Cultural Landscapes resources deserve a special thank you. Permissions Granted to Users Users’ permissions are detailed in our Terms of Service, which you can see by clicking here. Alternatively, if you have any issues regarding how to reference something from our website in your project or classroom presentation, please speak with your instructor. They will be the most knowledgeable about the selected format. When you contact them, you will need to provide them with the page title, URL, and the date on which you visited the item.

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Interactives

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The culture that connects Europe

Are there any shared European traditions when it comes to celebrating, dressing, or even seeing into the future? Whether it’s Oktoberfest or stilettos, there’s a common method to peek into the future. What common interests, traditions, or religious beliefs do they have? Throughout its history, Google ArtsCulture has been dedicated to making culture from all around the world available to people all over the globe. Over the last seven years, we’ve collaborated with hundreds of European cultural organizations to digitize their collections and make them available online.

  1. In this year-long project by the European Commission, the European history is highlighted, and cultures from all around the continent are celebrated.
  2. To quote the European Commission’s Director-General for Education, Youth and Sport, on the exhibit: “The European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018 is a celebration that has already grabbed the imagination of more than 3.6 million people in 36 countries,” says Tibor Navracsics.
  3. Its goal is to inspire more people to gather together in order to discover and appreciate Europe’s rich cultural legacy, which is currently underexplored.
  4. As a result, younger generations are the custodians of this remarkable and priceless asset, and their future is entrusted to them as the keepers of our common history.
  5. Unexpected anecdotes of street art festivals, fortune-telling, and gastronomy are revealed in these exhibitions about art history.
  6. In addition to being a visual experience, the exhibit offers a tactile one.
  7. In contrast to the customary “beep” of public transportation, Jonna Jinton from Sweden delivered a hypnotic traditional herding call, which was accompanied by a traditional herding cry.
  8. A single audio piece was created from this collection of sounds, which we believe captures the essence of Europe.

We are really pleased of this accomplishment. For the European Year of Cultural Heritage, visit g.co/europeforculture to find out how you can make new connections.

The culture that connects us

What makes a country genuinely stand out in today’s globe, when there are so many diverse cultures to choose from? The Good Country Index has compiled a rating of 125 nations that make significant cultural contributions on a worldwide scale, based on statistical measurements of a variety of characteristics such as creative exports and the economic effect of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. We take a look at the top ten countries in Europe and consider what makes them deserving of their high ranking.

It is Austria’s towns and architecture that have played a significant part in shaping its cultural character, with the historic sites of Salzburg and Vienna both being designated as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

A number of structures, such as the cathedral of St.

WikiCommons|Marie-Carnival Claire’s of Binche, France Some of Belgium’s greatest cultural achievements have been exported successfully, particularly in the field of cartoons and comics, where it has long been regarded as a world leader in this sector.

The Musée Hergé, which opened in Louvain-la-Neuve in 2009 and attracts visitors from all over the world, is a must-see.

The Carnival of Binchetakes takes place every year in the days leading up to Ash Wednesday, during which hundreds of participants dress up in wax masks and costumes and parade through the streets in an attempt to fend off evil luck.

The city is renowned for its stunning architecture, thriving cultural scene, and delectable cuisine, among other things.

Its substantial, meat-based meals, hearty soups, and great craft brews have done much to improve the image of Eastern European cuisine in recent years, and this is reflected in the variety of fine-dining restaurants and chicbars that have opened in the region.

Karen Sndergaard |

A rich collection of paintings by Danish and foreign artists, including masterpieces from the Danish Golden Age like Carl Bloch and Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg, may be found at the city’s museums, notably the Statens Museum för Kunst.

Festival of Viljandi Traditional Music / WikiCommons|Danrok With its historic capital city as its centerpiece, Estonia boasts breathtaking architecture as well as an array of intriguing and enticing restaurants that serve the finest of Nordic and East European cuisine.

In addition to modern classical composers like as Arvo Pärt and Neeme Järvi, the nation has also produced the more unique folk-metal band Metsastöll.

This all culminates every five years at the Song Festival, which brings together tens of thousands of Estonians to sing in unison.

• WikiCommons|LH DD LH DD LH DD Wifö Germany, like Belgium, derives a significant portion of its cultural identity from its customs and festivals.

The Weihnachtsmarkt, often known as the Christmas market, is perhaps the most well-known of all of Germany’s traditions.

One thing they all have in common is a strong emphasis on German culture — the aromas of typical German foods such as bratwurst and gingerbread fill the air, and each market provides a unique range of German crafts and handcrafted items.

St Patrick’s Day celebrations have spread throughout the world and are centered on honoring Irish heritage and culture.

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Furthermore, Ireland’s natural beauty is just as essential to its cultural history as its artistic achievements, with tourist destinations such as theRing of Kerry and theAran Islands bringing in millions of people each year and becoming iconic features of the Irish landscape and culture.

Luxembourg’s culture may be found in great part in its three national languages – French, German, and Luxembourgish – as well as in its literature.

Beautiful Luxembourg City is perched on high plateaus, with bridges across dizzying canyons, and the city provides a number of guided walking excursions to take in the breathtaking views.

Outside of the city, a vast number of castles bear witness to both the French and German influences that have shaped the nation.

Denis Barthel’s photograph of the inside of St John’s Co-Cathedral is available on WikiCommons.

Because the island has been controlled successively by the Phoenicians, Greeks, Arabs, and the Order of the Knights of St John, Maltese culture is indicative of the enormous number of various cultures that have come into touch with the island during its historical development.

The magnificentSt John’s Co-Cathedral, a superb example of Baroque architecture and widely regarded as one of Europe’s most beautiful cathedrals, is housed in a Rococo palace, while the National Museum of Fine Arts is situated in a Neoclassical edifice.

|John Lewis Marshall |Rijksmuseum / Photo courtesy of the Rijksmuseum|

A strong historical arts sector exists in the Netherlands, which is home to some of the world’s finest artists and their works, as well as some of their most important works.

A number of smaller museums further celebrate Dutch art and culture by making it accessible to the general public – the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, for example, displays the eponymous artist’s famous ‘Sunflowers’ (1889), while the Royal Delft factory offers tours and workshops to give visitors an insight into the manufacturing process behind the iconic Delft ceramics.

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