What Is Surface Culture

Contents

Surface Culture: The Visible Gateway to Deep Culture

Because it encourages students to develop self-confidence and pride in their own skin while also making meaningful connections with their peers, I believe that surface culture should be represented in the curriculum and school environment on a continual basis in the curriculum and school environment. Consider the following scenario: We were wandering nervously through new halls, trying to read foreign environmental lettering at every corner of each monochrome wall, which we couldn’t quite make out.

Knowing that you are surrounded by familiar laughing as your classmates play and speak with one another, but being unable to communicate with them because you do not understand their language and they do not understand yours.

The experience is similar to that of speaking within a soundproof booth, hammering against the glass in an attempt to get your message and feelings over to the listener.

You’ve traveled hundreds of miles away from your native country to find yourself in this situation.

  1. Fidgeting nervous system, starting at the apex of your heart and settling at the base of your stomach There is a scorching feeling of sadness that settles there.
  2. Where the tiny comforts of home bring you to a state of perfect inner serenity.
  3. This image depicts an emotionally charged, but realistic scene of a newcomer’s first day at school, which is depicted in vivid detail.
  4. We can use empathy to soften similar situations like this by learning more about your students’ lives outside of their academic achievements and shortcomings.
  5. Learning about their cultural identity first will lead to the discovery of individualized approaches that will aid them in achieving academic success in the future.
  6. Zaretta Hammond’s book, Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain, explains that culture operates on three different levels: the surface level, the intermediate or shallow level, and the deepest level.
  7. What does this unambiguous definition of Surface Culture mean to you, as someone who has never heard of it before?

In a school setting, how can we recognize and respect the surface culture of all of our students?

Hammond’s Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain includes a chapter on this topic.

I believe that surface culture should be represented in the curriculum and school environment on a regular basis, based on my experience as an English language specialist for emerging bilinguals/multilinguals of both children and adults.

The first thing we did in the mornings with my students was sit in a circle, make respectful gestures such as eye contact, and naturally exchange parts of our surface culture because they were representative of our daily lives.

As a further means of encouraging these themes, I would formulate authentic questions to elicit discussions on how surface culture shapes their everyday lives.

Their stories were sometimes told through drawings, images, photographs, or videos, depending on the situation.

We were brought together by our commonalities, and we gained insight from our differences.

We have to be ourselves and let go of our inhibitions.

As the year progressed, these discussions became a regular part of our daily routine.

Our connections grew naturally as a result of these dialogues, which helped us develop skills such as identifying identities, enhancing student voice, and creating empathy for one another.

RootedInStrengthCAEducationNeverDies Surface culture should not be portrayed as shallow, but rather as significant in its own right.

Our family’s history and ethnic roots are tethered together by heartfelt recollections and sensitive emotions.

In order for our world to function properly, these key abilities must be taught to children from an early age and reinforced as they get older.

Edward T.

Hall’s Cultural Iceberg Model 2010).

The Cultural Iceberg, created by Edward T.

What strategies can we use to meet the requirements of kids from a variety of ethnic backgrounds?

We can gather this knowledge over time by engaging in intentional dialogues, collecting data via multilingual surveys, collaborating with family and community members, and doing research.

Incorporate surface culture into your school curriculum and surroundings with the help of the suggestions provided below:

  • Request that members of your family or community give a presentation on aspects of their culture that are important to them. Various forms of folkloric literature, dance, music, and art will be demonstrated and discussed. Important historical individuals and events are presented and explored in detail. Celebrate and recognize events, festivals, and holidays throughout the year on the dates on which they take place
  • Create an indigenous foods garden on your school’s grounds so that kids may learn how to cook them and discuss the foods’ cultural significance. Honor cultural pastimes and acquire their particular methods (basket weaving, pottery making, and so on). Exhibit a diverse collection of flags, textiles, and artwork from the nations represented at your institution
  • And Display environmental print in several languages as well as universal symbols to assist with directions, instructions, and terminology

Carolyne Chengo, Jimmie Chengo’s mother, is dressed in traditional Luo tribal attire during a tribal celebration in Kenya. Jimmie Chengo, a Kenyan college student and the founder of the Afribuk Society Initiative, was born in Nairobi. Children, reading, and tales are some of my favorite things. Although surface culture constitutes just ten percent of Edward T. Hall’s cultural iceberg, it is the portion of the iceberg that is visible and accessible to the general public. With the help of our five senses, we as humans make sense of our surroundings and establish connections with one another.

  • Whenever culture is associated with these senses, they become an integral part of our soul, heart, and essence.
  • Unless we recognize the essential characteristics of surface culture, we will be unable to get to the depths of profound, internal cultural traditions.
  • Without the other, one cannot exist or be significant in any way.
  • What do they imply to you personally?
  • That’s exactly what I hope it will accomplish for you.
  • Montana’s Nick Salmon is the Founder and President of Collaborative Learning Network, as well as a Global PBL Coach and the Furniture Whisperer Edward T.
  • (2010).
  • (2015).
  • Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, California.

Surface Culture vs. Deep Culture

Hello, there, world! I was recently asked a series of questions at one of my certification classes, and the following is my response. To put it another way, surface culture is simply the cultural standards that may be easily recognized in a foreign place. When it comes to deep culture, the cultural norms are not immediately discernible unless you are born and raised in that specific culture or until you spend a lengthy period of time in that particular foreign culture. An extract of what I just experienced in Argentina and Ecuador is included here for your convenience.

  • In addition to kissing relatives and close “Latino” friends on the cheek as a welcome, eating tamales around Christmas, and smashing eggs shells on family members’ heads during Easter are some of the “surface cultural” aspects of my Mexican-American heritage.
  • People in “mainstream” America shake hands with strangers and embrace them with close friends if they don’t know them well.
  • Although I do this with my family and close “Latino” friends, I would never do it with the students who study in my classroom.
  • Eventually, I made certain that I was prepared before they arrived and that I would “find time” to kiss them as a greeting when they arrived.
  • For example, being a part of a close-knit group of people When it comes to “anyone” that any member of the family invites into our house, we are a very warm and inviting Mexican family (whether its my home, my grandmas, or my uncles).
  • The fact that we speak what we mean and mean what we say, as well as being relatively timely, is another unsaid characteristic of American society.
  • with his cousin and his wife.

I believe that adjusting to “deep culture” is more difficult.

As stated in the description of “deep culture,” these are traditions that we’ve been raised with, making it practically impossible to be aware of them on our own.

Initially, it was driving me insane!

Eventually, I adopted the same approach that the natives did.

I really wanted to explain to them how a line works and how fair it would be, but I couldn’t bring myself to say it out loud except to my husband, who was listening in on the conversation.

However, I believe there is a time and a place for sharing such judgments with the purpose of better understanding a foreign culture.

I received the impression that students and the individuals at the organization where we were working placed a higher importance on the teaching profession and what we had to give than those in the United States of America.

As previously said, one of the most difficult obstacles for me, albeit a minor one in retrospect, was scheduling time to kiss each kid before and after class on a daily basis.

Overview of Culturally Responsive Practices : Introduction

Consider the following considerations before getting into the important task of Equitable Instruction and Culturally Responsive Practices: 1. Establishing some core understandings, and/or expanding on your present understandings. This area has been established specifically for this purpose. Specifically, implicit biases, growth mindset, and universal design for learning are three frameworks that are vitally relevant when it comes to this research. When it comes to understanding how culture influences how we interact with the world around us, the Culture Treeis an excellent visual tool to use.

Consider yourself to be a coach of a sports team for the sake of argument.

Is it probable that you would use this information to construct your practice time and assistance of individual players in order to ensure that the team achieves the greatest amount of success possible after receiving this information?

Equitable Instruction and Culturally Responsive Practices are no exception to this general rule.

Levels Of Culture For Culturally Relevant Teaching

Understanding a student’s culture is essential to providing culturally appropriate instruction. Several studies have demonstrated that it is an essential component of the learning process. It is, in my opinion, the most important element of the essay. How to cope with achievement discrepancies is a topic that we have endless talks about. Achievement discrepancies are exacerbated by the “cultural gap” that exists between pupils and their professors. Nonetheless, we have relatively few dialogues about it.

  1. In many cases, these dialogues are prevented from occurring because to adult comments such as “I just can’t seem to distinguish between colors.” That is a problem in and of itself.
  2. Consider this: Are you Color Blind or Color Brave?
  3. A gold star with the words “I’m not a racist since I’m colorblind” written on it.
  4. For the “achievement gap” to be closed, it is necessary to take action to close the “cultural gap.” Culturization is the process through which we make sense of the world around us.
  5. We want pupils to be able to make sense of mathematics.
  6. Teaching Materials that are Culturally Responsive Make it a point, as an instructor, to be familiar with the three levels of cultural understanding.
  7. Surface culture, shallow culture, and deep culture are the three layers of culture.
  8. This has the least amount of influence in your classrooms since it has a little emotional impact on the trust of the students.

Do any of these ideas seem like something you might integrate into your lessons? Sure. A county flag might be used as a teaching tool for fractions. The ability to transform regular encounters into important events is just not as beneficial for pupils.

2. Shallow Culture

Understanding a pupil’s cultural background is essential to providing culturally appropriate instruction to that student. According to research, it is an important component of the learning process. It is, in my opinion, the most important aspect of the equation. How to cope with achievement discrepancies is a topic that we discuss endlessly. Achievement disparities are exacerbated by a “cultural gap” that exists between pupils and their professors. However, there are very few discussions about it.

  1. Many of these dialogues are prevented from taking place because adults make remarks such as “Well, I don’t perceive color.” Simply said, this is a problem.
  2. Please seeColor Blind or Color Brave?
  3. I gave a Ted Talk on this subject.
  4. A gold star with the words “I’m not a racist since I’m colorblind” written over the top.
  5. For the “achievement gap” to be closed, it is necessary to take action to close the “cultural gap”.
  6. The inclusion of this concept in our curriculum is therefore vital.
  7. In order to transform ordinary experiences into significant ones, the brain makes use of cultural knowledge.
  8. Teaching Materials that are Culturally Responsive.
  9. Consider how you are now utilizing it and what improvements you could make to your approach to it.
  10. Such is the food, clothing, music, holidays, and other aspects of a person’s or community’s lifestyle.

Do any of these ideas seem like something you might implement into your classes? Sure. As a fraction lesson, a county flag might be utilized as a prop. The ability to transform ordinary occurrences into memorable ones is just not as beneficial for kids. –

3. Deep Culture

Understanding the culture of a learner is essential to providing culturally appropriate instruction. According to research, it is an essential component of the learning process. It is, in my opinion, the most important aspect. How to close the accomplishment gap is a topic that we discuss endlessly. Achievement discrepancies are exacerbated when there is a “cultural gap” between pupils and their teachers. However, we have relatively few discussions about it. What is the cause of this? Because adults say things like “Well, I don’t perceive color,” many of these dialogues never take place.

  • You should be able to see color.
  • In a Ted Talk, he discusses.
  • A gold star with the words “I’m not racist since I’m colorblind” written on it.
  • In order to close the “achievement gap,” we must first close the “cultural divide.” Culture is the method in which we make sense of the world.
  • We want pupils to be able to comprehend mathematics.
  • Teaching Materials That Are Culturally Responsive Make it a point, as an instructor, to be familiar with the three levels of culture.
  • Culture may be classified into three levels: surface culture, shallow culture, and deep culture.
  • This has the least amount of influence in your classrooms since it has a minimal emotional impact on the concept of trust.
  • Sure.
  • The ability to transform ordinary occurrences into memorable ones is just not as beneficial for kids.
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What is the difference between surface and deep culture?

When it comes to culture, what is the difference between surface and deep culture? Surface Culture is a term used to describe the way things seem on the surface of things. It is the physical conventions that are frequently identified with a certain culture that are referred to as surface culture. Deep culture, on the other hand, refers to those cultural standards that are not visible to the naked eye. 16th of September, 2019 What is meant by “deeper culture”? Culture is defined as the features and knowledge of a certain group of people, and it includes language, religion, food, social behaviors, music, and the arts, among other things.

What is the significance of understanding the distinction between surface and deep culture?

When it comes to deep culture, the cultural norms are not immediately discernible unless you are born and raised in that specific culture or until you spend a lengthy period of time in that particular foreign culture.

A few examples of deep culture include attitudes toward authority, ideals of marriage, the family dynamic, and views about time and personal space, to name a few examples.

These are discovered through researching a culture’s ideas and values, relationships and roles, attitudes and standards, and other aspects of its way of life.

What is the difference between surface and deep culture? – Related Questions

The distinction between surface culture and deep culture is as follows: Surface Culture is a term used to describe the appearance of something on the surface of a material. It is the physical conventions that are frequently identified with a certain culture that are referred to as surface culture. Those cultural standards that are not visible are referred to as deep culture. On the 16th of September, the year 2019 begins. In what ways does deeper culture differ from the superficial culture? In the broadest sense, culture refers to the qualities and knowledge of a specific group of people.

‘Culture’ comes from a French phrase that stems from the Latin word “colere,” which translates as “to tend to the ground and flourish,” “to cultivate and nurture,” or simply “to care for anything.” The distinction between surface and deep culture is critical for understanding why.

Deep culture refers to cultural norms that are difficult to identify unless you are born and raised in that particular culture or spend an extensive period of time in that particular culture.

Deep culture may manifest itself in a variety of ways, such as attitudes toward authority, views of marriage, family dynamics, and beliefs about time and personal space.

What are the 7 aspects of culture?

Customs and traditions are important (rules for a society: laws, dress, food, etc.) The Humanities and Literature (values taught through the arts: literature, dance, music, art, etc.) Economic systems (which refer to the manner in which people utilise resources) Three fundamental economic questions: what goods/services should be produced? how much should be produced?

Why is deep culture important?

Culture at its Core In terms of importance, this is the most essential type of culture since it has a significant emotional influence on trust. It has an impact on how we learn new knowledge. It is this type of culture that manipulates our everyday activities and assists us in making sense of our surroundings.

What are the stages of cultural shock?

Culture shock often progresses through four distinct stages: the honeymoon phase, frustration, adjustment, and acceptance. Individuals have varying levels of experience with these stages, and the influence and sequence of each stage varies significantly.

Are celebrations surface culture?

Foods and eating patterns/habits are included under the category of Surface Culture: Foods. Patriotic holidays, religious observances, personal rites and festivities are all celebrated.

Visual and performing arts, music, and theatre are all examples of arts. Myths, fables, stories, fairy tales, folk songs, proverbs, riddles, jokes, limericks, poetry, rhymes, and games from folklore are all included here. History

What parts of culture are below the surface?

This element of culture is hidden behind the surface of a society and contains some beliefs, as well as values and cognitive processes that serve as the foundation for conduct. Significant distinctions exist between the cultures of the conscious and unconscious minds.

What are the deep structural components of culture?

This element of culture is hidden behind the surface of a society and contains some ideas, as well as values and thinking processes that serve as the foundation for certain behaviors. Significant distinctions exist between the cultures of the conscious and the unconscious.

How do you define culture?

When it comes to culture, it may be described as the entire set of ways of life of a people that are passed down from one generation to the next, including arts, beliefs, and institutions. One definition of culture is that it is “the way of life for a whole civilization.” Thus, it encompasses standards of conduct, dress, language, religion, ritual, and artistic expression.

What is sub surface culture?

2-The sub-surface culture: These are the unspoken laws of social interaction that are based on behavior and are present in all cultures, but are probably not frequently considered. Teachers might use particular examples from English-speaking cultures and contrast them with characteristics from the students’ own cultures to help them understand their own cultures better.

What is surface culture in microbiology?

Surface culture is the term used to describe the bacterial and fungal analysis of swabs taken from superficial and nonsurgical locations in order to diagnose infection.

What is surface culture in psychology?

It is the process of examining swabs from superficial and nonsurgical areas for bacteria and fungi in order to determine the presence or absence of infection.

What are the 3 aspect of culture?

Symbols, language, norms, values, and artifacts are some of the most important components of culture. Language makes it possible to have efficient social interactions and has an impact on how individuals conceptualize concepts and things.

What are the 6 aspects of culture?

The six dimensions of culture – In the opinion of Sturt, there are six components of culture that individuals search for in a wonderful place to work: a sense of purpose; opportunities for advancement; success; appreciation; well-being; and strong leadership.

What are the levels of school culture?

Organizations culture, according to Schein, may be divided into three categories: ob servable behaviors, shared values, and organizational as summaries of reality.

What is the most important element in Culturally Responsive Teaching?

One of the most important components of culturally responsive teaching is the creation of fair classroom environments that are equally favorable to learning for all children. When it comes to integrating culturally responsive teaching, instructional practices are just as vital as – if not more important than – multicultural curriculum designs.

What does culture shock look like?

Not knowing what to do or feeling powerless. I’m feeling really exposed right now. Lack of enthusiasm to engage in activities that you used to like. Suffering with the sensation that you’ve lost your sense of self

How serious is culture shock?

Your concentration may be impaired, making it more difficult for you to concentrate on your course work as a result of this.

Others report that they become more angry or emotional, and that their emotions appear to be more volatile in general. All of these side effects have the potential to exacerbate your anxiety.

What are the elements of surface culture?

Foods, as well as eating behaviors and habits, are included. Holidays, patriotic observances, religious observances, personal rites and festivities are all included.

Why is it important to understand your culture in relation to your students culture?

Students obtain a more thorough knowledge of the subject matter when they are collaborating and learning with people from a range of backgrounds and cultures who are present in the classroom setting. It also teaches students how to contribute to a varied working environment by utilizing their own abilities and points of view to their advantage.

Why is culture compared to an onion?

Culture, on the other hand, can be “peeled” and its layers stripped away, much like an onion. The outermost layer of the “onion,” or the outermost layer of a foreign culture, is comprised of things that can be seen, heard, and touched: artifacts, goods, and ceremonial practices. These ideas are derived from the “onion’s” core, which represents the most fundamental values of each civilization.

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Which of the following is an example of how culture is dynamic?

Which of the following is an illustration of how culture is always changing and evolving? Tradition has it that knowing one’s family tree is something that is passed down from one generation to the next. All member states of the European Union are required to implement a smoking ban in restaurants. Over time, attitudes on the role of women in the home and the office have shifted and shifted again.

Task four

You will need to be connected to the internet (with audio) in order to see several short videos and conduct some research. As well as a pen and paper to document your thoughts, you will need a copy of the Cultural Iceberg/ Cultural Tree Worksheet to complete during the session (with your notes from Station 3 if you completed it). Here is a link to the worksheet.

Introduction:

First, we learn about a culture through the things that we can easily observe – surface culture, which includes things like music, art, dance, different types of food and clothing. things that we might observe as tourists, but which only provide a superficial impression of a community’s culture. Second, we learn about a culture through its people. In addition, reaching beneath the surface and developing a greater understanding of Deep Culture is another way to get to know a community. Deep Culture is defined as the ideas and beliefs, feelings and attitudes, and collective experiences and behavioural norms that shape – and are shaped by – a community’s collective experiences and behavioural norms, and which, in turn, influence (but do not necessarily dictate) the way in which people of a culture might behave.

  • These are discovered through researching a culture’s ideas and values, relationships and roles, attitudes and standards, and other aspects of its way of life.
  • Take a look at this little film: How Do We Gain a Better Understanding of Our Own Culture?
  • How do we get started?
  • Essentially, we must first comprehend our own cultural impacts before we can begin to grasp the cultural forces that drive their views, attitudes, and behaviors.

Only in this way can we seek for similarities and differences, as well as make adjustments for our own cultural prejudice. So, where should we begin?

Watch and Learn:

Watch the short videos below and think about (and write notes beneath) the following questions while you watch them:

  • The application (as one of many techniques) of ideas such as Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions in order to comprehend the culture of a nation different than our own
  • Do you believe your nation to be a “We” culture country or a “Me” culture country, depending on your point of view? Do you agree with this generalization — does it ring true for your own personal experience of everyday society in general? What is the situation with your family? Do you find yourself more affected by “me” culture or “we” culture? If so, does this hold true for everyone in your family? Do you believe your nation to be a country with a Monochronic or Polychronic culture, depending on where you live? Do you agree with this generalization — do you think it is generally correct? What is the situation with your family? Is your attitude about time impacted by your cultural background? In what respects do you mean? If so, does this hold true for everyone in your family? What are the drawbacks and disadvantages of applying a generalized theory to the interpretation of culture at the level of a particular country or region? What can we do to overcome them?

Intercultural Communication is influenced by a variety of factors. A brief introduction of Hofstede’s cultural dimensions theory and how it might be used to aid in the development of intercultural understanding is provided in this short animated clip. The first four aspects of the theory are discussed in detail in the film: Power distance, individualism vs. collectivism, uncertainty avoidance, and Masculinity vs. Femininity are all topics covered in this chapter. Is it about me or about us? The Cultural Distinction Between the East and the West What role does your culture have in determining your ideas on family, individualism, and even food sharing?

In what ways are monochronic and polychronic civilizations distinct from one another?

Every day, no matter who we are, we are faced with 86,400 seconds to utilize, waste, spend, or preserve our energy.

Depending on where you live in the globe, you have evolved your own perspective on time and what it means in terms of how you go about your daily activities and activities.

Exploring Deep Culture

If you finished station 3, this activity will be added to the worksheet you created for that part. If you did not complete station 3, this activity will be added to your worksheet from that section. Otherwise, you could wish to utilize one of the worksheets given or create a graphic depiction of your own such as an iceberg, a tree, a spider diagram, or any similar structure (see worksheet example). Consider the deep culture sections “Belief and Values,” “Relationships and Roles,” and “Attitudes and Norms” with reference to the following sources (we will complete “communication” at Station 5) based on the following sources:

  • Individual cultural profiles
  • A cultural atlas
  • A world culture dictionary
  • Country culture guides
  • And more.

Prior to writing notes in each of the three sections, consider the following questions and discuss them with members of your family (as well as members of your other social groups, if possible). Beliefs and values are important.

  • What are the general ideas held by individuals of your nationality, ethnicity, social groupings, or family that you are aware of? (For example, spiritual, religious, moral, ethical, economic, and political opinions, as well as perspectives on social, environmental, and other world concerns, are all examples of beliefs.) What are the values that are held in common by your country, communities, social groupings, and extended family? Views on freedom, equality, fairness, laws, pride, humility
  • Beauty
  • Sportsmanship
  • And wisdom are some examples of what could be considered. Which of these characteristics are consistent or inconsistent throughout the many cultural influences in your life
  • Are any of them in disagreement with one another or contradictory? What are the ways in which they are impacted by history and tradition? Is it a part of your formal education to have them? If these common views and values have any impact on your own beliefs and behaviors (if they do), please explain how.

Relationships and responsibilities

  • What are the prevalent attitudes toward family, friendship, and love relationships held by individuals of your nationality, ethnicity, social groupings, or family that are generally accepted? Are these the same or different throughout the many cultural influences that have shaped you throughout your life? Are any of them in disagreement with one another or contradictory? What is the size of your family and how is it organized? Is there a total of how many individuals in your household? Do you have any brothers or sisters? How often do you have interactions with your extended family members? Grandparents? Do you have any aunts, uncles, or cousins? What level of involvement do you have in each other’s life
  • Who is in charge of making family decisions? What level of freedom do various members of the family have? Is this different for people of different ages or genders or for those who have distinct factors? How frequently your family gathers depends on whether or not there are certain cultural customs in place. Do you believe your family is representative of the “normal” family in your country?

Attitudes and societal norms

  • Expectations about how people feel, behave, and think (referred to as the ABC model – emotional, behavioural, and cognitive) are often held by individuals of your nationality, ethnicity, social groupings, or family. What types of emotional expression are acceptable (for example, is it OK to express rage, is it acceptable to cry in public)
  • What is thought to be good and bad in today’s society? What are the taboos and laws in this area? What manners, customs, and etiquette are considered to be typical in today’s society? Is there anything that is explicitly prohibited? What level of judging is present among others
  • If so, how does this compare to or differ from the many cultural influences in your life
  • Are any of them in disagreement with one another or contradictory? What are the ways in which they are impacted by history and tradition? Is it a part of your formal education to have them? What, if any, effect do you think these attitudes and conventions have on your own behavior?

Consolidate your learning

Review your notes on the deep culture area of your diagram, and examine the following:

  • Describe how they compare to the traditions or stereotypes that are connected with your nationality. What does this tell us about the cultural variety that exists within your nation? What do you believe this means in terms of comparisons with other countries? Make a mental note of your ideas
  • Is it possible to count how many distinct cultures have had an impact on your life? Specifically, what does this say about the limitations of generalizations, stereotyped beliefs, and assumptions we make about the deep culture of others based on their nationality, race, ethnicity, or other distinct interpretation of their culture
  • And When you think about deep culture, what does your own account reveal about the constraints of establishing international understanding only on the basis of nationality?

So far we have learned that the inhabitants of any nation are individually a fusion of the numerous cultural influences that have shaped their personality, established their behavioural conventions, and defined their perspective on the world on an individual level. The only way to truly comprehend another person is to communicate with them – to put prejudices aside, to be interested, to ask questions, to listen, and to notice their responses.

Research Activity: Find out in Five

Make a list of five important questions that someone from another nation or culture would need to ask you in order to gain a better understanding of yourself based on the findings you’ve made about the profound cultural influences that have shaped your life thus far. Consider how you would respond to those questions, as well as how you would illustrate the impacts of cultural influence on your answers. Then think about what five questions you’d want to respectfully ask them in return.

Is the content of the questions the same? To what degree is your curiosity influenced by your cultural background, and to what extent is it influenced by personal interests that are unconnected to your cultural background? The next step is to

What is the difference between surface and deep culture?

Surface Culture is a term used to describe the way things seem on the surface of things. Culture on the surface refers to the physical conventions that are frequently linked with a certain culture. Deep culture, on the other hand, refers to those cultural standards that are not visible to the naked eye. Surface culture is, in essence, the cultural norms that can be easily identified in a foreign environment. In depth culture refers to cultural standards that can only be identified after one has been born and raised in a particularculture OR when one has spent an extensive period of time in a certain foreignculture.

  1. Understanding the Influence of Cultural Elements There are several noticeable cultural distinctions.
  2. Aspects of culture that are visible include artifacts, symbols, and practices such as: art and architecture; language, color, and dress; social etiquette and customs; and social etiquette and traditions What exactly is aspect culture, in this context?
  3. As a result, culture encompasses a wide range of societal features, including language, conventions, values, norms, mores, laws, tools, technology, goods, organizations, and institutions, amongst other things.
  4. 1.Shallow The process of modeling culture begins with an empirical description of behavior and then proceeds “from the outside in,” without changing the level of analysis (which is often physical) or the explanatory metaphor (usually mechanical or probabilistic).
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Elements of Surface and Deep Culture Surface Culture / elements-of-surface-and-deep-culture-surface-culture.pdf

1ElementsofSurfaceanddeepCulture The examples that follow are intended to highlight cultural variety and should not be taken to be true for all members of a cultural group in question. Surface Culture: Foods are comprised of both foods and eating patterns/habits. Patriotic holidays, religious observances, personal rites and festivities are all celebrated. Visual and performing arts, music, and theatre are all examples of arts. Myths, fables, stories, fairy tales, folk songs, proverbs, riddles, jokes, limericks, poetry, rhymes, and games from folklore are all included here.

  1. Historical, contemporary, and local characters are all represented.
  2. Children are taught to shake hands with adults in certain cultures because it is considered a polite greeting.
  3. Bowing the head gently is the most common way to say greetings in Japanese.
  4. However, because the adult is seen as a figure of authority in many cultures, it is considered impolite to stare the instructor in the eyes.
  5. Although it appears to be false modesty, it is only an illustration of the Confucian notion of responding to praise with modesty, a philosophy that has been practiced for more than two millennia.
  6. o While most people nowadays have the option of picking their partners, weddings in some Arab and East Indian traditions are still arranged by mutual permission of the two families involved.
  7. They have no legal or marital rights, and they are required to submit to their husbands.

o Community property rules, which provide that women are entitled to half of their husbands’ wealth after marriage, are derived from Spanish law.

Because of the Spanish influence in this region, the bulk of the states that have such laws are located in the Southwestern United States.

Platage is a type of common-law marriage that is practiced by the vast majority of Haitians from less affluent socioeconomic backgrounds.

Aesthetics is the art of looking good (the beautiful things ofCulture: literature, music, dance, art, architecture, and how they are enjoyed).

Five, while some cultures will not use complementary colors on the color wheel together, such as red and green, others will find the juxtaposition of these colors to be beautiful.

Among Asian cultures, the centuries-old practice of bonsai, or the cultivation of dwarfed plants, exemplifies the importance placed on miniature objects and represents the value placed on miniature objects.

Who would argue that the color blue in the sky and the color blue in the ocean are the same?

6.

It is still true that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, even in today’s world.

Ethical considerations (how a person learns and practices honesty, fair play, principles, moral thought, etc.).

If you look at it from a different cultural perspective, what some classroom teachers consider cheating may be viewed as helping one another.

7 Living consists in achieving success in one’s existence or in one’s survival to the greatest extent possible.

When the law is represented by a human being, it is easier to comprehend it.

According to Lao culture, being an adult means being completely self-sufficient and dependent on one’s own resources.

o The way people bond varies depending on their cultural background.

😯 Some cultures have housing patterns that are shared by multiple generations.

A wide variety of cultures recognize the importance of extended family relationships.

o The family nucleus is the focal point of Haitian life, and this includes all members of the family.

It covers everything from dealing with crises to counseling to healthcare to marriage to travel to making educational decisions.

9Medicine and Health Care (how a person reacts to sickness, death, soundness of mind and body, medicine, etc.).

Teas made from a plant’s roots, bark, and leaves are still used today, just as they have been for hundreds of years.

Curanderismo, the practice of consulting with traditional healers, is still practiced by some Hispanics.

o Coining (Cao gio) is a common practice in Asian countries, particularly in the Philippines.

It is believed that this practice will help to release excess force wind from the body, allowing the body to return to balance.

Giclée o Cupping (Giac): A series of small, heated glasses are placed on the skin, creating a suction and a red circular mark that draws out the negative force.

Although many of these practices are performed on young children, including infants, it should be noted that the temporary dermabrasions that result from them should not be confused with abuse or injury.

Surface cultures – Microbiology

Surface culture is the term used to describe the bacterial and fungal analysis of swabs taken from superficial and nonsurgical locations in order to diagnose infection.

Specimen requirements

Swabs should be submitted for testing in a suitable transport medium and should be transferred and evaluated as soon as feasible after collection. A per-nasal swab should be provided for Bordetella culture; a fine wire swab is available from the Microbiology Department or from the Haematology Stores- please phone 20368 from inside the Trust if specimen transport may be delayed, as in primary care.

Specimen types

  • Surface swabs (leg ulcers)
  • Wound swabs (excluding post-operative hospital wounds)
  • Ear swabs (except for the formastoid cavity)
  • Ear swabs (except for the formastoid cavity). Except for corneal scrapings, eye swabs are used. The use of newborn infants’ septic screening
  • Tips (save for vascular line tips and ETT tips)
  • Penile swabs (other than for suspected STI)
  • Vulval swabs
  • Throat swabs
  • Nose swabs
  • Mouth swabs
  • Per-nasal swabs (for Bordetella culture)

Indications of recent surgery and antibiotic therapy should be included with the site samples request.

Laboratory turnaround time

Please refer to the turn-around times.

Laboratory method

Samples are grown on a selection of inhibitory and non-inhibitory culture medium in order to separate any possible pathogens from the aforesaid specimens. The results of this culture are reported in Table 1. The AST/ID branch of the laboratory is in charge of bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, among other things. These samples were shown to include the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and beta-haemolytic Streptococci, which are the most often seen.

Where to find results of these tests

  • In cases where it is feasible (EPR, SunquestICE), all results are returned electronically. Some data may be delivered through phone to doctors and general practitioners. The laboratory personnel never directly communicates with patients about their results.

Further information and contact details

If you require any further information, please contact: [email protected] Only accounts with the domain nhs.net should be used to send confidential patient information. Manual for Microbiology Laboratory Personnel (pdf, 684 KB)

Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Moving Below the Surface

Dr. Michelle Yzquierdo contributed to this article.

The Cultural Proficiency Continuum

Due to the rising diversity of the student population across the country, we find ourselves in front of lovely youngsters who do not look or sound like us more and more regularly. Many in education try to make up for this disparity by adopting a colorblind attitude, acting as if cultural differences are trivial or do not impact in any way. By taking a look at the cultural proficiency continuum (see Figure 1), which depicts how an entity responds to variety, it becomes clear that being colorblind is unquestionably a preferable alternative to being culturally damaging or culturally incapable of responding to difference.

A color-blind person’s standard reaction is frequently something along the lines of “I don’t see race” or “I treat all my kids the same.” To be quite honest, I’m sure I said something along those lines when I was a rookie instructor.

Cross and colleagues (1989) define cultural competence as “the ability to understand and interact with others from a variety of cultural backgrounds.”

Aspects of Surface Culture

What is the best way to become culturally literate? There is certainly no shortage of blogs, webinars, articles, books, and trainings on how to respond correctly to students from a variety of backgrounds and experiences. Many of these resources recommend activities such as commemorating diverse student holidays, hosting cultural exchange nights and international family events, purchasing books and other educational materials that reflect the diversity of your students, and representing your diverse students in your physical classroom space by posting maps, flags, and other diverse artifacts to represent your diverse students.

These suggestions are undoubtedly deserving of attention, and they serve as excellent examples of how to establish a friendly environment for your students from a variety of backgrounds.

Culture-appropriate activities, such as having a diversified student book shelf, celebrating Chinese New Year, offering tamales for parent/teacher night, greeting your Indian kids with “namaste,” or learning a few phrases of Arabic, are only the beginning of being culturally adept.

The deep culture values are something I challenge those of you who have mastered surface culture values (and who also have a fantastic tamale recipe) (see Figure 2).

Aspects of Deep Culture

One of the reasons that educators are drawn to features of surface culture is because they are easily accessible and observable. I can tell that the food consumed by my pupils and their families is distinct from the food consumed by myself. I am aware that my students observe holidays that are distinct from those observed by me. Surface cultural values are very straightforward to explore and apply into daily interactions with children and their families since they are simple to understand. Aspects of deep culture, on the other hand, are frequently a mystery, possibly even to the person who has them.

Furthermore, incorporating deeply held cultural beliefs into our work as educators is far more difficult.

Views on Time: Clock Time Versus Event Time

People in Western societies, such as the United States, are more likely than others to adhere to the concept of clock time, in which time is linear and individuals allow an external clock decide when duties begin and conclude. “Time is money,” as the adage goes, and time is perceived as being in short supply. Timing is frequently defined in terms of deadlines and due dates, and failing to achieve those deadlines is sometimes attributed to poor work ethic, ineffective time management, or a lack of enthusiasm on the part of the employee.

As soon as the first activity is completed, individuals in an event time culture switch to the next task, and connections frequently take precedence over any deadlines or due dates.

Views on Authority: Low Versus High Power Distance

Uneven power distributions are accepted and expected by individuals in varying degrees, and this is measured by the power gap between them and others. Simply said, certain cultures (high power-distance cultures) are more permissive of unequal power distribution than others (low power-distance cultures) (low power-distance cultures). An evident hierarchy of power will exist among individuals of a high power-distance society (such as that found in Latin America, Arab nations, and portions of Asia).

As a result, these cultures place a high value on compliance, and schools tend to be more teacher-centered.

It is teachers who are in charge of preserving the information that is to be imparted to the students.

There is greater equality between the sexes, and children are increasingly seen as equals.

In addition to having significant ramifications for kids, differences in power distance might very well be a source of cultural conflict for families from varied backgrounds.

So What?

A good initial step on your road to cultural competency is to investigate and put into practice some of the concepts listed above that target surface culture values. In the areas where I’ve worked, this has always been seen as “low-hanging fruit.” As an added bonus, I would advise you to look into some of the cultural values that are found below or near the bottom of the iceberg, or below the surface of the sea. Students’ relationships with us and with one another are profoundly influenced by these deeper cultural values, and they have the potential to have a significant impact on their academic achievement and success in school.

The more we learn and understand the values of other cultures (both surface and deep culture), the better we will be able to empathize with and engage with our beautiful and diverse students and their families and to adapt effectively to their needs.

Volume 1 of Towards a Culturally Competent System of Care (Towards a Culturally Competent System of Care).

Cultural Dimensionalization in Context: The Hofstede Model in Action.

Online Readings in Psychology and Culture.

(2008).

The Hebrew University is located in Jerusalem, Israel.

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