What Is Google Arts And Culture

Google Arts & Culture

Explore museums and have fun with Art Transfer, Pocket Galleries, Art Selfie, and other fun games and activities.

Museum explorer

A stylistic watershed moment This picture, created the same year that Kandinsky published his book ‘Point and Line to Plane,’ symbolizes a stylistic turning point since the line bends and there are gradations of color once more. The harmony of the elements The balance between components that are antagonistic and those that are complimentary is the foundation of this picture. geometric lines and bright colors may be seen on the left side of the page. To the right, sinuous shapes and dark colours are displayed.

Abstract art was invented by this artist.

Kandinsky’s color scheme of yellow, red, and blue was created in 1925.

Explore

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Reflection on the surface of a surface Amidst the dense concentration of water lilies, you can make out the reflection of the willow trees on the surface of the pond’s surface. Influence of the Japanese Japan’s art has clearly influenced Monet’s work, as seen by the design of the bridge, which he created himself. This is one of 18 canvases depicting this view of the bridge, each painted in a different light situation than the one before it. The sun is shining in the afternoon. The late afternoon sun shines a ray of light across the bridge, lighting the right-hand side in pale green and contrasting it with the opposite side, which is a deeper blue-green in coloration.

  • Hybrid Monet’s water lilies were a hybrid breed that he painted in a variety of colors, including pink, yellow, and white.
  • Colors on the undersides of water lilies include dark red, which is on the other side of the color wheel from green, which dominates the image.
  • Claude Monet’s Water-Lily Pond, painted in 1899.
  • Explore

Recommended for you

Take a look at the collection

Discover the art, culture, fashion, and music of Lisbon

Are you able to guess where this is? Answer: it’s a well-known archaelogical site in southern Italy. Image courtesy of CyArk Pompeii Project PartnersA view of the ruins of the Temple of Jupiter at Pompeii.

Sites to see from your sofa

That was the artist who painted this ‘Melancholy Woman’?

The hint is that they are credited with co-founding the Cubist movement. The Detroit Institute of Arts has a painting by Pablo Picasso titled Melancholy Woman.

Explore museums in the Philippines

Are you interested in seeing what Van Gogh’s Starry Night looks like up close and personal? Have you ever been on a tour of the ancient Maya temples or had the opportunity to meet some of the most inspirational personalities in Black history? Is it your dream to learn more about Japan’s distinctive cuisine culture or the wonderful Indian railways? It is possible to search for treasures, tales, and information from over 2,000 cultural institutions in 80 countries using Google ArtsCulture. Discover stories about our cultural past, ranging from the suffragettes who campaigned for women’s rights to the performing arts at the Paris Opera to NASA’s vault of spectacular photos.

  • Highlights: Art Transfer – Take a photograph and convert it into a work of art using classic artworks.
  • Color Palette – Use the colors in your photo to inspire you to create art.
  • Pocket Gallery – Take a stroll around immersive galleries and get up up and personal with artwork.
  • Step inside world-class museums with virtual reality tours.
  • Travel through time and see the rainbow through art – Travel through time and see the rainbow through art.
  • Favorites – Make a list of your favorite artworks and organize them into galleries to show to friends or pupils.
  • Notifications — Sign up to get weekly highlights or updates on your favorite pieces of content.
  • Translate – Notice of permissions: Geographical location: This is used to make recommendations for cultural attractions and events depending on your present location.
  • Contacts (Get Accounts): This feature is used to allow users to sign in using their Google Account, and to keep their likes and preferences.

‎Google Arts & Culture

Are you interested in seeing what Van Gogh’s Starry Night looks like up close and personal? Have you ever been on a tour of the ancient Maya temples or had the opportunity to meet some of the most inspirational personalities in Black history? Is it your dream to learn more about Japan’s distinctive cuisine culture or the wonderful Indian railways? It is possible to search for treasures, tales, and information from over 2,000 cultural institutions in 80 countries using Google ArtsCulture. Discover stories about our cultural past, ranging from the suffragettes who campaigned for women’s rights to the performing arts at the Paris Opera to NASA’s vault of spectacular photos.

  1. Highlights: Art Transfer – Take a photograph and convert it into a work of art using classic artworks.
  2. Color Palette – Use the colors in your photo to inspire you to create art.
  3. Pocket Gallery – Take a stroll around immersive galleries and get up up and personal with artwork.
  4. Step inside world-class museums with virtual reality tours.
  5. Travel through time and see the rainbow through art – Travel through time and see the rainbow through art.
  6. Favorites – Make a list of your favorite artworks and organize them into galleries to show to friends or pupils.
  7. Notifications — Sign up to get weekly highlights or updates on your favorite pieces of content.
  8. Translate – Notice of permissions: Geographical location: This is used to make recommendations for cultural attractions and events depending on your present location.
  9. Version 9.0.38 is the most recent available.

Is your pet’s photograph worthy of being shown in a museum? You may compare your pet’s photo with artwork from museums all over the world with Pet Portraits. The Camera menu has also been completely redesigned to provide a more immersive appearance and feel.

Ratings and Reviews

Rating: 4.7 out of 5133.7K votes

Google Arts and Culture

The Google Arts & Culture application is the sort of application that individuals who are interested in the cultures of the globe fantasize of having at their fingertips. To begin, the design is balanced, with a simple color backdrop and minimum text in regards to the categories and article titles, as shown below. From the bottom tab, users may quickly browse to the key areas of the application. Besides that, the app may be used in a variety of ways, such as ingesting knowledge from the material offered, which includes anything from classical artwork to writings on historical individuals to science and a variety of other topics.

Through the usage of Virtual Reality and Selfies, the app may even be viewed as an observational lens for the user.

The opportunity to develop your imagination alone makes it well worth the time investment to download.

Selfie option DOES work!

I’m not sure why folks are leaving negative reviews about the selfie feature, claiming that it doesn’t work, but it worked absolutely great in my experience. Two seconds were all it took for me to navigate down the main page, locate the selfie option, read about how it is new and experimental, snap a selfie, and look for things that looked similar to me. Possibly only certain smartphones are compatible with the selfie feature, but as the proud owner of an iPhone 6, I can attest that it is a fantastic feature.

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This software is fantastic, and I highly suggest it!

Works janky

This is a hit or miss proposition. To return to the previous page, there is occasionally a back button in the upper left corner of the screen. Occasionally, this is not the case. Not enough times have I had to return to the home screen of this program in order to re-search the place I had just been in to tell you how many times this has happened. For example, you may look for locations to visit. Select a place from the drop-down menu. Now attempt to go back to where you started. Yes, there is no back button, so you must return to Home, click Places, sort by alphabetical order once more, and then scroll once more.

Some galleries, in addition, do not enable you to zoom in on the artworks displayed there.

I did not purchase this massive iPad in order to view little images that do not enable me to zoom in.

More information can be found in the privacy policy of the developer.

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Data Not Linked to You

The following information may be gathered, but it will not be connected to your personal identity: For example, depending on the features you use or your age, your privacy practices may be different. Read on to find out more

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Tool Snapshot

Price Free
Learning ConstructivismConnectivism
Ease of Use ★★★✩✩
Privacy ★✩✩✩✩
Accessibility ★★★✩✩
Class Size Unlimited
Login Yes for curating; No for exploring
ISTE*S Knowledge ConstructorCreative Communicator
COPPA/ FERPA No

Ease of Use

Google Arts and Culture is a highly user-friendly search engine. The majority of the application’s functionality are accessible by point-and-click, and Google’s user interface is well-designed. In this area, we deducted a star because we felt that the amount of information originally displayed is a little overwhelming, particularly for first-time users. If you tried to read all of the different types of information on the site, it would take a very long time. Additionally, the app has a tendency to deplete your phone’s battery quite rapidly.

  1. An overheated laptop in one of our tech demos caused the fans on the gadget to run so hard that it began buzzing.
  2. As a result, we deducted another star from the overall ranking.
  3. In order to engage the user, Google employs ambiguous beginning places in their “Explore” tab on their website.
  4. Users will find it simpler to interact with the site since the material is organized in a straightforward and natural manner, rather than feeling overburdened.
  5. Consider the following example: a Google search for “Grandma Moses” returns her biography (which was sourced on the Internet from Wikipedia), but it also returns works by Moses Wainer Dykaar.
  6. Given the absence of curation, this is a site that is best suited for individuals who already have some knowledge of art or who are being taught by a teacher who is knowledgeable about art.
  7. There is nudity in some artwork as well as acts of violence and other material that may be considered unsuitable for younger audiences.
  8. Because of the way the works are presented, it is not always easy to determine whether or not they are protected by copyright.

Please use caution when duplicating content discovered on Google Arts & Culture in any manner that may be labeled “for-profit” or “non-academic,” just like you should with anything you encounter on the Internet.

Privacy

Because Google Arts and Culture is not a component of the Google Workspace Suite, it is not covered by the COPPA and FERPA laws, as is the case with other Google products. For many of its features, you’ll need to sign up for a Google account (though you may browse on free). You’ll also need to download the Google app for your smartphone in order to take use of many of its features. Users are encouraged to download the app—and thereby enable Google access to their smartphone data—because the smartphone version is far more developed and comprehensive than the PC version.

This information is sold to third-party websites that will utilize the data for marketing reasons, allowing the sites to benefit from the personal information of their visitors.

Accessibility

The accessibility of Google Arts and Culture is a little difficult to figure out. There are still some major accessibility issues with the movies and interactive games, even while they include both audio and subtitles, and elements that rely on Google’s other apps, such as YouTube videos, apply those sites’ accessible features. In light of the fact that this platform is highly reliant on visuals, alternate text is essential for users who rely on screen readers; yet, alternate text is not always featured on visuals, particularly those held by third-party organizations.

Similarly, there are no filters or tools that may be used to aid color-blind people.

Class SizeCollaboration

It is difficult to navigate Google Arts & Culture because of its limited accessibility. There are still some major accessibility issues with the movies and interactive games, even while they include both audio and subtitles, and features that rely on Google’s other apps, such as YouTube videos, incorporate other sites’ accessible features. Considering how much this platform relies upon images, alternate text is essential for users who use screen readers; nevertheless, different text is not always provided on images, particularly those belonging to third-party organizations.

There are no color-blind-friendly filters or features available, either.

ISTE Standards

Knowledge Constructor: Students may create their own galleries, connect pieces of art from different periods of time or from different artists, and add information about the artworks they have chosen to display. In a nutshell, Google Arts and Culture gives students the ability to function as art historians.

Students can use art to express ideas, as well as communicate ideas via art, as part of their creative communicator role. Google Arts and Culture provides a plethora of resources for this purpose, including the ability to create galleries and walkthroughs, as well as other tools and apps.

Google Arts and Culture video

When it comes to technology adoption in the classroom, theSAMR model, founded by Dr. Ruben Puentedura, provides a useful lens through which to look. In order to foster educational innovation and change, we urge that this model be used as an analytical tool. The following is an explanation of how Google Arts and Culture fits into the SAMR model:

  • Students can utilize Google Arts and Culture instead of visiting to a museum or reading through art publications to supplement their learning. Students can supplement their study by utilizing Google Arts and Culture products, which are available for free. Consider the following example: students can investigate the entrance of dyestuffs into Europe during the Age of Exploration by evaluating the increased use of specific hues over the historical period
  • And Students may utilize key search phrases to investigate historical movements, quickly construct portfolios of work from a given time period, and examine what it says about the culture and change, and especially change over time, using the database-like features of Google Arts and Culture. Modification: Social class, ethnicity, and gender roles are all topics that students might incorporate into their portfolios. Redefinition: Students may utilize Google Arts & Culture’s digital capabilities to explore art and history in ways that were previously impossible due to technological limitations, such as gallery walks around different nations or the usage of art filters in photographs and movies. A meta-project in which students critique Google Arts and Culture’s representation of socioeconomic class, color, disability, and gender roles can also be completed by the students.

Technology is frequently utilized as a replacement for conventional educational methods (like a field trip to a museum). However, while substitution has some advantages, such as allowing students to become more comfortable working with technology, the use of Google Arts and Culture and other advanced technology tools has the potential to completely reshape how students perform educational tasks and interact with their environment.

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Learning Activities

A data-driven approach may be used to generate statistics and conduct analysis of Google Arts & Culture results. Can you tell me how many pieces are depicting people of color? How many of them are written by persons of color? Is there a difference depending on the time period or historical era? What are the ramifications of these statistics?

Science

The history of science and the history of art are inextricably linked. The study of principles like as optics, perspective, anatomy, the electromagnetic spectrum, color science, and the development of scientific method may be accomplished via the use of visual artifacts such as paintings and drawings.

English/Language Arts

Art and writing go together like peanut butter and jelly. In addition to having students write about art, many artworks are influenced by literature; literary trends, like art movements, are part of the same zeitgeist. As an example, students can draw connections between Delacroix and Victor Hugo, while Picasso, Miró, and Man Ray can enrich a reading of Hemingway or John Dos Passos.

Other

It goes without saying that Google Arts & Culture is a great fit for history and art programs. All kinds of things, from ancient relics to nineteenth-century thoughts on race, are represented and might be utilized to enrich classroom lessons.

Resources

  • St. Francis College Library hosts a Google Arts & Culture event. Learn about arts and culture with Google Arts and Culture
  • 3 Tips for Teachers on Using Google Arts and Culture
  • Review of Common Sense Education Practices
  • Google Arts and Culture has 15 history lesson ideas for you. Applied Digital Skills in the Arts and Culture with Google Arts and Culture
  • Google Arts & Culture is featured in the EdTech Magazine. (From the Point of View of an Educator) An Introduction to Google Arts and Culture
  • Google Arts and Culture Celebrates Its Tenth Anniversary (Google blog)

How to Use Google Arts and Culture

  • Although there are several navigation options available from the landing page, if you want access to certain services that need customisation, such as curating art galleries, you will need to establish or login into your Google account. If you want to Sign Up or Log In, click the blue button in the upper right corner of the screen.
  • Choose between logging in using your Google credentials or clicking on the Establish an account link, which will take you to a form where you can set up a new Google account
  • Or click on the Create an account link on the bottom-left of the field to create a new Google account.
  • To get started, simply fill out the boxes provided, go over Google’s privacy policies, agree to their terms, and you’ll be good to go.

Research

  • A. L. Blackwood is an American author and poet. In Curating Inequality: The Relationship Between Cultural Reproduction and Race in the Visual Arts, edited by M.L. Bothelo and colleagues Designing exhibitions at the Google Cultural Institute: a dialogue between pedagogical experiences and the creation of heritage diffusion products
  • R. Wahyuningtyas,Eliminating Boundaries in Learning Culture Through Technology: A Review of Google Arts and Culture
  • M. Udell,The Museum of the Infinite Scroll: Assessing the Effectiveness of Google Arts and Culture as a Virtual Tool for Museum Accessibility
  • R. Wahyuningtyas,Eliminating Bo

Hunter Proulx, Ken Mondschein, and Earnest Thomas collaborated on the creation of this page.

What is Google Arts & Culture?

2011 saw the introduction of Google ArtsCulture, a non-profit program that was developed in collaboration with 17 of the world’s most recognized institutions. The objective was to make the art and culture of the globe available to everyone on the internet. Google is teaming together with artists and cultural organizations to conserve and make the world’s art and culture available to everyone, no matter where they reside. This partnership comprises more than 1500 museums and cultural organizations, resulting in millions of cultural items being made available online as a result of this collaboration.

Google ArtsCulture’s Features

The project contains a plethora of information and features that will need you to spend many days exploring.

They are available in a variety of formats, including:

Zoom Views

With the use of high-tech cameras, Google has caught several artworks. You will be able to zoom in and view unprecedented levels of detail as a result of this. Vincent Van Gogh’s painting The Starry Night is an example of this. When you zoom in close enough, you can see the brushstrokes.

Virtual Museum Tours

You may take a virtual tour of the museum using Google Street-View technology, and you can see exhibits in their natural environment, no matter where you are. Visualize yourself roaming the halls of London’s Natural History Museum, taking a tour of The Frick Collection, and other activities.

Educational Content

Additionally, there are various online exhibitions, video interviews, and articles, in addition to curatorial annotations for individual works of art. You may learn more about the collections listed in the section Arts and Culture Experiments by exploring and learning more about them using technology. If you have a YouTube account, you may view the video material produced by Google Arts and Culture on your smartphone or tablet. You may also gain access to this project using a mobile application.

Explore and Discover

A user may locate artworks quickly and simply by restricting searches according to nation, artists, dates, historical events, museums, art movements, and other criteria. For example,

Create Your Own Collections

You may create your own gallery using your Google account, where you can store your artworks and artifacts for future reference.

Google ArtsCulture’s Hidden Treasures

Bagan, Myanmar, is a city filled of temples, as you can see here: Despite the fact that an earthquake struck Myanmar in 2016 and severely damaged many of the country’s temples, Google, in collaboration with CyArk, was able to preserve this metropolis of a thousand temples in 3D digital archives. You may take a virtual tour of the facility by clicking here. History of Space Exploration: The Space Shuttle Discovery, which was utilized in the deployment of the Hubble Space Telescope in 1990, is one of NASA’s most illustrious orbiters.

The Story of a Legendary Queen: This is the story of Nefertiti, the most powerful and prominent lady in ancient Egypt, whose name literally translates as “the Beautiful One Has Come.” The Neue Museum has her fully unique bust, which is the only one of its kind in the world.

Japan’s Traditional Workmanship: Japanese crafts and traditions may teach you valuable lessons in the art of craftsmanship that have been passed down through generations.

Here’s where you may find Japanese crafts that have been lost or rediscovered.

The calligraphy of Ouyang Xun is one of the earliest surviving items in that collection, dating back to the 15th century. It is about Bu Shang or Zixia, who was the most outstanding pupil and lived between 770 and 476 BCE. More information on him may be found here.

Google Arts & Culture Review for Teachers

Artists, culture, and historical treasures from across the world are accessible for free through Google ArtsCulture, which is available as both a website and an iOS or Android app. The website is well-organized and straightforward to use. Using it, users may search for certain museums’ collections or topics, and they can filter their results by movement, artist, historic event or historical figure, media, and other criteria. When browsing through materials, students may readily compare works from the same time period based on their physical location on a map, the prevalent color, or a chronology.

  • Additionally, in addition to more traditional museum holdings, visitors will have the opportunity to explore notable places and monuments and to take in outdoor art installations as well as non-art locales such as the CERN particle accelerator.
  • In some cases, you can use the Explore Connections option, which is almost like a two-dimensional stream of consciousness array, linking images together based on criteria such as location and material.
  • The site contains the most recent news on museums, collections, and events, as well as information about local sites to visit in person (with media of their collections).
  • In researching a historical event, for example, students will find curated tales, photographs, objects, and timelines from a variety of collections, which they may use to further their understanding.
  • Users may “like” any of the materials on the site in addition to simply browsing them, and they can conveniently access them all from the Favorites page.
  • One feature to keep an eye out for and be cautious about is the Art Selfie option.
  • Users may snap a selfie and have it matched with artworks from the app’s collection using this function.

Despite the fact that students are likely to enjoy this feature, the learning potential and privacy concerns are minimal. Also criticized is the fact that this tool provides just a small number of excellent matches for persons of color.

Arts & Culture Experiments – Experiments with Google

With Google ArtsCulture, you may play with experiments at the intersection of art and technology, developed by artists and creative coders.

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All ArtsCulture Experiments

According to Dr. Elizabeth Harmon of Smithsonian Libraries and Archives’ Digital Curation Department. Professor Dr. Lynn Cherny of the Google Arts and Culture Lab Developing machine learning technologies to assist Smithsonian curators in uncovering the history and culture of the United States.

Pollinator Pathmaker

Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg and the Google Arts and Culture Lab created this piece. Create your own pollinator-friendly landscape that is uniquely yours.

Voices for Change

ByGoogle Arts and Culture Lab’Voices for Change – A Global Goals World’ brings thousands of voices in favor of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals to life.

Chopin Everywhere

Submitted by Gael Hugo, Artist in Residence at the Google Arts & Culture Lab. This Chrome extension is a simple method to learn more about the life of Fryderyk Chopin while browsing the web.

The Mo Amin Archive

Artists in Residence at Google ArtsCulture Lab Simon Doury, Nicolas Barradeau, and Gael Hugo have created new work. With the aid of, you may discover a visual history of frontline photojournalist Mo Amin’s archive.

The Klimt Color Enigma

Emil Wallner and Romain Cazier, artists in residence at the Google Arts and Culture Lab, contributed this article. Paintings by Gustav Klimt that have long since vanished are being recolored by artificial intelligence and Klimt experts.

Fourth of July Fireworks Game

Submitted by Jonathan Tanant, Christine Sugrue, and Nicolas Barradeau, who are now Artists in Residence at the Google Arts and Culture Lab Your job this Fourth of July is to organize the spectacular fireworks display!

Slogans for the Class of 2030

Douglas Coupland contributed to this article. Douglas Coupland partnered with Google researchers to create a new set of slogans that were based on the Google search engine.

Paint with Music

artists in residence at Google Arts & Culture Lab Simon Doury and Caroline Buttet Make your paintbrushes become musical instruments and compose on sensory canvases using your imagination!

Assisted Melody

Authored by Simon Doury, Artist in Residence at Google ArtsCulture Lab in collaboration with Google Magenta. Compose tunes in the manner of a maestro.

PATHOS Robotic Animation Tool

ByPorsRaoArtists PorsRao is developing PATHOS, which is a user-friendly robotic animation tool.

Cold Flux

Ben Cullen Williams contributed to this article. Bryce Cronkite-Ratcliffe is a television personality. Cold Flux draws attention to the dangers posed by our global icecaps, while also raising the question of whether the melting is inevitable.

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Google Arts & Culture

As the second cultural institution in Western Pennsylvania (after The Frick Pittsburgh) to join the Google ArtsCulture platform, the Heinz History Center is thrilled to be partnering with the Google Cultural Institute and becoming the first of its kind. More information about this collaboration may be found in our recent press release. On Google Arts and Culture, you may go through the History Center’s collections, which include presidential history, Black History Month items, antique valentines, and the history of the Heinz Company.

  • Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood, which is packed with teachings and concepts from its predecessor program, allows a new generation of youngsters to hear Mister Rogers’ voice for the first time in years.
  • In the now-closed Pixburghexhibition at the History Center, the ‘Burghoffers were given a sneak preview of only a few of the hundreds of photographs on display.
  • Take a look at the display below!
  • It is part of the “Once Upon a Try” theme for Google ArtsCulture, which includes this exhibit.
  • TheFromFarm toFamily with the Heinz Collectionexhibition is now available on Google Arts & Culture’s Google Arts & Culture website.
  • Take a look at the display below!
  • Marinaro,Highlights from the Italian American Collection, and analyzes the History Center’s Italian American Collection.
  • In Meadowcroft: The Making of a Historic Site, you may track the site’s development from a camping to a historic landmark.
  • Take a look at the display below!
  • The exhibition explores more than 150 years of presidential history with a Western Pennsylvania connection.
  • Over a thousand organizations across the world are participating in Google ArtsCulture, which is a new, immersive way to explore art, history, culture, and global marvels.

In collaboration with the Google Cultural Institute, Google Arts & Culture has been developed and made freely available for use on the web, on iOS, and on Android devices for everyone. More information may be found here.

Google Arts & Culture

Google ArtsCulture, which was established in 2011, aims to provide museum visitors with access to an unlimited library of exhibitions, monuments, and other notable pieces of art. The digital preservation of that work gives opportunity for future generations to be inspired by it. “The Grohmann Museum is joining the Google Cultural Institute to make the collection more readily available to a worldwide audience,” stated James Kieselburg, director of the Grohmann Museum. However, although there is no alternative for seeing things in person, the interactive capabilities that will be available alongside our collection online will undoubtedly enhance the experience for visitors from a distance.” Take a peek at the miracles that a simple internet connection may deliver for you.

A selection of paintings from the Man at Work Collection, which is kept in the Grohmann Museum at the Milwaukee School of Engineering, that are both unusually beautiful and historically significant.

Featuring a selection of German paintings from the Grohmann Museum collection, as well as information on the ‘Heroic School’ of industrial painting, this exhibition will be of interest to art lovers.

Spitzweg’s art has made its way to Milwaukee in the form of more than twenty pieces.

Google Arts & Culture – App Review

While the inclusion of the art-selfie function may have helped it get widespread attention, it is much more than that. After you’ve had a good chuckle at the outcomes of your selfie experiments, you can move on to exploring the rest of Google ArtsCulture’s offerings. If you do, you’ll discover that it’s actually amazing. There’s a lot to see and learn about here, including museum information, theater, music, travel, and profiles of individuals from a variety of origins and cultures, all of which is presented in a way that makes full advantage of the latest technological advances.

Immerse yourself in world heritage locations with 360-degree video recordings or use your preferred virtual reality gadget to spend a day in a museum halfway across the world.

These technological platforms bring all of this knowledge to vivid, colorful life in a way that is both engaging and thrilling for both children and their parents.

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