What Is A Co-culture

Chapter Outline

  1. Both culture and co-culture are defined as the language, beliefs, traditions, and practices that are shared and taught by a group of people. A person’s perspective and concept of culture are important considerations. In co-culture, the perception of belonging to a group that is a component of a larger culture is expressed.
  1. Groups with which we identify are referred to as in-groups. Out-groups are groups that we consider to be distinct from us. The component of one’s self-concept that is founded on one’s belonging to a group is referred to as social identity.
  1. It is the process that happens when individuals of two or more cultures or co-cultures communicate messages in a way that is impacted by their differing cultural perspectives and symbol systems, both verbal and nonverbal, in order to achieve mutual understanding. S alience is defined as the weight that is linked to a certain person or phenomenon. Figure 2.2 depicts a model that illustrates the relationship between interpersonal relationships and intercultural communication and demonstrates that some interpersonal transactions do not contain any cultural elements while others are almost entirely intercultural and do not include any personal dimensions. Cultural distinctions are diverse, since there are different ways in which communication differs from one culture to the next. It is possible that there are more distinctions within cultures than there are between civilizations.
  • Five subtle but important values and norms that affect the way individuals of a society communicate are captured by five subtle but important values and norms
  1. High-context versus low-context cultures— Low-context cultures rely significantly on subtle, often nonverbal indicators to preserve social harmony, whereas high-context cultures rely heavily on overt, often nonverbal cues to maintain social harmony. When it comes to helping themselves, members of anindividualistic culture see their primary responsibility as helping themselves, as opposed to members of an acollectivistic culture, who see their primary responsibility as helping their in-group
  2. The degree to which individuals of a community tolerate an unequal allocation of power is described by the term “power gap.” Uncertainty avoidance is a word that is used to describe the degree to which individuals of a culture feel threatened by uncertain circumstances and the extent to which they attempt to avoid them. Achievement cultures place a high value on material success and concentrating on the task at hand, whereas nurturing cultures place a high value on the support of relationships and focusing on the task at hand
  1. Race is a category that was formed to describe variations between individuals whose ancestors originated in various parts of the world, such as Africa and Europe. When it comes to describing individual variations, race is a secondary factor
  2. Ethnicity is more typically employed. One’s ethnicity is the degree to which a person feels they belong to a group, generally on the basis of nationality, culture, or some other common point of view.
  1. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) are all types of people who identify as LGBTQ.
  1. Being honest can help people feel more real and that they are part of a supportive co-culture
  2. But, disclosure can be dangerous. People may be taken aback or judge you harshly. The social atmosphere has been more accepting of LGBTQ persons than it had been in the previous years.
  1. Age-related communication reflects both culture and biology in equal measure. We learn how to “do” different ages as we progress through life. Western societies place a high value on youth, and views on aging are overwhelmingly negative rather than positive. People who assume that older persons have communication difficulties are less inclined to contact with them and, when they do connect, are more likely to use condescending language. When various generations come together to work, communication difficulties might result.
  1. People’s communication styles can be significantly influenced by their social status. People in the United States categorize themselves as working class, middle class, or upper class. First-generation college (FGC) students may experience intercultural strain as a result of having to live in two different worlds.
  • Due to the fact that various cultures have diverse verbal and nonverbal communication methods, codes are tied to culture.
  1. The verbal codes used by different languages throughout the world are both similar and distinct.
  1. Linguistics and identity — If you live in a community where everyone speaks the same language, then language has minimal influence on your sense of self. In contrast, when some members speak a dominant language and some members speak a minority language, a strong sense of belonging to an out-group is felt. Three cultural distinctions can be identified in verbal communication styles:
  1. It is possible to be direct or indirect
  2. To be elaborate and concise, or to be formalandinformal.
  • Nonverbal communication is something that all humans have in common. There is a vast range of variances in nonverbal behavior between people. Messages are decoded
  1. In attribution, someone else’s action is interpreted in order to make sense of it. Because most behavior is ambiguous and might have numerous meanings, the attribution process can result in incorrect interpretations.
  1. The desire to converse successfully with strangers, as well as with people from various cultures, is described by motivation and attitude, respectively. When dealing with communicators from other cultures, one’s level of tolerance for ambiguity is determined by the level of uncertainty one is comfortable with. To be effective intercultural communicators, one must be willing to embrace and encourage uncertainty. It is necessary to be open-minded in order to be free of ethnocentrism, which is the belief that one’s own culture is superior to others, and prejudice, which is a harsh and intolerant attitude toward people who are members of an out-group. To be effective communicators, communicators must have a thorough understanding of other cultures and be able to identify appropriate communication strategies.
  1. The desire to successfully converse with strangers, as well as persons from various cultures, is described by motivation and attitude. When dealing with communicators from other cultures, one’s level of tolerance for ambiguity is determined by how comfortable one is with uncertainty. To be effective intercultural communicators, one must be willing to tolerate and embrace uncertainty. When one is open-minded, he or she is free of ethnocentrism, which is the belief that one’s own culture is superior to others, and prejudice, which is a harsh and intolerant attitude toward people who are members of an out-group. To be effective communicators, communicators must have a thorough understanding of various cultures and be able to identify acceptable communication tactics.
  1. To make the transition from culture shock to adaption, patience and endurance are required.

what is co-cultural communication? why is co-cultural communication important?

Within each civilization, there are a variety of diverse groups, each with its own set of values and customs, and each of these groups interacts in a variety of ways. Co-cultural communication is the term used to describe communication between these two groups. The way in which relationships between different cultures present themselves is intimately tied to the formal and informal institutions of that society, since these institutions influence the capacities of different groups to negotiate power and significance with one another.

  • Understanding and studying these relationships, as well as the mechanisms that facilitate them, may be performed via the use of the framework provided by co-cultural theory.
  • Having the tools to comprehend these processes is vital in today’s increasingly varied society, which is filled with people and groups that have values and ideas that are diametrically opposed to those of the majority, or at the very least those who hold the greatest amount of power.
  • As a result, the vast majority of research is concerned with the viewpoints and experiences of the dominant group, which is frequently not representative of other groups within a culture.
  • It was in the mid-1990s that co-cultural theory made its debut in the research field, serving as a framework to aid in the creation of a core set of concepts that could be used to categorize families of behavior and provide a voice to non-dominant people.
  • In this case, standpoint theory served as the foundation since it meant that the study would be based on real lived experiences, which, according to COLLINS (1990), allows for a focus on “privilege and punishment” among and among diverse groups of people.
  • Muted group theory was incorporated because it provides an explanation for the loss of voice and representation of a non-dominant group within a society.

Building on the previously mentioned theoretical concepts, ORBE (1998) developed co-cultural theory in order to aid in the identification of behavioral patterns that could explain the interactions and subsequent negotiations between “cultural differences” between non-dominant and dominant groups in the workplace.

According to ORBE, there are five fundamental concepts of co-cultural theory that should be considered:

  1. Every culture has a social hierarchy that gives certain groups more privileges than others. In most societies, groups with more privilege have a tendency to create the institutions that allow for communication to take place. The dominant group is responsible for defending and enforcing its position within society. Difficulties in advancement for non-dominant groups are caused by dominating communication mechanisms. Despite the fact that different marginalized groups come from a variety of different backgrounds, their positions in society are remarkably similar
  2. If co-cultural theories are to function within the confines of the dominant society, they must develop their own set of communication strategies.

There are five key elements that have an impact on the decision to pursue a particular strategy:

  1. For example, family, friends, social groupings, etc., are factors that impact and form an individual’s or group’s life experience and realities. The adaptive decisions made in response to a given event or set of circumstances are referred to as situational context. Capabilities are the physical and psychological aspects that determine a culture’s capacity to communicate
  2. They are often referred to as “ability factors.” Costs and benefits that are perceived: the advantages and drawbacks associated with various acts
  3. Aggressive, non-aggressive, and assertive communication approaches are examples of communication approaches used by individuals or groups while engaging in conversation. The activity that will result in the desired consequence is referred to as the preferred outcome. A person’s assimilation, separation, or accommodation are the three primary types of integration. Assimilation is the process of being integrated and removing any cultural disparities. In the context of culture, accommodation refers to efforts to foster and create collaborative strengths that help to retain both the dominant and non-dominant cultures. Separation refers to situations in which people make deliberate attempts to avoid developing any significant links with the dominant culture, and in many cases, with other co-cultural groups.
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It is possible to develop a matrix of multiple co-cultural communication strategies by combining the desired outcomes (assimilation, separation, and accommodation) with the communication methodologies, which results in the following descriptions of the various co-cultural communication strategies: Also, see: What are the most important aspects that influence cross-cultural interaction? How do various co-cultural communication tactics differ from one another? sources:

  • Collins, P. H., et al (1990). Black feminist ideas in the context of patriarchal dominance In Black feminist thinking: Knowledge, awareness, and the politics of empowerment, 138, 221-238
  • Orbe, M., “Black feminist thought,” 138, 221-238. (1998). Culture, power, and communication are discussed in detail in the course of constructing co-cultural theory. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, California.

Photograph courtesy of the Chattanooga School of Languages

What is co-culture ?

What is Cell Culture and how does it work? Generally speaking, cell culture refers to the process of growing cells under controlled circumstances, usually outside of their native habitat. Cells can thus be kept alive under precisely regulated settings for an extended period of time. What is Cell Co-Culture and how does it work? Cell Co-Culture is described as the co-existence of cellular growths of two or more distinct cell types that share liquid medium and growth factors in its most basic definition.

  • There are two forms of Co-Cultures: the first involves direct contact between different cell types, and the second involves indirect interaction between different cell types.
  • Almost every form of “transwell type” vessel used for indirect contact is vertically linked and has a similar construction (with poor design for proper experimentation).
  • It is generally recognized that cell to cell contact may result in cellular stimulation, the activation or deactivation of gene pathways, and/or the differentiation of cells, among other things.
  • Hormones, cytokines, exosomes, and other mediators of indirect effects are important actors.
  • For many years, the cell culture vessel with the insert immersed in the culture well was the standard method of culture.

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Co-cultural communication theory – Wikipedia

In what way does Cell Culture differ from other types of cultures? Generally speaking, cell culture is the process of growing cells in a controlled setting, usually outside of their native habitat. Cells can then be kept alive under precisely regulated circumstances for a period of time. What is Cell Co-Culture, and why is it important to know about it? Cell Cellular growths of two or more separate cell types that are growing together in the same liquid medium or with the same growth agents are referred to as co-cultures.

  • Generally speaking, Co-Cultures may be divided into two categories: those that occur as a result of direct contact between different cell types and those that occur as a result of indirect contact between different cell types.
  • Every sort of “transwell type” vessel for indirect contact is linked vertically and has a comparable structural design to one another (with poor design for proper experimentation).
  • Cell to cell contact has long been recognized to cause cellular stimulation, the activation or inactivation of gene pathways, and the differentiation of cells, among other effects.
  • Hormones, cytokines, exosomes, and other factors that have indirect effects are important.
  • For many years, the Cell culture vessel with the insert submerged in the culture well was the standard method of cell culture preparation.
  • In contrast to the conventional “transwell” style, our product ICCP is a fresh and revolutionary product technology!

Theory

What is Cell Culture, and how does it work? Generally speaking, cell culture is the process of growing cells under controlled circumstances, usually outside of their natural habitat. After that, cells may be kept alive under precisely regulated settings. What is Cell Co-Culture, and how does it work? Cell Co-Culture is described as the co-existence of cellular growths of two or more different cell types that share liquid medium and growth factors. Another description is to develop two types of cells or two types of tissues together in the same space.

  1. The term “transwell type” or “cell culture insert” refers to a co-cultivation container that is used for indirect contact (old style).
  2. What is the need for Co-Culture, and why is it important?
  3. In a similar vein, indirect contact (cell-to-cell communication) has been shown to have significant impacts (cellular stimulation, gene pathway activation/inactivation, and/or cellular differentiation).
  4. The Co-Culture technique was established in order to discover the impacts of cell-to-cell contacts as well as the elements/molecules that are involved.
  5. It is referred to as “transwell” style or “cell-culture insert” type when it is used to exchange culture fluids at the top (on the insert) and bottom (on the bottom dish) of a cell-cell interaction study.

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Application

Since the publication of “Laying the foundation for co-cultural communication theory: An inductive approach to studying “non-dominant” communication strategies and the factors that influence them” (1996), Orbe has published two books describing the theory and its application, as well as several studies on communication patterns and strategies based on different co-cultural groups. He presents an outline of co-cultural theory in his 1997 paper, “A Co-cultural Communication Approach to Intergroup Relations,” which includes an explanation of the process through which co-cultural group members strategically pick alternative communication styles.

The paper “From the standpoint(s) of traditionally muted groups: Explicating a co-cultural communication theoretical model” by Orbe (1998b) defined nine co-cultural orientations based on the intersections of three communication approaches: non-aggressive, assertive, and aggressive — with three preferred outcomes: separation, accommodation, and assimilation — and nine co-cultural orientations based on the intersections of three communication approaches: non-aggressive, assertive, and aggressive.

During the annual meeting of the Central States Communication Association in Detroit in 2000, Orbe and C.

Greer gave a paper titled “Recognizing the Diversity of Lived Experience: The Utility of Co-Cultural Theory in Communication and Disabilities Research.” A presentation on “Multiracial/ethnic identity: A co-cultural approach” was given by Heuman in 2001 at the annual meeting of the Central States Communication Association, which was held in Cincinnati.

  1. In 2004, Orbe utilized co-cultural theory as a basis to investigate the methods through which public discussion might be promoted across cultural borders.
  2. In this book chapter, Orbe and Spellers (2005) discuss the roots of co-cultural theory from the viewpoints of their respective fields of study, as well as the implications of their findings for future research.
  3. The scales’ construct validity and reliability were examined in two investigations, which were published in the journal Co-Cultural Theory (C-CTS).
  4. Two writers used Orbe’s (1998) co-cultural theory model, which consists of nine communication orientations and twenty-six communication practices, to determine how members of co-cultural groups respond to acts of prejudice in their communities.

The tales of the participants were coded by two authors using qualitative content analysis. The study also provided a framework for future research initiatives. The following are the 26 communication practices:

Practice Brief Description
Averting Controversy Keeping the conversation away from potentially dangerous or controversial subject areas
Extensive Preparation Preparing extensively on matters of controversial topics before interacting with dominant group members
Overcompensating Avoiding discrimination by overt attempts to become a “superstar”
Manipulating Stereotypes Conforming to common stereotypes in order to exploit the dominant group members for personal gain
Bargaining Arranging a deal with dominant group members in which both parties agree to ignore co-cultural differences
Dissociating Avoiding stereotypes within one’s co-cultural group
Mirroring Behaving like a dominant group member to make one’s co-cultural identity hidden
Strategic Distancing Avoiding co-cultural group members to be perceived as an individual
Ridiculing self Participating in communication that is demeaning to other co-cultural group members
Increasing visibility Covertly maintaining co-cultural presence within a dominant structure
Dispelling stereotypes Challenging stereotypes by being one’s self
Communicating self Interacting with dominant group members authentically
Intragroup Networking Working with co-cultural group members who share philosophies, convictions and goals
Utilizing Liaisons Working with dominant group members who can be trusted for support, guidance and assistance
Educating Others Educating dominant group members of co-cultural norms and values
Confronting Using aggressive methods including ones that may violate the rights of others, to assert one’s voice
Gaining Advantage Talking about co-cultural oppression to provoke dominant group members
Avoiding Avoiding dominant group members, especially certain activities or locations where an interaction is likely
Maintaining Barriers Using verbal and nonverbal cues to impose a distance from dominant group members
Exemplifying Strengths Promoting past accomplishments to society of co-cultural group members
Embracing Stereotypes Applying co-cultural stereotypes to dominant group members in a positive way
Attacking Personally attacking dominant group members’ self-concept
Sabotaging others Taking the ability of dominant group members to fully embrace their privilege inherent in dominant structures
Emphasizing Commonalities Finding common ground with dominant group members while downplaying or ignoring differences
Developing Positive Face Being polite, considerate and attentive to dominant group members
Censoring Self Saying nothing when dominant group members say offensive or inappropriate things about co-cultural group members

Jungmi Jun, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina’s School of Journalism and Mass Communications, released an essay in 2012 based on her research “Why are Asian Americans so deafeningly quiet? Negotiation Strategies of Asian Americans in the Face of Communicative Discrimination “a paper published in the Journal of Intercultural and International Communication. The paradigm of co-cultural theory developed by Orbe was used to investigate two problems by the author. One is what kinds of racially discriminatory messages are targeted at Asian Americans, and another is what kinds of communicative approaches are used by Asian Americans to negotiate those messages with those who are not Asian Americans.

According to the findings of the study, Asian Americans are more likely than other groups to use nonaggressive responses to racially discriminatory messages as a result of internal and external factors such as emotional shock and humiliation, a lack of knowledge about appropriate responses, peer pressure, and strategic intent.

Notes

  1. A First Look at Communication Theory (Mark Orbe on Co-Cultural Theory, Part 1), retrieved 2019-02-06
  2. A First Look at Communication Theory (Mark Orbe on Co-Cultural Theory, Part 1) (retrieved 2019-02-06)
  3. A First Look at Communication Theory (Mark Orbe on Co-Cultural Theory) (retrieved 2019

References

  • Ardener, E., and Ardener, E. (1978). There are a few remaining issues in the analysis of events. Pages 103–121 in G. Schwinner’s (Ed.) The yearbook of symbolic anthropology, edited by G. Schwinner Hurst & Ardener, S. (London: Hurst & Ardener, S.) (1975). Women’s Perceptions. Malaby Press, London
  • Camara, S. K., and Orbe, M. P. Camara, S. K., and Orbe, M. P. (2010). A co-cultural communication inquiry into the analysis of strategic reactions to discriminatory behaviors was conducted. Dixon, L. D., Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 3(2), 83–113
  • Dixon, L. D., Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 3(2), 83–113
  • Dixon, L. D., Dixon, L. D., Dixon, L. D., Dixon, L. D., Dixon, L. D., Dixon, L. D., Dixon, L. D., Dixon, L. D., Dixon, L. D., Dixon, L. (2001). Co-cultural theory by Mark Orbe makes significant contributions to the field of intercultural communication study in terms of naming concerns. Heuman, A., gave a paper at the Central States Communication Association’s annual meeting in Cincinnati
  • Heuman, A., et al (2001). A co-cultural method to understanding multiracial/ethnic identity. Presentation at the Central States Communication Association’s annual conference in Cincinnati
  • Jun, J. Paper delivered at the Central States Communication Association’s annual meeting
  • (2012). Why are Asian Americans deafeningly quiet? Negotiation methods employed by Asian Americans in the face of communicative prejudice. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, doi: 10.1080/17513057.2012.720700
  • Kramarae, C. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, doi: 10.1080/17513057.2012.720700
  • (1981). Women and Men Have Their Say. Newberry House, Rowley, Massachusetts
  • Lapinski, M. K., and Orbe, M. (2007). It has been demonstrated that the Co-Cultural Theory Scales have construct validity and reliability. Communication Methods and Measure, 1(2), 137–164
  • Orbe, M. Communication Methods and Measure, 1(2), 137–164 (1996). An inductive approach to researching “non-dominant” communication methods and the factors that impact them serves as the foundation for co-cultural communication theory. Communication Studies, 47(3), 157–176
  • Orbe, M. Communication Studies, 47(3), 157–176
  • (1997). Intergroup relations are approached via the lens of co-cultural dialogue. Journal of Intergroup Relations, 24, 36–49
  • Orbe, M. Journal of Intergroup Relations, 24, 36–49
  • (1998a). Culture, power, and communication are discussed in detail in the course of constructing co-cultural theory. Sage Publications
  • Orbe, M. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications (1998b). From the perspective(s) of traditionally marginalized groups: Explanation of a theoretical model of co-cultural dialogue in context. Communication Theory, 8, 1–26
  • Orbe, M., and Greer, C. M. Communication Theory, 8, 1–26
  • (2000). Recognition of the diversity of lived experience: The use of co-cultural theory in communication and disability research M. Orbe gave a paper at the annual conference of the Central States Communication Association in Detroit
  • The paper was written by M. Orbe (2004). A case study of the 2000-2002 community-based civil rights health initiative demonstrates the use of co-cultural theory and the spirit of dialogue. In G. M. Chen and J. Starosta (Eds. ), Dialogue Among Diversities (pp. 191–211), there is a dialogue among diversities. National Communication Association
  • Orbe, M., and Spellers, R. E., eds. Washington, DC: National Communication Association (2005). From the peripheries to the heart: using co-cultural theory in a variety of settings. Intercultural communication theory and research, edited by Wbgaudykunst, pp 173–191, New York: Springer-Verlag. Sage Publications
  • Ramirez-Sanchez, R. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage
  • Ramirez-Sanchez, R. (2008). Embracing Marginalization from Within: Extending Co-Cultural Theory Through the Experience of Afro Punk Howard Journal of Communication, Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 89–104
  • Smith, D. E., Howard Journal of Communication, Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 89–104 (1987). “The everyday world as problematic: a feminist sociology of knowledge,” a feminist sociology of knowledge. Northeastern University Press
  • Stanback, M. H., and Pearce, W. B. Boston: Northeastern University Press
  • (1981). Members of “subordinate” social groupings employ a variety of communication styles while conversing with “the man.” Quarterly Journal of Speech, vol. 67, no. 21, pp. 21–30
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External links

  • Western Michigan University School of Communication
  • Central States Communication Association
  • Western Michigan University School of Communication

CO CULTURAL SPEECH – STACIA SWAN – COMMUNICATION

You will work in small groups to research, produce, and deliver a presentation that will inform us about a certain co-culture. Recall that a co-culture is a subgroup to which one can belong (based on religion, gender, age, physical abilities, country of origin, sexual orientation, and so on) while still remaining within the larger US culture framework. Our participation in diverse co-cultures has a significant impact on our sense of self and communication style. Some co-cultures we choose to be a member of, while others we are destined to be a part of.

I.Subject: The group will apply principles learned in class and from the text to a co-cultural group of interest.

Concepts that may be considered include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • You will work in small groups to research, develop, and give a presentation that will inform us about a certain co-culture. Recall that a co-culture is a subset to which one can belong (based on religion, gender, age, physical ability, place of origin, sexual orientation, and so on) while still living within our broader US culture as defined above. Members of different co-cultures have a significant impact on our sense of self and communication style. Others we are born into, and others we choose to be a part of by our choices in co-culture. Jews, Deaf Americans, African-Americans, older citizens, homosexuals and lesbians, and even gang involvement are all instances of co-cultural groups in the United States. First, the group will apply themes learned in class and from the literature to a co-cultural group that they are interested in learning more about. While these notions should not represent preconceptions, they should be consistent communication patterns or ideals discovered via study instead. Concepts that may be considered include, but are not limited to, those following:
  1. Follow the fundamental speech structure of an introduction, body, and conclusion. a typed, formal outline that details your group’s findings and maps out the presentation–only ONE group outline and ONE group reference page are required for this presentation
  2. Make careful to support all of your statements with research and to reference your sources throughout the presentation. Include a reference page with the research sources, as well as an outline of the research. In each case, utilize a minimum of two sources per individual (from a mix of sources such as books, papers, interviews, and websites–don’t rely just on the internet)
  3. Use your imagination! Make extensive use of audiovisual aids and consider ways to interact with the audience (for example, by playing a game, leading a group activity, or asking questions)
  4. Plan on presenting for around half of the class period–about 30 minutes
  5. And Distribute speaking duties equitably throughout the group–all members must speak! Your group can participate in any type of co-culture activity, but here are a few suggestions: Students that do not fit within the traditional college setting African-Americans are a diverse group of people. Culture of the Deaf Juggalos Trekkies are a group of people who like to go on adventures. Comic Con is a convention that takes place every year in San Diego. Jews in the United States Muslims Mormans Whether you’re gay, lesbian, or transgendered, we’ve got you covered. Farm Laborers from the Amish Buddhists Veterans of World War II Gang members, including members of the Oriental Troop, the Mexican Mafia, and the Italian Mafia Goth Culture is a subculture of the Gothic movement. Bikers (either Hell’s Angels or other similar groups) Native Americans are a group of people who live in the United States (or a specific tribe) Armenian Traditions and Culture Greek Orthodox Canadian-Americans are a diverse group. Hippie Culture is a way of life for many people. Hip Hop is a style of music that is popular nowadays. Star Wars is a fictional universe created by George Lucas and produced by Lucasfilm Ltd. Alcoholics Video Gaming is a popular pastime. Hipsters with physical disabilities in the 1940s Punk Culture is a subculture of the punk rock movement. Asian Americans are a diverse group of people. Hmong Way of Life Yakuza Otaku is a Japanese term for a person who enjoys video games (Japanese Anime) Polynesian Culture is a way of life. Italian-Americans are a diverse group of people who come from a variety of backgrounds. Portuguese-speaking people in the United States

What is a co cultural group? – Kitchen

Follow the fundamental speech structure: an introduction, a body, and an end. Obtain and submit a written, formal outline that summarizes your group’s results and lays out the presentation–there is only ONE group outline and ONE group reference page required for this presentation. Make careful to back up all of your statements with research and to reference your sources throughout the presenting process. Together with the outline, include a reference page with these research sources as well. In each case, use a minimum of two sources per person (from a variety of sources such as books, articles, interviews, and websites–do not rely solely on the internet); Think outside of the box.

  1. Members must take turns speaking; no one is exempt from this rule.
  2. Students who do not attend traditional colleges American Indians and Alaska Natives are also included.
  3. Juggalos Trekkies are a group of people that are interested in space exploration.
  4. Jewish Americans are a diverse group of people who have a variety of backgrounds and beliefs.
  5. Laborers on Amish Farms Buddhists Those who fought in the war Asian Troops, Mexican Mafia, and Italian Mafia are among the gangs involved.
  6. Native Americans are a group of people that live in North and Central America (or a specific tribe) Cultural Traditions of Armenia Greek Orthodox People from Canada who live in the United States Pop Culture in the 1960s and 1970s Hip Hop is a genre of music that is popular nowadays.
  7. Alcoholics Gaming on the computer Hipsters who were physically challenged in the 1940s Cult of the Punk (also known as Punk Culture) is a subculture of the punk rock movement.

Cult of the Hmong Yakuza Otaku is a Japanese term for a person who enjoys manga and anime (Japanese Anime) Cultural Traditions of the Polynesians Italian-Americans are a diverse group of people who come from a variety of backgrounds and ethnic backgrounds. American citizens of Portuguese descent

What are examples of co cultures?

The following are some instances of co-cultures: Jews in the United States, Deaf people in the United States; African- Americans; elderly citizens; homosexuals and lesbians; and gang involvement. High versus low context, human nature, noncontact versus contact culture, and so forth.

What is meant by a co-culture?

Pay attention to the pronunciation. (koh-KUL-cher) When two or more different types of cells are grown together, the result is called a hybrid cell culture.

What is an example of a cultural group?

Groups of people from a variety of cultures The term “people” refers to a plurality of individuals who are treated as a whole, such as an ethnic group or nation. As an example, the current Frisians and Danes are two closely related Germanic peoples, although numerous Middle Eastern ethnic groups are frequently classified as the Semitic people based on their linguistic affiliation.

What is the difference between culture and co-culture?

Culture and co-culture—Culture is made up of language, values, beliefs, traditions, and practices that are passed down and learnt from generation to generation. Co-culture is defined as the perception of belonging to a group that is a part of a larger cultural context.

What are 5 examples of culture?

The examples that follow are meant to serve as illustrations of traditional culture.

  • Norms. Norms are informal, unwritten laws that regulate social conduct. Languages
  • Festivals
  • And rituals are examples of norms in action. Ceremony
  • sHolidays
  • sPastimes
  • sFood
  • sArchitecture
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Which of the following is a characteristic of a co-culture?

Norms. Normalcy refers to informal, unwritten laws that regulate social conduct. Languages, festivals, and rituals are examples of norms that exist today. Ceremony;sHolidays;sPastimes;sFood;sArchitecture;

Why are co-cultures important?

Norms. Norms are informal, unwritten regulations that regulate social conduct. Languages; festivals; and rituals are examples of norms that exist. Ceremony;sHolidays;sPastimes;sFood;sArchitecture;

Is gender a co-culture?

Gender is a co-cultural category because men and women have various cultural identities based on biological and socialization differences. Men and women have diverse cultural identities.

Why is it important to study about co-cultures?

Every culture has a social hierarchy that gives certain groups more privileges than others. Despite the fact that various disadvantaged groups come from a variety of different origins, their positions in society are quite similar. If co-cultural theories are to function within the limits of the dominant society, they must establish their own distinctive communication tactics.

Is Filipino a cultural group?

Learning about an Ethnic Group in the Philippines: Their Culture and Traditions. Filipinos are indigenous to the pacific islands, therefore it should come as no surprise that the country is home to a diverse range of ethnic groups that influence the country’s culture and customs.

What are the cultural groups in USA?

When it comes to race and ethnicity, the United States is a varied country. Six races are legally recognized: white, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, black or African American, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander, and individuals of two or more races. White is the most common race, followed by American Indian and Alaska Native and Asian.

What characteristics make up a cultural group?

When it comes to race and ethnicity, the United States is a varied place.

In the United States, six races are recognized: white, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, black or African American, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander, and those who are a mix of more than one race.

What do co cultures in today’s society include?

Ethnicity and color, gender identity and sexual orientation, age/generation, and socioeconomic class are just a few of the co-cultures that exist. The codes that members of a culture employ are frequently the most recognizable factors that shape communication between people from various cultural backgrounds and are therefore important to understand.

Why is co cultural theory important?

It is possible to comprehend how historically underrepresented group members interact within social systems dominated by cultural groups that have, through time, gained dominant group status through the use of a co-cultural theoretical approach.

How do co cultures affect language?

-Co-cultures might be characterized by activities, beliefs, or qualities that are shared by a group of people. People who live in high-context societies are educated to communicate meaning through nuanced behaviors and contextual indicators rather than through direct spoken communication. Distance with little power. People from different cultures think that no single individual or organization should have undue authority.

6.1: What is Culture?

Learning Outcomes are the results of your learning.

  1. Give an explanation of the term “culture” as it is used in this work. Recognize a prevailing cultural tradition
  2. Recognize the distinction between a co-culture and a microculture

Give an example of how the term “culture” is employed in this work. Acquire knowledge about a dominating culture Recognize the difference between a co-culture and a microculture

  • According to the Akamba tribe of Kenya, the first two individuals were brought down to earth by God on a cloud. People were created out of the blood and clay of We-ila, an ancient god who lived in ancient Babylon and Sumeria
  • The gods slew We-ila and then constructed humans out of his blood and clay. One popular belief among Tibetans is that they trace their existence to the mating of an ogress from another realm and a monkey on Gangpo Ri Mountain in Tsetang, which occurred thousands of years ago. And the Aboriginal tribes of Australia believe that people are just decedents of gods, a belief that is shared by many other cultures. 5

In the end, the origin myth we were taught as children was a function of the culture in which we were brought up. These many myths result in vastly diverse perspectives on an individual’s relationship with the universe as well as with their God, gods, or goddesses, depending on the narrative. Fourth, our beliefs, values, norms, and rules will be taught to us by the culture in which we are raised. When it comes to the truth or existence of something, beliefs are assumptions and convictions held by an individual, group, or culture about that truth or existence.

  1. Following that, we have values, which are essential and long-lasting beliefs or standards that a culture holds regarding desirable and proper courses of action or results.
  2. When considering this term, it’s crucial to note that different cultures have varying perspectives on both the path of action and the outcome of a given situation.
  3. Therefore, placing one’s self in harm’s path (course of action) or dying as a result of one’s actions would be regarded as both desirable and suitable in such civilizations.
  4. In reality, many religious books view martyrdom as a sacred vocation that must be carried out by the faithful.
  5. Following that, the notions of norms and regulations are included in the definition of culture.
  6. A rule is an explicit set of guidelines (usually written down) that governs acceptable or proper social behavior within a particular culture.
  7. The majority of the time, we are unaware of the existence of a cultural standard unless we violate it ourselves or see someone else breaking the norm.

The third aspect of the definition of culture, and perhaps the most essential for our purposes in terms of interpersonal communication, is that these beliefs, values, norms, and standards will regulate how individuals behave in their interactions with one another.

Co-cultures

In addition to a dominant culture, most civilizations include a variety of co-cultures, which include geographical, economic, social, religious, ethnic, and other cultural groups that have an impact on the overall culture of the society. People that have certain views, philosophies, or life experiences come together to form co-cultures, which can be rather diverse. Among the many varied cultures that exist in the United States are Amish culture, African American culture, Buddhist culture, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA+) culture, to name just a few examples.

  • This is especially true when dealing with a large number of cultural groupings.
  • When it comes to the LGBTQIA culture, the individuals who make up the various letters might have a wide range of cultural experiences that are distinct from one another within the greater coculture.
  • Co-cultures contribute to a broader culture by bringing their own sense of history and purpose to the table.
  • For example, Cinco de Mayo is a major co-cultural festival in the United States that is observed on the fifth of May.
  • This, on the other hand, is not a Mexican holiday.
  • Numerous individuals of the United States make the mistake of supposing that Cinco de Mayo is Mexico’s Independence Day, when it is not.
  • Unfortunately, Cinco de Mayohas evolved into more of an American festival than it has been a Mexican holiday.
  • Just so you know (also referred to as the Battle of Puebla Day).
  • The meaning linked with the co-culture is frequently distorted or ignored throughout this process.

Think of St. Patrick’s Day, which developed from a religious holiday commemorating the death of St. Patrick on March 17, 461 CE to a day when “everyone’s Irish” and drinks green beer, if you need another illustration.

Microcultures

In addition to a dominant culture, most societies include a variety of co-cultures, which include geographical, economic, social, religious, ethnic, and other cultural groups that have an impact on the overall culture of the community. People that have certain views, philosophies, or life experiences come together to form co-cultures, which may be quite powerful. For example, in the United States, we often refer to a broad number of various cultures, including Amish culture, African American culture, Buddhist culture, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA+) culture.

This is especially true when dealing with a large variety of cultural groups.

It is possible for individuals of the LGBTQIA culture to have a wide range of cultural experiences that are distinct from one another within the wider coculture in which they are immersed.

As part of a larger culture, co-cultures bring with them their own sense of history and mission.

A popular co-cultural holiday celebrated in the United States is Cinco de Mayo, which is celebrated on the 5th of May every year.

This, on the other hand, is not a holiday in Mexico.

Numerous inhabitants of the United States make the mistake of presuming that Cinco de Mayo is Mexico’s Independence Day, which is not true.

Unfortunately, Cinco de Mayohas evolved into more of an American festival than it has became a Mexican holiday in the past several decades.

We use this example because the bigger culture frequently coopts elements of a co-culture and attempts to incorporate them into the mainstream.

In case you’re looking for another example, consider St. Patrick’s Day, which evolved from a religious celebration commemorating the death of St. Patrick on March 17, 461 CE to a day when “everyone is Irish” and drinks green beer.

  • A variety of meanings for the term culture have emerged over the years. As a result, limiting “culture” to a single meaning is difficult, regardless of how you define the word “culture.” Our definition of culture is a collection of individuals who, through a process of learning, may share views of the world, which in turn impacts their beliefs, values, standards, and regulations, which in turn influence their actions. We describe culture as follows: In the field of cultural studies, we will be discussing three different concepts that are culturally connected. In the first place, we have a dominant culture, which is defined as a specific society’s established language, religion, behavior, values, rituals, and social customs, all of which are based on that society’s established culture. There will be a plethora of co-cultures and microcultures existing within the main culture. A co-culture is a collection of geographical, economic, social, religious, ethnic, or other cultural groups that have a significant impact on the society in which they live. Finally, we have microcultures, which are cultural patterns of behavior that are impacted by cultural ideas, values, conventions, and standards that are particular to a given location or inside an institution.
  • Consider your own dominating culture for a moment. What does it mean to be a part of your country’s culture mean to you? How well-established is your society’s language, religion, social behavior, values, rituals, and social customs
  • What is the dominant language, religion, social behavior, and values
  • List five co-cultural groups to which you now belong and explain why you are a member of each group. What role does each of these distinct co-cultural groups have in determining your identity as a person? Many organizations are well-known for creating, or attempting to create, microcultures that are highly specific to their mission. Think about your institution or university and how you would describe your microculture to someone who is unfamiliar with your culture.

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