In Which Of The Following Present-day Areas Was The Folsom Culture Found

In which of the following present-day areas was paleo-indian folsom culture found?

Which of the following modern-day regions has evidence of paleo-indian folsom civilization been discovered? northwestern United Statesa. the Pacific Northwestb. Northern Canada c. the southern states of Mexico d. the vast expanse of the Great Plains

Answers

D) The excellent plans have been put to the test! For the most part in North America, land grants were a quarter section, or 160 acres, in size. As a result, this appeared to be a fantastic opportunity for immigrants, the majority of whom could only dream of owning land back home. The “Great Plains” were the present-day locations in which the Paleo-Indian Folsom civilization was created, however it should be emphasized that this was not the only place where the culture was established. When posed the question stated above, the correct response is “a.

The Pacific Northwest is the name given to the modern-day region where the Paleo-Indian Folsom civilisation was discovered.

  1. The correct response is option D.
  2. Explanation: The Folsom culture is an early prehistoric civilisation of the Paleo-Indian period in North America that dates back to the Paleo-Indian period.
  3. The Folsom culture, which existed between 8800 and 8200 BC and followed the earlier Clovis civilisation, is dated to 8800–8200 BC.
  4. Tees were also employed as blades, as scrapers, as needles, and as awls, among other things.
  5. In North America, a variety of Paleo-Indian cultures flourished, with some confined to the modern-day United States and Canada’s Great Plains and Great Lakes regions, as well as nearby territories to the west and southwest.
  6. The Paleo-Indian Folsom Culture may be found on the Great Plains, and it dates back thousands of years.

In which of the following present-day areas was the Folsom culture found?

What is the number of syllables in the term. 11:23:50 p.m. on January 25, 2022 | 15 Responses Whenever the ratio of supervisors to subordinates surpasses the tolerable span of Weegy: When the supervisor-to-subordinate ratio surpasses the workable span of control, extra Teams, Divisions, or other organizational structures are created. 1:11:58 p.m. on January 27, 2022 | 14 Responses “All the earth is a stage, the men,” William Shakespeare famously observed of the globe. 1:30:50:57 a.m. on January 31, 2002 |

  • Weegy: Glaciers are responsible for storing over 70% of all the fresh water on the planet.
  • 1/30/2022 2:44:40 A.M.|
  • Weegy: Please limit your questions to one per minute.
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  • 1:57:21 PM on February 1, 2022 |
  • For starters, he couldn’t stand the cold of Alaska after spending his entire life in the heat of Texas.
  • 5:25:42 a.m.

9 responses Questions 1-10: Fill in the blanks with an antonym for the word in question.

He’s been accused of stealing, but we don’t believe it.

Weegy: Glaciers are responsible for storing over 70% of all the fresh water on the planet.

1/25/2022 1:22:35 A.M.|

Weegy: The Brainstorming stage of the writing process is concerned with the generation of ideas.

7 Responses to The following elements have the most effect on a child’s temperament: The.

2/2/2022 2:16:28 a.m.|

Weegy: Oxides are distinguished from other minerals that contain oxygen atoms in that they exhibit the following properties: In oxides, the oxygen atoms form direct bonds with one another. 1/26/2022 1:18:05 A.M.| 6 Responses to

In which of the following present-day areas was Paleo-Indian Folsom culture found?

In the word, count the number of syllables it has. 5:23:50 p.m. on January 25, 2022 a total of 15 responses Whenever the ratio of supervisors to subordinates reaches a tolerable range of Weegy: When the supervisor-to-subordinate ratio surpasses a workable span of control, extra Teams, Divisions, and/or Departments are created to help handle the situation. 1:11:58 p.m. on February 7, 2022 a total of 14 replies “All the world is a theatre, the men,” William Shakespeare famously observed. 12:50:57 a.m.

  1. 10 Answers_ The oceans hold around 70% of all the fresh water on the planet.
  2. It is especially frequent in flat, barren places where there is little vegetation.
  3. Weegy: Please limit your questions to one per person.
  4. Which of the following nations does not have a river named the Mekong?
  5. on February 1, 2022 There are nine possible responses.
  6. 5:25:42 a.m., January 27, 2022|
  7. 1/29/2022 8:54:34 AM|

According to Weegy, glaciers hold close to 70 percent of the world’s fresh water.

Answers to questions posted on 1/25/2022 1:22:35 AM Ideas for new writing projects are generated at the stage of the writing process.

Among the tasks associated with this phase are the following: |

7 responses The following elements have the most impact on a child’s temperament: The.

2/2/2022 6 responses at 2:16:28 a.m.

In comparison to other minerals that include oxygen atoms, oxides are distinguished by the following characteristics: The oxygen atoms form direct bonds in oxides.

1/18/2022, 1:18:05 a.m.|

Early Inhabitants of the Americas

Civilization in America originated during the last Ice Age, when nomadic Paleo-Indians crossed the Bering Strait and settled in the Americas.

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Learning Objectives

Description of prehistoric Americans and environmental changes that allowed them to migrate to other parts of the world

Key Takeaways

  • Description of prehistoric Americans and environmental changes that allowed them to migrate to other lands in the Americas

Key Terms

  • Nomadic: living a nomadic lifestyle with no fixed residence
  • Peripatetic, itinerant
  • A wanderer. In comparative linguistics, the study of the languages of several tribes is undertaken. In the last glacial epoch, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was the period in Earth’s climatic history during which the ice sheets were at their largest extent. Beringia: The Bering land bridge was a land bridge that connected present-day Alaska and eastern Siberia at various points during the Pleistocene Ice Age, measuring approximately 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) broad (from north to south) at its maximum extent.

Humans have been living in North America for thousands of years before the first European set foot on the land. The birth of civilization in America happened during the last Ice Age, when the nomadic, ancient peoples of the Americas—the Paleo-Indians—migrated into what is now the continental United States and Canada from their original homelands in Asia. A great deal of scholarly debate surrounds their actual origins, as well as the path and chronology of their migrations throughout the continent.

The Land Bridge and Migrations

While some experts may disagree on the “why” and “when” of migratory patterns, everyone may agree that migration would have been impossible if the Earth had not gone through a glacial period. In Earth’s climatic history, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), which occurred between about 18,000 and 20,000 years ago, was the most recent epoch in which ice sheets reached their maximum extent. Extremely cold weather led in the creation of enormous ice sheets across the Earth’s most northern and southern latitudes due to the accumulation of water vapor.

  • It has been thousands of years since the seafloors of numerous interglacial shallow seas have been revealed, including the Bering Strait, the Chukchi Sea to the north, and the Bering Sea to the south, which were all exposed for thousands of years.
  • This group had been separated from its progenitor groups in Asia for at least 5,000 years before spreading to the Americas sometime after 16,500 years ago, according to archaeological evidence.
  • The classic view holds that these early migrants crossed the Beringia land bridge, which connects eastern Siberia and present-day Alaska, between 11,000 and 25,000 years ago, depending on who you ask.
  • When it came to validating or rejecting established ideas, such as the Clovis First / Single Origin Hypothesis, scholars looked to well-known techniques in the 2000s to do so.
  • The Paleo-Indians are thought to have followed herds of now-extinct Pleistocene megafauna along ice-free corridors that spanned between the Laurentide and Cordilleran ice sheets, where they were able to see and photograph them.

Some genetic research suggests that subsequent waves of migration happened after the initial Paleo-Indian settlement, but before the current expansions of the Inuit, Inupiat, and Yupik peoples in northern Canada and Alaska.

The First American Civilizations

It took many thousand years after several waves of migrations for the first complex civilizations to emerge on the continent. The Clovis culture was one of the earliest known civilizations, with archaeological sites reaching back around 13,000 years. In North America and portions of South America, the Clovis culture permeated most of the landscape. It is unclear if the Clovis people were a single united tribe or if they were a collection of tribes linked together by a shared technology and religious beliefs.

  1. In North America, it is believed that Paleo-Indian adaptation was characterized by tiny, highly mobile bands consisting of around 20 to 50 members of an extended family traveling in small groups.
  2. Following their arrival in the United States, many of these initial immigrants established permanent residences.
  3. The climate of North America stabilized circa 8000 BCE, resulting in a climate that we are familiar with today.
  4. In certain cases, ancient societies generated cutting-edge technology that spurred the growth of cities and even empires.

Early Lifestyles

In order to survive, Paleo-Indians lived in tiny, mobile parties of large game hunters that traveled light and frequently in order to discover new food sources.

Learning Objectives

Describe how the early settlers in the Americas adapted to the changing environment.

Key Takeaways

  • The Paleo-Indians carried extremely effective fluted-style spear points, as well as microblades for butchering and hide-processing, which they employed in their hunting and gathering activities. It would take thousands of years for the Paleo-Indian to spread throughout the Americas, resulting in regional variances in lifestyle but maintaining a similar type of stone tool manufacturing. Since megafauna went extinct as a result of climate change and the extinction of megafauna, Paleo-Indians have been compelled to utilize a mixed foraging strategy that includes smaller terrestrial game, aquatic creatures, and a range of plants. Environmental changes and successive waves of migration resulted in the emergence of unique cultures, such as the Clovis culture, which is still in existence today.

Key Terms

  • Massive herds of animals from a particular place or historical period are referred to as megafauna. Paleo-Indian: A classification term used to refer to the first peoples who inhabited the Americas during the final glacial episodes of the late Pleistocene period
  • Flora: A collection of plants considered as a whole, particularly those from a particular country, region, time, or place
  • Paleo-Indian: A classification term used to refer to the first peoples who inhabited the Americas during the final glacial episodes of the late Pleistocene period
  • Clovis culture is a Paleo-Indian civilization called after unique stone tools discovered in Clovis, New Mexico, in the 1920s and 1930s
  • It is a subset of the Clovis culture.
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Paleo-Indian Migration

Paleo-Indians, also known as Paleo-Americans, were the earliest peoples to arrive on and eventually settle on the continent of North and South America. Paleo-Indian migratory patterns to and throughout the Americas, including the precise times and routes used, are still being researched and debated today, according to experts. According to conventional wisdom, these early migrants crossed the Beringia land bridge, which connects eastern Siberia and present-day Alaska, around 40,000–17,000 years ago, when sea levels were significantly reduced by the Quaternary glaciation, and settled in the region that is now known as Alaska.

  1. Early evidence of Paleo-Indians has been discovered in Alaska (East Beringia), followed by archaeological sites in northern British Columbia, western Alberta, and the Old Crow Flats region of the Yukon, all of which are considered to be among the most important in the world.
  2. All of the various groups, on the other hand, had a common technique of stone tool manufacturing, which allowed knapping styles and advancement to be distinguished.
  3. In addition to great game hunting, these families would subsist on nuts, berries, fish, birds, and other aquatic mammals during the summer months, but during the winter, coastal fishing parties would go interior to hunt and trap fresh food and furs for the winter months.
  4. As favored resources were depleted and new supplies were sought, groups were forced to relocate from one location to another.
  5. Family groups relocated every 3–6 days, traveling up to 360 km (220 mi) in a year, according to some estimates.
  6. A variety of animal hides were utilized to make clothing and shelters, and these hides were also used to make weapons.

The huge beaver, steppe wisent, musk ox, mastodon, woolly mammoth, and ancient reindeer were among the large Pleistocene creatures that existed (early caribou).

Clovis Culture

They were the earliest peoples to arrive on and eventually settle on the American continent, known as Paleo-Indians or Paleo-Americans. Paleo-Indian migration to and across the Americas, including the precise times and routes used, is still being researched and debated today. According to conventional wisdom, these early migrants crossed the Beringia land bridge, which connects eastern Siberia and present-day Alaska, around 40,000–17,000 years ago, when sea levels were significantly reduced by the Quaternary glaciation, and settled in the area that is now known as Alaska.

  • Ancient Paleo-Indian sites have been discovered in Alaska (East Beringia), followed by archaeological sites in northern British Columbia, western Alberta, and the Old Crow Flats region of the Yukon, which all include evidence of Paleo-Indians.
  • Although each each group had its own form of stone tool manufacture, the styles and progression of each group could be distinguished.
  • Additionally, these families would subsist on a diet of nuts, berries, fish, birds, and other aquatic mammals in addition to large game hunting.
  • Plant communities and animal populations eventually changed as a result of climate changes during the late Ice Age.
  • Hunting and gathering were the primary modes of subsistence for small bands during the spring and summer months, and then smaller direct family groupings for the fall and winter months.
  • Because of successful hunting, diets were frequently filling and high in protein.
  • The hunt for extinct megafauna is assumed to have been the primary means of subsistence for inland tribes for much of the Early and Middle Paleo-Indian eras.

Conclusion

Around 17,500 to 14,500 years ago, glaciers that covered much of the northern half of the continent began to gradually melt, exposing fresh territory that might be occupied for the first time. At the same time as this was happening, extinctions among great animals began to occur all across the planet. The species of camel and horse died out in North America, with the latter species disappearing from the continent until it was reintroduced by the Spaniards in 15th century CE, when the animal was reintroduced by the Spanish.

This alteration in the environment would not only disrupt hunting and migratory patterns, but it would also pave the way for the development of a varied range of civilizations throughout the Americas.

Paleo-Indian Hunters: The Lithic peoples, sometimes known as Paleo-Indians, were nomadic hunter-gatherers who lived in what is now the United States. They are the first known humans to have lived in the Americas.

Paleo-Indians

These two archaeological sites gave the first irrefutable proof that ancient Americans had coexisted with and hunted the Pleistocene animals, a prospect that had previously been dismissed by the majority of academics and researchers. Later discoveries, on the other hand, called into question the popular idea that the Clovis people were the earliest Americans. Over the course of several decades, researchers largely believed that the Clovis people originally lived in the central plains of North America before expanding their reach to the rest of the world.

  1. These people skirted the coastlines and tropical woods on their way to the southern point of South America about 10,000 years ago, when the Ice Age was coming to a close.
  2. However, the discovery of additional sites in the late twentieth century, together with fresh evidence from existing sites, has called into question the idea.
  3. Many well-documented sites south of the United States border are as old or older than the Clovis peoples’ sites in northern Mexico and southern Arizona.
  4. Furthermore, the new data indicated that the earliest Americans established themselves in a variety of diverse places.
  5. As a result, Clovis was simply one of numerous regional cultures that existed at the time.
  6. The Nenana civilization, named after the Nenana Valley in central Alaska, was characterized by the usage of triangular and teardrop-shaped spear points and a subsistence lifestyle based on hunting and gathering.
  7. The Nenana civilization was closely tied to hunting and gathering societies in eastern Siberia, and it was influenced by these cultures.
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It was utilized as an observation point for seeing animals since it was situated on a hill above the Arctic Circle.

Instead, they are very similar to Clovis points, indicating a strong cultural tie between Mesa peoples and the Clovis civilization, which existed thousands of miles to the south.

For years, the Pacific coast, which had been submerged during the Ice Age, has been devoid of evidence of early human migration.

The Paleo-Indians of this civilization were well-adapted to their coastal environment, subsisting mostly on shellfish, fish, and sea animals.

Contrary to the Clovis-first idea, archaeological evidence suggests that Paleo-Indians first landed on the continent of South America at least 12,500 years ago, and maybe much earlier.

They arranged themselves into small bands in the same way that other early Americans did so that they could migrate more easily from one location to another in search of more food or a more suitable environment.

The earliest are as old as or older than Clovis, and they are culturally distinct from one another.

The food remnants show that these groups foraged for vegetation and captured small wildlife, according to the evidence.

Monte Verde, a location in southern Chile, has been identified as the continent’s earliest known site of human settlement.

The site, which was first excavated in the 1970s, did not appear to correspond with discoveries that put the oldest people in northeastern Asia no earlier than around 11,500 years before the present.

The Yana Rhinoceros Horn site in Siberia, however, revealed that people had been present on the western side of the Bering land bridge as far back as 25,000 years ago, leaving adequate time for such a migration to take place.

It is possible that people slaughtered mastodons in this area during the late Pleistocene period, although the specific date is unknown.

Tropical forest fruits and nuts are the only foods that have survived.

Ancient hearths in Quebrada Tacahuay and Quebrada Jaguay contained remnants of stone tools as well as remains of shellfish, small fish, and birds, but no remains of large game were found.

It was towards the end of the twentieth century that a handful of sites had shown evidence of human occupancy that went back at least 11,000 years.

Nuts, beans, fish, shellfish, and small game animals are among the food remnants discovered.

Brazil’s Caverna da Pedra Pintada, Santana de Riacho, and Lapa do Boquete are among the locations on the list.

The location of Fell’s Cave in Patagonia was discovered for the first time in the 1930s.

They were originally thought to be the same as Clovis points, but it is now recognized that they were created and fashioned in a distinct way.

The Los Toldos civilization was located further north and west. Its archaeological sites feature rock drawings, stemmed, triangular points, and signs of hunting for a variety of different foods, among other things.

Folsom People

“The Amateur Involvement in the Discovery of the Folsom Type Site,” Chesopiean23, no. 4, George Agogino, “The Amateur Involvement in the Discovery of the Folsom Type Site” (1985). “Fowler-Parrish Site: A Folsom Campsite in Eastern Colorado,” by George A. Agogino and Al Parrish, published in Plains Anthropologist16 (May 1971). ” Folsom Adaptive Systems in the Upper Gunnison Basin, Colorado: An Analysis of the Mountaineer Site,” by Brian N. Andrews, is available online. 2010. Sloan Emery and Dennis Stanford’s “Preliminary Report on the Archaeological Investigations at the Cattle Guard Site, Alamosa County, Colorado,” published in Southwestern Lore48, is a preliminary report on archaeological investigations at the Cattle Guard Site in Alamosa County, Colorado (March 1982).

27, no.

Figgins, “The Antiquity of Man in America,” vol.

3, Jesse D.

C.

Hurst’s “A Folsom Location in the San Luis Valley, Colorado: A Preliminary Report,” published in Southwestern Lore7, is a preliminary report on a Folsom location in the San Luis Valley, Colorado (September 1941).

“Red Ocher, Endscrapers, and the Folsom Occupation of the Lindenmeier Site, Colorado,” by Jason LaBelle and Cody Newton, is available online.

“The Lindenmeier Folsom Site,” by Lithic Casting Lab, published on February 29, 2012.

Meltzer, Folsom: New Archaeological Investigations of a Classic Paleoindian Bison Kill) (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006).

Naze in Southwestern Lore52 (December 1986) and a paper by Bonnie L.

Additional Information on the Folsom Complex: Report on the Second Season’s Investigations at the Lindenmeier Site in Northern Colorado (with 12 plates),”Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections95, no.

H.

Folsom Site, New Mexico, a site maintained by Southern Methodist University, last updated on June 10, 2011.

Folsom Culture is a term coined by the University of Oklahoma.

Folsom Tools is a publication from Western State Colorado University.

4, is a classic work on the subject (Denver: Denver Museum of Natural History, 1957).

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