How To Describe The Culture Of A Company

Contents

33 Words to Describe Your Company Culture

Because it plays such a major and crucial part in the formation of social order, sociologists place a high value on culture. When we talk about social order, we’re talking about how society is stable because people have come to agree on rules and conventions that allow us to collaborate, function as a society, as well as (hopefully) live together in peace and harmony. There are positive and negative features of social order, according to sociologists. According to the notion of traditional French sociologist Émile Durkheim, both material and non-material parts of culture are significant since they help to hold society together.

Durkheim discovered via his studies that when people gather together to participate in rituals, they reinforce the culture that they share and, as a result, strengthen the social bonds that bind them together even more.

In the social sciences, Karl Marx, a well-known Prussian social thinker and activist, pioneered the critical approach to culture, which he named after himself.

Subscribing to popular ideas, conventions and beliefs keeps individuals involved in uneven social institutions that do not operate in their best interests, but instead benefit a powerful minority, according to his reasoning.

Sociologists today see Marx’s theory in action in the way that most people in capitalist societies believe success comes from hard work and dedication, and that anyone can live a good life if they do these things.

Culture may be a force for tyranny and dominance, but it can also be a force for innovation, resistance, and freedom when used in the right manner.

1. Transparent

Employees and consumers alike place a high value on openness; nonetheless, many businesses struggle to implement transparency in the workplace, particularly when it comes to critical information and business choices.

Take a look at how Buffer uses transparency to drive their company’s core principles forward. With our org chart software and employee directory, Pingboard increases transparency and strengthens connections among your employees.

2. Connected

When it comes to important information and choices, both employees and consumers place a high value on openness. However, many businesses fail to implement transparency in the workplace, despite this fact. Watch this video to learn more about how Buffer use transparency to drive their company’s principles forward. With our org chart software and employee directory, Pingboard increases transparency and strengthens connections among your staff.

3. Nurturing

Employees and consumers alike place a high value on openness; nonetheless, many businesses struggle to implement transparency in the workplace, particularly when it comes to critical information and choices. Take a look at how Buffer leverages transparency to guide their company’s core beliefs. With our org chart software and employee directory, Pingboard increases transparency and connects your staff!

4. Autonomous

Employees and consumers alike place a high value on openness; nonetheless, many businesses struggle to implement transparency in the workplace, particularly when it comes to crucial information and choices. Check out how Buffer leverages openness to guide their company’s core beliefs. With our org chart software and employee directory, Pingboard increases transparency and connects your employees.

5. Motivating

Employees that work in a positive atmosphere are more energetic and driven to meet their company’s and individual performance objectives.

6. Happy

It is not enough for employees to be content; you also want them to be happy at work and love what they do in order for them to stay on board and avoid leaving. Tony Hsieh, the CEO of Zappos, places a strong emphasis on employee satisfaction and work-life balance inside the firm. Check to see how satisfied your staff are!

7. Progressive

A firm that is developing, experimenting, and attempting new things is appealing to employees, and this is precisely what progressive organizations strive to achieve. High-growth companies frequently have more progressive work conditions than larger corporations. For example, high-growth startupsoften tend to have more progressive work conditions than larger corporations.

8. Flexible

Employees are no longer willing to live the 9-5 “cubicle lifestyle” that has been the standard for so long in the office, which has changed the nature of the workplace from what it once was. Working from home, HubSpot is able to be adaptable and continuously highlights the necessity of a healthy work-life balance.

9. Casual

Workers today (particularly millennials and Generation Zers) expect their workplace to be a laid-back setting with a casual mood and dress code, according to a recent survey.

10. Innovative

People in the workplace nowadays (particularly millennials and Generation Zers) anticipate a comfortable setting with a casual mood and dress code, as well as a flexible work schedule.

11. Inclusive

Diversity and inclusion is a trendy subject in human resources and recruiting, and it’s also a top goal for a large number of businesses. In an inclusive workplace, diversity is always embraced and respected, regardless of its source.

12. Fun

Who says that working can’t be enjoyable?

Employee engagement and retention are more likely to be improved in organizations that provide opportunity for fun on a consistent basis.

13. Curious

Isn’t it true that labor may be enjoyable? Employee engagement and retention are more likely to be improved in organizations that provide opportunity for fun on a regular basis.

14. Collaborative

Who says work cannot be enjoyable? Employee engagement and retention are higher in organizations that provide opportunity for fun on a regular basis.

15. Relaxed

A relaxed work environment is one in which employees are given some latitude to carry out their jobs in the manner that they find most comfortable and productive.

16. Challenging

It is important for employees to be pushed and challenged in the workplace so that they may learn from their mistakes, grow, and adapt.

17. Empathetic

An empathic workplace is one where feelings are recognized and acknowledged via active listening, open communication, and assistance during challenging times. Recruiterbox makes an effort to create such an atmosphere by evaluating applicants during interviews to discover who are the most empathic and compassionate.

18. Engaging

People who work for an engaging business are strongly involved in and driven to produce their best job for the firm, and they are more likely to stay with the company over time.

19. Rewarding

A rewarding corporate culture is one in which employees are rewarded when they go above and beyond requirements or when they surpass their own expectations. An acknowledgement (whether in the form of a verbal commendation or the donation of money) is much appreciated! Peer-to-peer recognition campaigns can encourage employees to appreciate one another’s accomplishments. Encourage workers to recognize and congratulate one another by implementing peer-to-peer recognition activities.

20. Nimble

Company agility and adaptability is essential for nimble organizations, which are constantly eager to course-correct and reassess their goals, procedures, and methods.

21. Respectful

Employees who work in a respectful environment are encouraged to voice their thoughts and ideas without being interrupted, and their coworkers are expected to be courteous when they do so, according to the company.

22. Trusting

When it comes to developing solid working relationships, effective teams, and a healthy business culture, trust is an essential component. It’s also a two-way street in both directions.

See what your employees would change

In order to generate solid working relationships, effective teams, and a healthy business culture, trust must be established from the beginning. There are two sides to this coin.

Negative words to describe company culture

The following terms represent the sort of business culture that you do not want to cultivate in your organization:

24. Toxic

The presence of toxic working conditions, such as a negative and disruptive environment, job, or individuals on the team indicates the presence of a toxic workplace.

25. Boring

Of all, no one enjoys being bored at work, especially when the minutes pass so slowly that they seem to go for hours. Companies with a stale culture are doomed to failure.

26. Siloed

Despite technology improvements that have assisted in closing the gap, some firms continue to operate in silos.

Departments are not communicating with one another, and communication is absent, which is both annoying and inefficient.

27. Outdated

Some businesses are just out of date, whether as a result of outmoded technology, outdated business processes, or a combination of the two.

28. Biased

Bias is never acceptable in the workplace, whether it is conscious or unconscious. However, it continues to be a significant issue for a large number of businesses.

29. Unsupportive

Employees who work in an unsupportive workplace do not receive the encouragement and support they require to advance within the organization, develop professionally, and broaden their skill sets.

30. Hostile

Employees who work in an unsupportive workplace lack the encouragement and resources they require to advance within the organization, develop professionally, and broaden their skill sets.

31. Stressful

All of us have had experience working for a corporation where every single circumstance that arises is addressed as if it were a fire drill. We can all agree that no one wants to spend their days in that sort of setting on a regular basis.

32. Micromanaged

Micromanagement is something that no one enjoys. Employees that are micromanaged are often less engaged, and they are less likely to remain with the company long term.

33. Disengaged

A disengaged culture is one in which employees do not wish to be a part of their organization. Low employee engagement has been shown to be associated with high staff turnover rates, poor job performance, and inefficient business operations. Your company’s culture establishes the setting in which your employees operate and sets the tone for what is to come in the future for your company. Defining what you want your company’s culture to be is the first step toward creating a workplace that workers like working in—and ideally these phrases, both good and negative, can serve as a starting point for that process.

Sign up today and get started.

Connect your people now with Pingboard

OFFERTRY FOR NEW MEMBERS For the first three months, you can get WeWork All Access at a discounted rate. More information may be found here. The culture of your firm is the essence of its individuality. You may conceive about it in the following way: What would be the first impression your company would make on someone, and what would be the primary topics of conversation if your firm met someone for the first time? Understanding and being able to articulate a company’s culture is crucial because it may impact how you make decisions about who you recruit as well as how you engage with other businesses and members of the public.

Furthermore, in recent years, a common corporate culture has emerged as a significant differentiation for enterprise firms.

Because business develops and evolves, it is probable that the culture of your organization changes as well. Even so, it’s critical to have a clear vision of what you want your company’s culture to be from the beginning; this will assist you in guiding your company’s vision as the company’s leader.

Common words used to describe a company culture

The following phrases are frequently used to characterize a company’s culture in a favourable light:

  • It demonstrates that workers interact with one another in a pleasant manner during the course of their day. In addition to “warm,” “sociable,” and “friendly,” additional terms that may be used to characterize this sort of culture are “friendly.” It indicates that employees are encouraged to explore the full potential of their skill sets, and that they are likely to progress as a result of their work experience. Additionally, terms such as “stretching,” “exacting,” and “resilient” can be used. • Motivating: This implies that the organization is motivating and that employees will feel obligated to put up their best effort. You may also define a motivating corporate culture as “exciting, active, or driven,” depending on your perspective. This suggests that workers will feel involved in their job since it corresponds to the interests of those who work for them. Also acceptable phrases are “enriching, invigorating, or energizing” when describing culture.
  • Nurturing: Demonstrates that the organization is committed to the growth and development of its personnel. “Caring,” “fostering,” and “supporting” are all terms used to describe this type of culture. To be collaborative means that people and teams will work effectively together across functional lines in order to achieve their objectives. Apart from the term “collaborative,” you may use the phrases “group-focused,” “cooperative,” and “unified.” • Autonomous: Expresses that employees are trusted to take responsibility for their job and that they have the ability to make individual decisions to improve the results. “Independent, individualistic, and adaptable” are some more characteristics you might use to describe yourself.
You might be interested:  When Did Thomas Edison First Make His Impact On Culture And Society

A few examples of terms that firms use to characterize their corporate culture are listed below. While you may naturally draw toward a few phrases, make an effort to come up with a few more that are less prevalent and distinctive to your firm. This will assist your organization in distinguishing itself from the competition. First and foremost, you’ll need to have a deeper knowledge of the aspects that contribute to a company’s overall culture before you can begin selecting descriptors. WeWork The address is 27 Calle Eloy Gonzalo in Madrid.

How to describe your company culture

There are various important components to a company’s culture. When explaining yours, keep the following points in mind.

Mission

What is the ultimate goal that your organization wishes to achieve? Do you want to make a difference in the world by bringing innovation, providing the finest customer experience possible, or creating high-quality goods that people can’t stop raving about? You may make your goal statement as brief as a single phrase or as lengthy as a paragraph or two, but it should be as concise as possible.

Values and ethics

So, what is the ultimate goal of your organization, and how will you get there? Interested in making a difference in the world via innovation, providing the greatest possible customer experience, or creating high-quality goods that people can’t stop talking about? You may make your goal statement as short as a single phrase or as lengthy as a paragraph or two, but it should be as concise as possible.

  • Respect and fairness
  • Trust and honesty
  • A growth attitude
  • Teamwork
  • Employee involvement and promotion chances
  • Communication and transparency
  • Diversity
  • And results. Work-life balance
  • Making a difference in the world

When selecting which values are most important to your firm, you may want to consider the ethical implications of your decisions. A concrete outcome in the monthly balance sheets, for example, is something that every corporation wants to see. You must, however, consider how far you are willing to go in order to achieve those results; if you cut corners with your products or services in order to save money, or if you resort to unethical tactics in order to beat out a competitor, your company’s reputation is likely to suffer in the process.

Consider your beliefs and ethics to be your final goal, and your policies to be multiple paths that will take you there.

Work environment

When selecting which values are most essential to your firm, it’s possible that ethics will come into play. A concrete outcome in the monthly balance sheets, for example, is something that every corporation seeks to achieve. The extent to which you are willing to go to achieve those results, on the other hand, must be considered; if you cut corners with your products or services in order to save money, or if you use unethical tactics in order to beat a competitor, your company’s reputation is likely to suffer as a result.

Consider your principles and ethics to be your destination, and your policies to be multiple paths that will take you to your target. 11 Ulitsa Timura Frunze, Moscow is the location of WeWork.

Interactions between team members

When selecting which values are most essential to your firm, ethics may come into play. A concrete outcome in the monthly balance sheets, for example, is something that every organization seeks to witness. You must, however, evaluate how far you are ready to go in order to achieve those outcomes; if you cut corners with your products or services in order to save money, or if you turn to unethical tactics in order to beat out a rival, your company’s reputation is likely to suffer as a result. Every policy you develop for your firm should be based on the principles that you have established.

WeWork Ulitsa Timura Frunze, 11, Moscow is a coworking space.

Implementing culture at work

Once you’ve determined where your company’s culture is now and where you want it to go in the future, you can begin developing real rules and practices that are consistent with your desired culture.

Evangelize and measure your company culture

Consider how you will convey your company’s culture to your current team members in detail. Prepare a presentation that will help you communicate your vision for the culture. Write out what you want the culture to look like. Meeting with your team provides you with the opportunity to do the following:

  • Find out what they think about the present corporate culture. Some of the difficulties they may be aware of are ones that you haven’t even considered addressing
  • Examine their reactions to the new culture that you’re attempting to instill in them. Collect their suggestions for ways to enhance the company’s culture.

You may also create clear objectives that are relevant to your cultural context. There are certain things that are virtually difficult to quantify, such as trust and transparency. You may, however, conduct quarterly surveys among your employees to gauge their perceptions of how the company’s culture is evolving. Other objectives are more easily quantifiable. In order to stimulate team thinking, you can decide to rebuild your workplace before the end of the year, start organizing a monthly social event for the team, or start adopting new collaboration software.

Find the right people

Businesses are increasingly valuing soft talents above hard abilities, and this trend is expected to continue. Even if you can teach a person how to use a certain computer program, changing their personality is considerably more difficult — possibly even impossible — than teaching them how to use a computer program. As a result, when hiring new employees, always endeavor to have a thorough understanding of their personal beliefs, as well as an understanding of how they would interact with the other members of your organization.

WeWork 515 N State in Chicago is a coworking space.

Shift the company mindset

Unless you had a clear vision of what you wanted your business culture to become before hiring, it’s possible that you recruited people who didn’t exhibit the characteristics you were looking for in your employees. You are not required to let go of these very bright individuals. You may be able to motivate them to make positive changes by doing the following:

  • Promoting new policies and practices that attempt to change the culture of the organization with zeal and enthusiasm. Consider the following: making it apparent that you’re eager to listen to comments regarding improvements from everyone, even those who were skeptics from the start
  • Using tangible facts to communicate exactly how essential corporate culture is
  • Employee retention, productivity, reputation, and product quality may all benefit from a positive company culture. In fact, according to a research conducted by Columbia University, the chance of turnover in organizations with a positive culture is less than 14 percent. When working at an organization with a weak culture, that figure increases to over 50%.

Take your company culture beyond the office

It’s important to remember that, while most of the time your company’s culture is focused on what happens within the organization, it may have a significant influence on how others perceive your firm. If an employee leaves a company because of a hostile culture, they could tell others about their unpleasant experience by posting reviews on review sites. More than that, though, a positive business culture may be a powerful marketing tool for your organization. For example, if you allow your employees to take paid time off to volunteer in the local community, news will go around about your commitment to assisting those less fortunate.

It may be difficult to describe your company’s culture, and altering that culture in a way that is beneficial to your firm and your workers can be much more difficult.

WeWork’s space options, which include on-demand, all-access, and dedicated spaces, assist companies of all sizes in overcoming their most difficult obstacles.

30 Powerful Words to Describe Company Culture: Create your Culture and Build your Brand

Date of publication: September 16, 2020 The most recent update was made on January 13, 2022.

When you’re looking to describe company culture for your own organization you first need to learn what company culture really is.

Company culture is a complex amalgamation of a company’s goals, beliefs, ethics, and the general atmosphere in which employees operate. It mixes the principles of a corporation with the more practical realities of how the organization actually does business. The culture of a company influences the outcomes of all aspects of its operations, from how it completes business procedures to how information is communicated to how it plans to expand in the future. When it comes to an employer’s brand, one of the first things that potential workers look at when deciding whether or not to join a firm is the culture of the organization.

Because of this, it is only natural that you would want to select the most appropriate phrases to describe the culture.

When attempting to characterize your company’s culture, start with the following as a starting point:

  • What is the mission of your organization? Does your company have a mission statement? Mission statements outline the rationale for a company’s existence as well as the company’s ultimate aim. Whether or whether your organization delivers
  • ValuesEthics: These two concepts are intertwined. Employee handbooks are an excellent tool for outlining a company’s principles and ethics, as well as the manner in which workers are encouraged and expected to conduct themselves. Dedication, honesty, integrity, and responsibility are just a few of the characteristics to consider. Environment: The physical environment of your office plays an equally essential role in determining the culture of your organization. Is the work environment more informal or more formal than you would like? Does it appear that workers may walk into the CEO’s office and ask questions, or is there a more established structure in place

The goal statement, values, ethics, and work environment of your firm can help you gain a deeper grasp of the foundations that support your organization’s cultural identity. To help you define corporate culture, we’ve put together this list of 30 terms that characterize company culture to get you started:

  1. Transparent: A transparent firm working culture places a strong emphasis on open and honest communication as well as the exchange of information. This can present itself in a variety of ways, but it displays that the company’s executives are concerned about its employees’ understanding of why things are done the way they are
  2. And Organizational Culture that is Results-Oriented: A results-oriented approach to organizational culture promotes activities and outcomes. You must first establish the outcomes you want to achieve with your team members, and then strategically implement those outcomes. Similar to results-oriented organizations, performance-driven organizations are motivated by team achievement and the pursuit of superior business outcomes. If you find a term challenging, it’s probably because it has either good or bad implications, and you should investigate further into it. When a company’s culture is challenging and encouraging, it creates opportunity for employees to develop their skills and advance their careers. Negatively, it has the potential to cause tension through a lack of communication, bad management, or a lack of defined objectives among team members
  3. However, it is not always the case. Employees are kept engaged and interested in their tasks when their corporate culture is engaging. Strong employee engagement is characterized by good manager-employee connections, regular communication, a healthy work-life balance, and a sense of belonging
  4. It is also characterized by low turnover. Innovative: Your organization is constantly looking for new and better ways to do things, and they aren’t hesitant to challenge the status quo in their pursuit of success. Starting up and technology firms are typically coupled with the term “startup.” Autonomous: If employees are actively encouraged to finish projects on their own without supervisors micromanaging, you may describe your workplace culture as one in which you have faith in your employees’ ability to generate excellent outcomes. Employee knowledge and ideas are maximized in a collaborative work environment, which stresses the need to work together and exchange information in order to achieve success as well as optimize employee knowledge and ideas. This cooperation allows employees to collaborate across departmental or functional lines, which has a positive impact on overall company performance
  5. Inclusive: While inclusivity has become a buzzword in recent years, it is a critical factor in ensuring a company’s long-term success and the well-being of its employees. Employee diversity are embraced and uplifted in an inclusive workplace where everyone is treated equally. They provide a sense of belonging among employees from various walks of life, allowing them to feel appreciated and respected. Adaptable: If your organization is comfortable with timetable adjustments, is willing to experiment with new problem-solving tactics, or is generally unfazed by major concerns, you may characterize them as adaptable. Casual:Perhaps your organization places greater emphasis on the speed with which tasks are completed than on the attire that workers wear to the office. Alternatively, you may work for a firm that departs early on Fridays for team happy hours or team-building activities. Casual employers feel that employees who are comfortable are also industrious employees. Motivating: By providing employees with support and opportunities, motivating work environments motivate people to constantly produce their best job. It also has the additional benefit of lowering absenteeism and increasing staff retention. A moral workplace culture ensures that every management and employee is committed to upholding the values of their organization and that every work is carried out in accordance with the law. The principles and ethics of a company are vitally crucial in order to create a feeling of trustworthiness. Inquisitive: A curious business culture encourages people to pursue their passions and provides the necessary resources to make this feasible
  6. Curious: Workplaces that are innovative and imaginative foster an environment of innovation and imagination. Moreover, this is not exclusive to artistic industries
  7. Any company may nurture creative culture by thinking outside of the box. Employers who have a supportive business culture actively help their employees by promoting healthy interpersonal interactions and psychological well-being. Employee Recognition: Do your supervisors actively provide comments and support when their staff are performing admirably? When workers go above and above, they are recognized in a culture of acknowledgment. Employees who work in empowered environments are encouraged to go above and beyond their typical day-to-day obligations and to extend their talents. Employees who work in a fun environment may benefit from advantages such as endless coffee or workplace games, which help to keep them optimistic and lively. While having a good time at work is not the be-all and end-all of culture, it is crucial to discover methods to have a good time at work. Welcoming: A welcoming corporate culture swiftly integrates new team members while also providing more tenured employees with opportunity to connect and engage with one another on a daily basis. Meaningful:Many employees want to believe that their work has a positive influence on the world. In order for workers to understand how their work contributes to the greater good, a purposeful business culture ties work to the larger picture. Formal:In the corporate sector, it is unavoidable that most workplaces have a certain level of formality about them. Formal work cultures, on the other hand, need some sort of dress code, tend to be more hierarchical in nature, and may have more organized communication rules. Teams working in silos: When teams operate in silos, they miss out on opportunities to collaborate. When teams are separated by organizational boundaries, exchanging information between them is not encouraged, most often in order to promote team concentration, but this has the unintended consequence of diminishing team efficiency. Unethical behavior: Perhaps supervisors take credit for their employees’ efforts, or perhaps a team member cuts shortcuts on particular tasks because they believe no one would notice the difference. Cultural norms that are unethical set the stage for future difficulties. Outdated: When we talk about outdated business culture, we might refer to things like technology, communication techniques, company regulations, and so on. It is critical for a business to retain continuity while simultaneously evolving with the times. Companies with rigid corporate cultures allow limited space for innovation and are heavily influenced by rules and traditions. It’s common to hear people say things like “this is how we’ve always done things, and this is how we’ll continue to do it.” Employees may grow bored if they are not given enough challenges or if the initiatives that are accessible do not pique their interest enough. A good learning and development program that encourages employees to pursue their interests can assist to mitigate this problem. Employees’ negative stress levels rise if they believe they are under too much pressure, have insufficient resources, or do not have enough space to let off steam. Employees’ disengagement and burnout can be prevented if a stressful workplace culture is handled promptly. Employers in a demanding workplace culture are expected to perform above their capabilities, and their employers may or may not provide them with the tools they require to do so. Companies with toxic cultures tend to have employees that are burned out and disinterested in their jobs. Excessive office politics, poor communication, and gaslighting are all factors that can lead to a toxic workplace where employees do not feel appreciated.
You might be interested:  Which Of The Following Is A Characteristic Of A High-context Culture

Your firm’s culture establishes the atmosphere in which your employees operate and serves as a blueprint for the future of your company. Defining what you want your business’s culture to be is the first step toward creating a workplace that workers like working in—and ideally these terms to define corporate culture, both good and bad, can serve as a starting point for you. Defining your corporate culture and identifying good and bad characteristics in connection to your mission statement, values, ethics, and environment will assist you in determining which areas you want to improve and which areas you want to modify in your organization.

Remote teams may use Hirebook to relate their day-to-day actions to strategic corporate results through the use of a performance management tool.

Photo courtesy of Freepik.com

34 Words Describing Company Culture

  1. Finding a Job
  2. Career Guide
  3. 34 Words to Describe Company Culture
  4. Finding a Job

The Indeed Editorial Team contributed to this article. The date is February 22, 2021. When you’re looking for a job, the culture of the company is something you should consider. It influences how satisfied and supported you feel in your job, and it has a significant impact on whether or not you choose to remain with a company for the long term. It is important to understand the different sorts of corporate cultures and what they imply so that you may ask better questions throughout the recruiting process and have a better understanding of the culture of each firm.

In this post, we will discuss 34 distinct terms that are used to characterize business culture, as well as an explanation of what each of these phrases means in the context of the workplace. Related: Organizational Culture Is Important for a Variety of Reasons

Words describing company culture

Here are x words that you may use to characterize the culture of your company:

1. Connected

In this sort of corporate culture, all of the employees feel appreciated and that they are a part of something bigger. Employees are engaged, motivated, and committed to achieving common goals in organizations where the culture is intertwined. Related: How to Develop a Company Culture: Case Studies and Suggestions

2. Casual

A casual culture is one in which the workplace is usually easygoing, with a casual dress code being the norm. Employees who work in a casual workplace culture may be able to work flexible hours and on a schedule that is most convenient for their personal and professional life.

3. Fun

Casual culture refers to an environment where employees are encouraged to dress in casual attire. Work hours and schedules are more flexible in a casual workplace culture, so employees may fit their jobs around their personal and professional life.

4. Collaborative

A collaborative organization is one that recognizes and rewards cooperation. Collaboration is an intentional and frequent practice in this sort of society. It’s an element of the processes that govern how the workers go about their daily work lives.

5. Transparent

In a collaborative organization, collaboration is praised and celebrated. Collaboration is intentional and frequent in this sort of society. Employees go through this procedure every day as part of their job responsibilities.

6. Nutruting

A nurturing business culture is one in which the leaders collaborate with individual workers to help them develop professional objectives, so making it simpler for them to advance their careers within the firm.

6. Happy

Companies with this sort of culture are concerned with ensuring that their employees are satisfied in order for them to remain with the firm for an extended length of time. This sort of culture frequently stresses work-life balance, allowing employees to feel supported both within and outside of the workplace. Relevant:Examples of Positive Corporate Culture and Their Benefits

7. Progressive

Having a progressive business culture means that the firm is always evolving and experimenting with new ideas. Employees in this type of firm are encouraged to express themselves creatively and to think beyond the box.

8. Autonomous

Having a progressive business culture means that the organization is always evolving and experimenting with new concepts. Creativity and new ideas from its employees are cherished in this sort of organization.

9. Motivating

A motivated culture is one in which the organization places emphasis on motivating and inspiring its people to accomplish performance and business goals in order to contribute to the success of the organization as a whole. A highly engaged workforce is one of the hallmarks of a highly motivated corporate culture.

10. Inclusive

A society that is inclusive is one that celebrates differences. This form of corporate culture promotes mutual respect and the constructive acknowledgement of diversity among its employees. Everyone feels heard and respected when they work in an inclusive workplace atmosphere.

11. Challenging

Employees are challenged to develop, learn, and adapt in a difficult working atmosphere that encourages them to do so.

Growth and professional growth are encouraged, as is the willingness to take calculated risks.

12. Relaxed

Employees in this sort of work environment are given the flexibility to work in a manner that is most comfortable for them, which in turn helps them to be more productive in general. Environments that are relaxed tend to feature casual clothing rules and, in certain cases, a flexible work schedule.

13. Empathetic

Employee sentiments are recognized in empathetic work cultures, and open communication is promoted amongst coworkers. Employees are aware that their leaders are there for them in tough times and that their sentiments are respected by their supervisors and managers.

14. Rewarding

Employees that go above and beyond are rewarded in a rewarding corporate culture because their efforts have exceeded expectations. In many organizations, formal recognition problems exist, and workers are encouraged to recognize and celebrate the accomplishments of one another. In related news, here are the five most common types of corporate culture.

15. Engaging

employees feel linked to the firm and are motivated to produce their best job when they work in an environment with a strong sense of teamwork. Employees who are engaged in their work are considerably more likely to be satisfied with their jobs and to remain loyal to their employers. Companies with a positive corporate culture tend to have higher employee retention rates than their competitors.

16. Curious

A curious workplace culture is one that encourages employees to experiment with new ways of thinking, new processes, and new approaches to problem-solving techniques. When it comes to finding novel answers to everyday difficulties, curious firms are generally collaborative in nature and foster innovation and excellent communication across teams.

17. Respectful

Uncurious workplace cultures are those that encourage the exploration of novel ways of thinking, novel processes, and novel approaches to problem-solving in the workplace. When it comes to finding novel answers to everyday difficulties, curious firms are frequently collaborative, encouraging innovation and excellent communication across teams.

18. Trusting

Building solid and successful professional relationships is dependent on the ability to trust one another. Employees that work in a trusting environment are confident in their ability to express themselves freely. Furthermore, students are given encouragement and good reinforcement for doing so, regardless of the topic matter being discussed. This contributes to the development of trust between the company’s leadership and its team members.

19. Welcoming

When a firm has a pleasant work culture, employees feel more at ease and are encouraged to form internal networks inside the organization. When an employee initially starts working for a company, they are often presented to this welcoming setting, which serves as their first impression of the company.

20. Nimble

To achieve high performance, an organization must be agile enough to adjust quickly to changes as they occur.

Companies that are nimble are open and eager to make adjustments when they are necessary, as well as to rethink their tactics, strategies, and business processes.

21. Fast-paced

A agile company has the flexibility to adjust to change when it is required in order to achieve high performance. Firms with agility adapt to changing conditions and reassess their business approaches, strategies, and procedures as needed.

22. Positive

A positive corporate culture is one that places a strong emphasis on respect and civility among its employees. Positive reinforcement is also promoted in order to maintain high levels of staff morale and productivity.

23. Family

A corporate culture that is based on the belief that its employees are members of the same family. Employees at this sort of firm are given opportunities and encouraged to spend time together outside of the workplace. They also encourage team members to maintain a healthy work-life balance and to recognize and celebrate significant life milestones.

24. Integrity

Employees who operate in environments with a strong emphasis on integrity place a high value on being honest. Companies that place a high value on integrity communicate openly and honestly with their employees about the status of the company. These organizations recognize and reward individuals for their contributions, and they are dedicated to ensuring that the appropriate team members are acknowledged.

25. Toxic

The workplace is usually disturbed by drama or argument when there is a hostile work culture in existence. A toxic workplace atmosphere causes employees to be dissatisfied, which negatively influences their productivity and results in increased turnover.

26. Outdated

Companies with an out-of-date corporate culture are frequently plagued by out-of-date business practices that are preventing them from progressing. There are some methods and practices that they may employ simply because that is the way they have always been carried out. Furthermore, they may employ old and inefficient technologies to conduct their firm.

27. Boring

Boring cultures result in companies that are stagnant, with little room for innovation and creativity. Employees that work in a dull firm are more dissatisfied with their jobs, and turnover is frequently high.

28. Biased

A biased culture, whether deliberate or unintentional, may lead to issues such as workplace discrimination, overinflated confidence, and an unhealthy aversion to risk-taking in an organization.

29. Siloed

When people or even entire departments refuse to communicate knowledge with one another, this is referred to as an organizational silo. They can emerge as a result of workers or groups being more concerned with their immediate job and outcomes than with the bigger company’s objectives. When communication between employees and departments is ineffective, it may have a negative influence on a company’s long-term goals as well as its productivity.

30. Hostile

When people or even entire departments refuse to exchange information with one another, this is referred to as an organization’s silos. The fact that they arise is often due to the fact that people or groups are more concerned with their immediate job and outcomes than with the greater company’s objectives.

When communication between employees and departments is inadequate, it may have a negative influence on a company’s long-term goals as well as its overall productivity.

31. Stressful

While most employees feel some level of stress at work from time to time, when stress gets ingrained in the company’s culture, the pressure and stress become more widespread and difficult to cope with. Employee burnout is common in this sort of culture, and productivity suffers as a result of the reduced motivation.

32. Disengaged

Employees that operate in a disengaged organizational culture are more likely to exhibit poor performance and to adopt inefficient methods of performing their tasks. As a result of disengagement, employees are more likely to leave their jobs, as they do not feel linked to the firm or its long-term goals. It is common for morale to be poor among employees who do not have a sense of belonging to the firm, making it harder to fulfill corporate objectives.

You might be interested:  Which Country Is Known To Have A Monochronic Culture

33. Micromanaged

In the context of management, micromanagement refers to a style in which the manager carefully monitors and supervises the work and conduct of their team. When there is a widespread culture of micromanagement throughout the organization, independence is discouraged, and employee turnover is significant. In most cases, employees are disengaged from their employers and their jobs because they do not have the flexibility and freedom to do their tasks on their own. In this sort of setting, there is a high rate of employee turnover.

34. Unsupportive

Employees in this sort of work environment do not receive the assistance they require to enhance their careers, expand their skill sets, and grow and advance within the organization.

How To Describe the Culture of the Company You Work For

  1. Career Guide
  2. Career Development
  3. How To Describe the Culture of the Company You Work For

The Indeed Editorial Team contributed to this article. The date is May 20, 2021. If you are considering accepting a job offer, the company’s culture is something that you should take into consideration before making your decision. The majority of individuals desire to work in a happy workplace where they are appreciated. Establishing what values you want to integrate and how you want your workplace to feel might be a good place to start if you’re interested in developing an attractive business culture.

Related: How to Develop a Company Culture: Case Studies and Suggestions

What is company culture?

The general attitude and character of an organization are referred to as the company culture. It explains how team members connect with one another, cooperate with one another, and work alongside one another in the workplace. The aims, beliefs, and personnel of an organization may all influence how a company’s culture evolves through time. Employee retention rates rise when an organization has a great work culture because it attracts fresh talent, boosts engagement, and raises employee retention rates.

Determining your present corporate culture may also assist you in more successfully marketing vacant job opportunities, identifying areas for improvement, and making recruiting decisions that are consistent with your organization’s values and goals.

More information may be found at: Organizational Culture Is Important for a Variety of Reasons

Common words used to describe a company’s culture

Every organization’s culture is unique, but learning how other companies define their cultures can assist you in describing your own culture. Listed below are a few terms that are frequently used to describe the culture of a company:

Connected

The open communication and high levels of employee involvement that characterize a connected corporate culture are its greatest assets. Employees frequently feel appreciated, welcomed, and as though they are a part of something bigger. They have the ability to discuss ideas rapidly and work on projects on a frequent basis. In addition to providing employees with a sense of purpose, developing alignment within your team may help you enhance your company’s overall productivity.

Innovative

Those companies that have an innovative business culture place a strong emphasis on growth and development. This style of culture encourages problem-solving skills, critical thinking, and the generation of new ideas. Encourage workers to collaborate on projects with one another and invest in the professional growth of your team members if you want to create an inventive work environment for them. This can assist you in improving the overall skills of your team, resulting in higher-quality goods and services, as well as increased productivity.

Engaging

Employees who work in an engaging business culture are more likely to be invested in the overall success of the corporation. They are committed to the company’s basic principles and endeavor to produce their best job for the organization. Involved business cultures support innovation, develop new ideas, encourage open talks, and place a strong emphasis on enhancing efficiency. Identify and communicate your organization’s accomplishments with the whole team, as well as your broader goals, in order to foster an engaged business culture.

Transparent

A transparent corporate culture is desired by many employees and consumers because it fosters honesty among all parties involved. Organizations with a transparent organizational culture are forthright about their intentions and activities, and they encourage employees to do the same. This helps to guarantee that workers have access to all of the information they require in order to make sound decisions. It can also help to build a sense of trust among members of your team, promote engagement, and raise the rate at which employees stay on the job.

Inclusive

An inclusive business culture is one that emphasizes the importance of making employees feel valued and connected. Organizations with an inclusive workplace culture strive for diversity and recognize the importance of diverse points of view. employees of all backgrounds have equal opportunity to rise within the organization, learn new skills and make significant contributions to key decision-making processes.

In order to foster an inclusive workplace culture, recognize and reward your employees for their efforts and abilities, encourage your human resources department to interview a diverse pool of applicants, and encourage open communication among all members of your team.

Collaborative

Organizations with a collaborative business culture place a heavy focus on the need of working together in order to accomplish successful outcomes. A collaborative workplace culture encourages effective communication and encourages the development of innovative problem-solving skills. It may also aid in the development of stronger work connections, the development of trust among your team, and the enhancement of productivity. Consider introducing technologies to make communication simpler, delegating duties to various employees depending on their skills, and rewarding employees who work together to discover solutions in order to foster a collaborative workplace culture.

Nurturing

Employees that work in a caring environment have the opportunity to further their careers inside the corporation. Employees may be given the opportunity to engage in seminars, network with other professionals, enroll in educational programs, or work closely with a mentor, among other things. Individuals will feel more appreciated if you make an investment in their development. A supportive business culture may also help you enhance the quality of your goods and services, foster new thinking, and increase the retention of your employees, among other benefits.

Fast-paced

It is possible that employees who work for firms with a fast-paced workplace culture would find themselves accountable for a wide range of duties at the same time. Employees that work in a fast-paced environment will have more variety and will have the opportunity to develop new abilities. Employees may also discover that they may move up the corporate ladder rather fast. Adaptability, multitasking skills, and a high level of motivation are generally sought for by companies with a fast-paced work culture.

Flexible

Employees who work for companies with a fast-paced workplace culture may find themselves responsible for a diverse variety of responsibilities. Workers can find diversity and the opportunity to gain new skills at a firm with a fast-paced work culture. Workers may also discover that they may move up the corporate ladder rather fast. Organizations with a fast-paced workplace culture frequently look for individuals that are adaptive, skilled at multitasking, and highly driven in their work.

Rewarding

When an employee achieves a key objective or exceeds expectations, a rewarding business culture recognizes and rewards the employee. Organizations with a rewarding business culture may recognize and reward their employees by publicly praising them or by giving them a little gift to convey their appreciation. The employees of a firm with a positive corporate culture are frequently willing to praise one another on their accomplishments. An atmosphere that fosters teamwork, develops a strong work ethic, and makes employees feel valued is what this sort of workplace is all about.

Trusting

It is critical to cultivate a trustworthy workplace culture because it stimulates cooperation, encourages dependability, and reduces stress. Organizations with a trusting business culture frequently enable their workers to choose their own work schedules and to work on their own projects.

If a business has a trusting corporate culture, employees may feel empowered to make their own decisions and express their ideas because they believe that their input is valuable. This has the potential to boost productivity while also improving working relationships.

Nimble

A nimble business culture is one that emphasizes flexibility and adaptability. Organizations that operate in a fast-paced environment frequently attempt to instill a flexible organizational culture into their operations. Employees that operate in a firm with this sort of culture are fast to produce new ideas and eager to reevaluate their existing solutions. They frequently possess great problem-solving talents that are inspired by their surroundings. Promote the development of new tactics, methods, and techniques that result in a desirable end in order to create a more agile business culture inside your organization.

Autonomous

Company culture that is flexible and adaptive is characterized by the following characteristics: A agile organizational culture is frequently attempted by organizations with a fast-paced working environment. When you have a corporate culture like this, employees are fast to produce new ideas and are prepared to reconsider existing ones. They frequently possess great problem-solving talents that are inspired by their surroundings or their surroundings. Promote the development of new ideas, procedures, and techniques that result in a desired end in order to create a more agile organizational culture.

Progressive

A progressive organizational culture encourages innovation and the development of new ideas. High-growth businesses frequently adopt a progressive corporate culture since it boosts productivity and fosters the development of new ideas. Employees who work for forward-thinking firms have the opportunity to experiment with new ideas, learn new skills, and cooperate with their coworkers. Progressive businesses frequently shift fast from one concept to the next, necessitating the need for staff to be adaptable.

Challenging

Employees have several opportunity to gain new skills and further their professional development in a demanding workplace culture that encourages innovation. Employees may be allowed to cooperate on initiatives that are outside of their job description in order to learn new experiences and move up the corporate ladder more rapidly than they otherwise would. Employers in organizations with a demanding workplace culture frequently recognize and reward individuals who demonstrate innovation, critical thinking, teamwork, and the ability to fulfill tight deadlines.

How to describe the culture of a company

The first step in creating a desired corporate culture is to establish what your existing culture is and what your ideal culture looks like. Identifying your present culture and your ideal culture are both important. Here are some actions you may take to help you convey the culture of a firm more effectively:

1. Consider your core values

Start by taking a look at the key values of your organization. The basic values of an organization frequently serve as the foundation for the company’s culture since they determine how employees respect one another, how much control management has, and how you engage with your customers and clients. In the case of a firm whose key principles are “never stop learning” and “create value for clients,” you would define its culture as inventive, progressive, and customer-centric. The development of a business culture based on your organization’s fundamental values can assist you in encouraging your staff to approach their job in a manner that is compatible with your objectives.

More information may be found at: Examples of Core Values in the Workplace (83 Core Value Examples)

2. Reflect on your mission statement

After that, think about the mission statement of your organization. Your organization’s overarching aim can be identified as a result of this exercise. Then think about what abilities, talents, and values your team can adopt in order to attain this goal as a whole. The goal statement of your organization should guide your description of the existing or ideal culture of your organization. Using the example of a corporation whose goal statement is “to make customers’ everyday lives better,” the company’s culture may be described as welcoming, motivational, and customer-focused.

3. Explore your organizational structure

Because it defines how formal or informal work interactions and communications are conducted, the organizational structure of your firm may have a big influence on the culture of your organization. An organization with a well defined structure may force employees to communicate through established channels, whereas an organization with a more loosely defined structure may enable employees to work independently or cooperate more freely with their coworkers. Example: a fledgling firm with a loose organizational structure that offers regular updates to its whole workforce on finances, quarterly objectives and business strategies may define its culture as inclusive, transparent and linked.

4. Assess the degree of urgency

The degree of urgency relates to the speed with which a corporation takes choices and introduces creative improvements into its operations. Customer demand frequently has an impact on a company’s sense of urgency. It’s important to think about how quickly your team generally responds to changes in the workplace and how long they typically spend on each project they work on. When it comes to organizational culture, firms with a high sense of urgency may characterize it as fast-paced and demanding, whereas organizations with a low sense of urgency may describe it as calm and quality-driven.

5. Determine whether your company is task-orientated or people-orientated

An organization’s sense of urgency relates to the speed with which it takes choices and implements novel solutions. An organization’s sense of urgency is frequently influenced by customer demand. It’s important to think about how quickly your team generally responds to changes in the workplace and how long they typically spend on each project before you make a decision. When it comes to organizational culture, firms with a high sense of urgency may characterize it as fast-paced and demanding, whereas organizations with a low sense of urgency may describe it as calm and quality-driven.

6. Examine your workforce

The degree of urgency relates to the speed with which a corporation takes choices and introduces creative improvements into its operations. Customer demand frequently has an impact on a company’s level of urgency. Consider how quickly your team normally responds to changes in the workplace, as well as the amount of time it takes them to finish a project.

Businesses with a strong sense of urgency may characterize their culture as fast-paced and demanding, whereas organizations with a low sense of urgency may describe their culture as calm and quality-driven.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *