How To Culture Buttermilk

Contents

Homemade Cultured Buttermilk – How to Make Real Buttermilk

Homemade Cultured Buttermilk is going to revolutionize the way you cook and bake forever. It’s really as simple as putting two ingredients in a jar and shaking them up. In addition, having all of that fresh, freshly cultured buttermilk on hand is going to be a dream come true. Continue reading or scrolling to the end for some fantastic ideas on how to make use of your actual buttermilk. A number of my recipes call for homemade buttermilk. And when I say “a lot,” I mean a ton. Buttermilk is used in a number of my baked items.

And what about my dear friend, The Evil Genius?

In order to avoid the loud “EW!” from anybody out there, allow me to note that millions of Southerners and displaced Southerners are currently saying, “Mmmmmmmm!” “Right now, a good tall glass of buttermilk with salt and pepper sounds really delicious.” A friendly reminder: never yuck someone else’s yum.

(You might be interested in reading about my family’s battle with durian.) There is a lot of stuff that we go through.

How to Make Real Buttermilk

The majority of you are probably saying, “Please don’t make me feel bad about myself.” Simply mixing a small amount of vinegar or lemon juice into milk can provide the same results. “What is the point of purchasing buttermilk?” See? I had a feeling someone out there was going to say it. Not so fast, my friend! It’s not the same as the other. For the sake of demonstrating my thesis, I’d like to speak briefly about science. While acidified milk may have the same tangy flavor as buttermilk, it falls far short in terms of texture and viscosity, making it an inferior substitute.

When baking products are made using baking powder or baking soda, the acidity of the powder or baking soda helps to invigorate the leavening agents, which include baking powder, baking soda, and yeast.

Buttermilk includes natural emulsifiers, which enhance the texture and flavor of baked goods while also extending their shelf life after baking.

The acid helps to tenderize the meat while also imparting a tangy taste to it.

Cultured Buttermilk

You’re familiar with the ‘cultured’ portion of cultured buttermilk, right? It’s beneficial to your health. Several active cultures, similar to those found in yogurt, are included therein. The majority of the cultures commonly found in buttermilk are members of the Lactococcus Lactisfamily, which includes several subspecies. Those microorganisms are responsible for the rich and creamy texture of handmade cultured buttermilk. What is it, exactly? Congratulations on your accomplishment! Now that you’ve learned more about buttermilk than you probably ever wanted to know, let’s talk about why you should create your own.

  • Seriously.
  • Okay.
  • Please, hold on a second.
  • Consider a couple of the following suggestions: Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits that are perfect and flaky It is my personal opinion that these buttermilk biscuits would make my Arkansas Grandma very pleased.
  • Muffins with bacon and Swiss cheese These are every bit as delicious as they sound, and they are as simple to make as pie.
  • They’re less difficult to make than pie.
  • Recipe for Grandma’s Buttermilk CornbreadThis is the recipe for my Grandma’s buttermilk cornbread, which is incredibly wonderful and the ultimate in comfort food.
  • This one’s a little further back in the FWF archives than the others.
  • Nothing.
  • Val makes a Garam Masala Depression Cake that is delicious.
  • We’re talking about a rich chocolate cake with a Garam Masala flavoring, topped with orange buttercream and toasted coconut on top.

Oh my goodness. The only thing I have a problem with is the amount of servings Val provided in the recipe. To my eyes, it appears to be a one-person cake. I’d be remiss if I didn’t acknowledge the following individuals.

  • Chocolate Chip Breakfast Cookies (Drop Scones)
  • Extra Crispy Fried Chicken Fingers (The Evil Genius can cook! )
  • Cornbread Salad (The Evil Genius can cook!).

Are you satisfied and hungry at this point? Excellent. Let’s start by making some buttermilk. I assure you it will just take two shakes to do it.

Homemade Cultured Buttermilk

Scroll down to the bottom of this page for a printable version of this recipe! Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons cultured buttermilk (purchased or homemade)
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup sugar (optional). one-to-two quarts skim, one percent, two percent, or whole milk from the grocery store, or raw milk

In addition, the following is required:

  • 1 clean, dry quart or half gallon jar with a two-piece cover that fits tightly

Okay. Ready? The procedure will be lost if you blink too quickly. Fill your clean jar halfway with buttermilk (about 1/4 cup for a quart jar and 1/2 cup for a half gallon jar). Fill the jar to the brim with your basic milk. Shake the jar vigorously for 1 minute after it has been tightly screwed on. In a warm (but not hot) spot away from direct sunshine, place the container. Allow it to sit for 12 to 24 hours, or until it has thickened. When the mixture is thick, place it in the refrigerator. Use within two weeks of receiving the product.

  1. Let me show you what my completed product looks like.
  2. For the culture of my buttermilk, I utilized raw, whole milk.
  3. It’s impossible to go back to store-bought cultured buttermilk or vinegar soured milk after you’ve tried this.
  4. Servings12
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup cultured buttermilk (from a commercial or homemade cultured buttermilk)
  • Milk from the store (or raw milk) in quantities ranging from 1 to 2 quarts of skim 1 percent, 2 percent, or full milk
  • In addition, the following are required: 1 clean, dry quart or half gallon jar with a two-piece tight-fitting cover
  • Okay. Ready? If you blink, you’ll miss the instructions on how to accomplish it. Fill your clean jar halfway with buttermilk (about 1/4 cup for a quart jar and 1/2 cup for a half gallon jar). Fill the jar to the brim with your basic milk. Shake the jar vigorously for 1 minute after it has been tightly screwed on. In a warm (but not hot) spot away from direct sunshine, place the container. Allow it to sit for 12 to 24 hours, or until it has thickened. When the mixture is thick, place it in the refrigerator. Use within two weeks of purchase

If you re-culture this on a regular basis, you will be able to continue re-culturing indefinitely. When I make things like these at home, I always feel like I’m standing up against the establishment. Who doesn’t like the thrill of outwitting the system? This recipe was initially published on March 24, 2010, and it has been updated with new photographs, links, and revised notes as of March 20, 21.

3 Ways To Make Cultured Buttermilk

One gallon of pasteurized milk should be placed in a glass or plastic container. 1 packet of starting culture should be added. Cover the container with a cloth or coffee filter and fasten it with a rubber band, or place a lid on the container and place it in a warm location (70°-77°F). Check your buttermilk after 24 hours to check whether it has solidified. If it hasn’t set yet, give it up to 48 hours and check on it every few hours. Tilt the container slightly to one side. Set buttermilk is when it slides away from the side of the jar in a single mass, rather than running up the side as it should.

Instructions Part Two: Make Buttermilk!

To begin, combine 14 cup of buttermilk from the previous batch with 1 quart of pasteurized milk in a jar and place it in the refrigerator. Alternatively, cover the container with a cloth or coffee filter and fasten it with a rubber band, or place a lid on the container and place it in a warm location (70-77°F) for 12-18 hours. Tilt the jar gently every few hours to determine if the culturing process is complete by checking the label. Once the buttermilk has thickened, cover it tightly with plastic wrap and place it in the refrigerator for at least 6 hours.

When the cultured buttermilk is ready, you can consume it; however, remember to save 1/4 cup for culturing the following batch. To create bigger amounts up to 12 gallon per container, add 1 tablespoon of buttermilk for every cup of milk in the recipe.

DIY Cultured Buttermilk Recipe

Please keep in mind that you can create larger (or smaller) volumes as needed. I get consistent results by using a one-to-one starter to milk ratio of one tablespoon starter to every cup milk. In most cases, unless your culture was not intended to be repeated (some freeze-dried alternatives fall into this category), you may save aside a portion of each batch to use in the following batch. Some recipes recommend pasteurizing your milk (at 180°F) before cultivating it, or at the very least warming it to 76°F before culturing it.

  • 2tablespoonsbuttermilk(store-bought or activated dried starter)
  • 2cupsmilk(whole, 2 percent, or skim, depending on your nutritional needs and preferences)
  • 2tablespoonsbuttermilk(store-bought or activated dried starter)
  • 2tablespoonsbuttermilk(store
  1. Combine the starter and milk in a mason jar or other glass container until fully combined. Allow milk to culture at a warm room temperature (between 70 and 78°F is suggested) out of drafts for 10-24 hours after covering with a coffee filter or piece of cheese cloth (do not tightly seal with a lid). To see if the milk has thickened, tilt the jar slightly back and forth. It should be able to migrate away from the jar’s wall in one continuous mass. If you leave the culturing to continue for an extended period of time, the milk will become more sour, much as when you make yogurt from scratch. Refrigerate for at least six hours to stop the culturing process. Before using, give it a good stir.

This Recipe Appears In

Nutrition Facts(per serving)
128 Calories
5g Fat
12g Carbs
9g Protein

Display the Complete Nutrition Label Hide the entire nutrition label

Nutrition Facts
Servings: 2
Amount per serving
Calories 128
% Daily Value*
Total Fat5g 6%
Saturated Fat 3g 16%
Cholesterol20mg 7%
Sodium144mg 6%
Total Carbohydrate12g 5%
Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
Total Sugars 13g
Protein9g
Vitamin C 1mg 3%
Calcium 311mg 24%
Iron 0mg 0%
Potassium 365mg 8%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Nutrition information is generated using an ingredient database and should be regarded as an educated guess at this time.

More Serious Eats Recipes

Some of the links on this page are affiliate links, which means that if you click on them and make a purchase, I will receive a commission at no additional cost to you. Click here for more information on affiliate links. Regardless, I only include links to things that we use on our farm or that we feel are worthwhile. This straightforward procedure will teach you how to create authentic buttermilk from scratch. I’m referring to real cultured buttermilk, not the buttermilk alternative made with vinegar or lemon juice, which is what many people confuse.

How can you justify spending the time and effort learning how to produce old-fashioned cultured buttermilk when everyone knows that you can manufacture a good buttermilk alternative by mixing ordinary milk with an acidic medium such as apple cider vinegar or lemon juice?

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Why Make Cultured Buttermilk NOT a Buttermilk Substitute?

  • It’s really simple! As in, pour it in, mix it, and then step back and let it do its job
  • You may use your cultured buttermilk to produce other handmade products, such as cheese (which will save you money on cheese starters)
  • You can even use it to make yogurt. Cultured buttermilk aids in the preservation of milk, allowing it to keep longer. Cultured buttermilk is classified as an afermented food, and it has been shown to benefit intestinal health. Real cultured buttermilk improves the texture of baked items that call for buttermilk (if you’re still skeptical, try my handmade flaky buttermilk biscuits prepared with REAL buttermilk and you’ll see what I mean!).

Why Use Buttermilk in Recipes?

Because buttermilk is acidic, it aids in the activation of leavening agents, resulting in baked foods that are light and fluffy, almost airy in texture. Do you notice all of the flaky layers in the biscuits, as well as the golden-brown tips on top of the cookies? Buttermilk! Natural emulsifiers included in buttermilk aid to increase the shelf life of baked goods, which is beneficial for both consumers and businesses. As an added bonus, it gives your baked items a lovely golden-brown hue. Buttermilk can be used in baking recipes that do not expressly call for it, such as those that ask for yogurt or sour cream, instead.

Ingredients

To produce your own homemade buttermilk, you just need two simple ingredients: milk and vinegar.

  • To create this dish, you may use whatever type of milk you want: whole milk, raw milk, skim milk or anything in between. Personally, I love whole milk since it makes it extra creamy and thick
  • Using buttermilk to manufacture buttermilk may seem strange at first, but it is necessary in order to inoculate your first batch of buttermilk with the proper culture. Once you’ve gotten your buttermilk rolling, you may use the buttermilk you already have to carry on creating it in large batches for a long time. It is important to make sure that the buttermilk you purchase from the shop has “live cultures,” else this recipe will not work. You may also use rehydrated buttermilk cultures as an alternative.

How to Make Real Buttermilk

Using whole milk instead of skim milk or anything else in between would work fine for this recipe; however, I prefer whole milk since it produces a richer, creamier texture. Using buttermilk to manufacture buttermilk may seem strange at first, but it is necessary in order to inoculate your first batch of buttermilk with the proper bacteria. As soon as you have a batch of buttermilk flowing, you may use the buttermilk you have on hand to carry on producing it indefinitely.

To make this recipe work, make sure the buttermilk you buy from the grocer has “live cultures” on the label, otherwise it will not work. You may also use rehydrated buttermilk cultures as an alternative method of preparation.

  1. Take little less than two cups of milk and pour it into a clean pint-sized jar
  2. Set aside. 2 tablespoons cultured buttermilk (use 1 tablespoon per cup of milk) should be added. Stir everything together thoroughly. Place a lid on the jar and just screw it down one turn so that it is not completely airtight, but is sufficient to keep out any pests
  3. Allow for 8-12 hours at room temperature before using. You should start to notice bubbles forming on the edges of the jar, and the mixture will thicken as a result. If you like it tangier, you may leave it out until you obtain the right flavor. Place the buttermilk in the refrigerator for 6 hours
  4. It is now ready to be used.

How Long Does Buttermilk Last?

As I indicated in my video, the wonderful thing about buttermilk is that it preserves your milk, allowing it to last far longer than fresh milk. I usually eat up my buttermilk in about two weeks, but it’s always as fresh as the day I bought it. The issue with buttermilk is that it will continue to become tangier the longer it is left to stay in the refrigerator. As a result, it may taste tarter than you desire for a while before it genuinely turns “bad.” If you prefer a moderate flavor, I’d recommend creating a new batch every two weeks to ensure that you always have plenty of this delectable product on hand.

Tips and Tricks

When preparing cultured or fermented foods, it’s important to remember to keep them at least 6 feet apart from other cultured or fermented foods to avoid cross-contamination. This is done in order to prevent cross-contamination between different cultures. Because buttermilk is a mesophilic culture, I want to be cautious about allowing it to come into contact with other cultures such as my sourdough, kombucha, milk kefir, and yogurt. Multiple batches of buttermilk, on the other hand, can be kept in close proximity to one another.

How to Use Buttermilk

When making fluffy buttermilk biscuits or my favoritehoney whole wheat buttermilk sandwich bread, one of my favorite ways to utilize buttermilk is to combine it with honey. These two recipes necessitate keeping buttermilk on hand at all times of the year! Nonetheless, I’m thrilled that buttermilk can be used for cheesemaking, which is something I’m developing for all members of the Pioneering Today Academy as part of a new course. If you are not already a member, we would love to have you come and become one of us!

Other recipes to make use of your precious cultured buttermilk include these delectable buttermilk fried chicken strips, homemade pantry mixes, 1950’s vintage dinner rolls, and peach buttermilk muffins.

Have you tried this recipe yet?

I’d also love to see how you’re using buttermilk into your recipes, so do tag me on social media @melissaknorris.

Cultured Buttermilk

  • Learn how to create real buttermilk and eliminate the need for all of those buttermilk replacements in your life! Cultured buttermilk offers baked goods a light and fluffy texture while also assisting in the production of ideally golden brown baked goods every time. Preparation time: 5 minutes Cultivation Time: 18 hours Total time: 18 hours and 5 minutes CourseDrinks CuisineAmericanServings2cupsCalories158kcal
  • 2 cups milk (whole, skim, or 2%)
  • 2 tablespoons buttermilk, either already cultured, dried cultures, or store-bought
  • Fill a clean pint-size mason jar with just less than 2 cups of milk
  • Set aside. Add 2 tablespoons cultured buttermilk (make sure it says “live cultures” if it’s store-bought) or follow the directions on the package of dehydrated cultures for the amount to use
  • Fill with water to cover, leaving room for it to breathe. Set it in a warm place of your home away from other cultures or ferments
  • Wait a few minutes and then repeat the process. Allow for 8-12 hours of resting time. Once it has reached the desired thickness, transfer it to the refrigerator and allow it to sit for another 6-8 hours. You may now drink or utilize your buttermilk in recipes as you choose
  • Fill a clean pint-size mason jar with just less than 2 cups of milk. Pour in 2 tablespoons cultured buttermilk (make sure it says “live cultures” on the label if it’s store-bought) or follow the directions on the package of dehydrated cultures for the amount
  • Fill with water to cover, leaving room for it to breathe. Set it in a warm spot in your home away from other cultures or ferments. Allow for an 8-12-hour resting period before continuing. It will continue to thicken for another 6-8 hours if placed in the refrigerator after reaching the desired thickness. You may now drink or use your buttermilk in recipes as you choose

Serving:1cup Calories:158kcal Carbohydrates:12g Protein:8g Fat:8g 5 g of saturated fat Cholesterol:26mg Sodium:121mg Potassium:342mg Sugar:13g 420 International Units of Vitamin A Calcium:293mg Iron:1mg Keyword Lactic Acid Bacteria, Cultured Lactic Acid Bacteria, Lactic Acid Bacteria, Lactic Acid Bacteria, Lactic Acid Bacteria

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  • Guide to Fermenting Vegetables
  • Fermentation for Health Benefits
  • Food Preservation
  • Fermentation for Health Benefits Fermented Pickles – A Quick and Easy Old Fashioned Recipe
  • Fermented Pickles
  • How to Make Fermented Dairy and Why You Should Be Doing It Right Now How to Make Thick and Creamy Homemade Yogurt
  • How to Make Thick and Creamy Homemade Yogurt
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  • Rehydrating Sourdough Starter
  • How to Make a Sourdough Starter
  • The Best Sourdough Sandwich Bread for Beginners Without Yeast
  • Recipe for Sourdough Chocolate Bread Made From Scratch Strengthening Your Immune System: 8 Steps to Take Right Now

How To Make Cultured Buttermilk At Home

Because I am an Amazon Associate, I receive money when people make eligible purchases.

Please refer to our disclosure policy for further information. Do you want to know how to produce authentic buttermilk? It’s really simple, and it’s far less expensive than purchasing it from a store. Learn how to manufacture your own cultured buttermilk at home with this quick and simple procedure.

Buttermilk Dressing with Dill

So, there’s buttermilk. It’s very excellent in baked goods. It’s fantastic in salad dressings. As a marinade, it’s just fantastic. In addition, purchasing it from a store is quite pricey. Additionally, if you spend the majority of your shopping at places that do not stock buttermilk, it is really inconvenient. It’s fortunate for you and me that making authentic buttermilk at home is very simple. I came to the conclusion that I needed to do something about the matter a few months ago. However, neither ALDI nor Costco sell buttermilk, which is where I want to conduct the majority of my shopping.

  • At the very least, a quart every week, and maybe a half-gallon.
  • I’m a bit of a buttermilk purist.
  • However, I don’t feel that buttermilk alternatives are usually up to par in terms of quality.
  • Moreover, it does nothing for the flavor of your salad dressing either.
  • You’ll need actual buttermilk for this.

What’s The Difference Between Real Buttermilk And Cultured Buttermilk?

And when I say “genuine buttermilk,” I’m referring to cultured buttermilk. Our best interests (financially and otherwise) do not align with the production of sufficient buttermilk to achieve that level of production. Who in the world would do anything like that these days? Let’s face it, we’re living in the twenty-first century. See what the Food Lover’s Companion has to say about it for more clarification: Buttermilk used to be the liquid that remained after butter was churned in the past. Today, it is produced commercially by infusing specific bacteria into nonfat or low-fat milk, resulting in a slightly thicker texture and acidic flavor that is distinct from regular milk.

For those who are confused by the terminology, I’m referring to the process of making cultured buttermilk at home.

I began experimenting with the process of creating authentic buttermilk at home a few months ago.

How to Make Cultured Buttermilk at Home

When I first started making buttermilk, I used this buttermilk starter to get a fresh batch going. If you purchase this starter, all you have to do is follow the instructions on the packaging. The fact that I was trying to keep my expenses to a minimum meant that I did not invest in a thermos-like container or the Yogotherm. Instead, I used a quart-size canning jar to combine the milk and starter. I covered it with a plastic lid and wrapped it in a couple of beach towels before letting it lay on top of my refrigerator for a few hours.

Voila! Buttermilk! When I crunched the statistics, however, I discovered that it would be impossible to save any money unless I was able to create many batches from the initial starter. As a result, I began experimenting. Here are a few points to consider:

  • In addition to wanting a thicker buttermilk, I like to use whole milk so that I don’t have to boil the milk while cultivating buttermilk from the previous batch. Having tested both methods, I’ve come to the conclusion that overheating it is a phase that may be omitted altogether. After filling the quart jar halfway with ordinary milk, I just add 1/2 cup buttermilk (I just eye-ball it, really) and let it sit for 12 hours before using. Any longer than that may result in curdling. The same thing might happen if you overheat the milk. This curdling, on the other hand, is eliminated by whisking, therefore it is not a major issue. I have not tested this technique with regular grocery store buttermilk, but my research indicates that it is effective
  • As long as the milk is thick and has a distinct buttermilk fragrance, you should be OK. For optimal results, reculture your buttermilk within 7 days of purchase.

I can’t tell you how wonderfully simple it is to complete this task! I’ll sometimes prepare several batches in a row to ensure that we always have some on hand at all times.

Make real buttermilk and use it in these great recipes:

  • Buttermilk Dressing with Dill
  • Delicious Ranch Dressing
  • Homemade Blue Cheese Dressing Recipe
  • Gramma John’s Buttermilk Donuts
  • Buttermilk Cornbread
  • Buttermilk Corn Waffles
  • Flaky Buttermilk Biscuits
  • Grilled Chicken in Buttermilk-Yogurt Marinade

Cultured Buttermilk

You will learn how to produce your own cultured buttermilk at home in this video. Preparation time: 10 minutes 12 hours of resting time Total time: 12 hours and 10 minutes Course:Drinks Cuisine:American The following diet is gluten-free and vegetarian: The recipe yields 1 quart and has 595 calories. The cost is $2.

  • To make the buttermilk and milk, put them in a quart-size canning jar and set aside. Make sure the cap is secure. 12-24 hours should be spent storing the jar in a warm, dark location. I wrap mine in beach towels and hang it above the refrigerator
  • It works well for me. Put the ingredients in the refrigerator until you’re ready to use them
  • In addition to wanting a thicker buttermilk, I like to use whole milk so that I don’t have to boil the milk while cultivating buttermilk from the previous batch. Having tested both methods, I’ve come to the conclusion that overheating it is a phase that may be omitted altogether. After filling the quart jar halfway with ordinary milk, I just add 1/2 cup buttermilk (I just eye-ball it, really) and let it sit for 12 hours before using. Any longer than that may result in curdling. The same thing might happen if you overheat the milk. This curdling, on the other hand, is eliminated by whisking, therefore it is not a major issue. I have not tested this technique with regular grocery store buttermilk, but my research indicates that it is effective
  • As long as the milk is thick and has a distinct buttermilk fragrance, you should be OK. For optimal results, reculture your buttermilk within 7 days of purchase.
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The following are the calories: 595kcal|47g carbohydrate|31g protein|32g fat (18g saturated fat) cholesterol: 99mg sodium 493mg potassium 1289mg sugar: 49g vitamin A 1581IU calcium 1103mg iron 1mg sodium 493mg iron 1mg calcium 1103mg iron 1mg

How to Make Buttermilk

My modest homestead kitchen may not be filled with ballets, operas, or art exhibits, but it is stocked with cultured butter, cultured yogurt, and cultured buttermilk, among other things. Isn’t that what everything comes down to? If you are just getting started in the realm of home dairy, learning how to produce buttermilk is one of the most straightforward tasks you can undertake. And the flavor of real handmade buttermilk is out of this world! To be on the safe side, after you’ve prepared your first batch of homemade buttermilk, you’ll probably never be happy with the store-bought varieties again.

Instead, simply add 1 tablespoon of lemon juice or vinegar to 1 cup of milk and stir thoroughly.

Once you notice little curdles appearing in the milk, it’s time to utilize the milk.

How to Make Buttermilk

First, let’s clear the air: there are two distinct types of buttermilk: plain and flavored.

  • First and foremost, let us clarify that there are two distinct types of buttermilk:

However, although you may use any type of buttermilk to create buttermilk biscuits or buttermilk pancakes, cultured buttermilk is my preferred choice since it is thick and creamy, and it has the most lovely sour scent. The probiotic properties of cultured buttermilk make it a great probiotic basis for dips and salad dressings.

How to Make Buttermilk (Cultured Version)

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  • One of the following: 4 cups full milk (see note below)
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 1 packet of direct-set buttermilk starting culture (find out where to buy buttermilk starter culture)
  • OR 1/8th teaspoon mesophilic starter culture (find out where to buy mesophilic starter culture)
  • OR 1 cup cultured buttermilk purchased from a store*

Using 1 cup of cultured buttermilk as a starter, reduce the amount of whole milk to 3 cups instead of the usual 4. Gently swirl the starter culture into the milk (I use a mason jar for this) and cover the jar with a cloth and rubber band to keep the starter culture warm. It is important not to cover it too firmly with a lid since the culture needs to be able to breathe. To begin, let the milk sit at room temperature for 12-24 hours to culture. When it’s finished, the buttermilk will be thick and have a delightful sour scent that will make your mouth water.

Homemade Buttermilk Notes:

  • The amount of whole milk should be reduced to 3 cups if 1 cup of cultured buttermilk is used as a starter. To make the starting culture, gently swirl it into the milk (I use a mason jar for this) and cover it with a cloth and rubber band to keep it warm. It is important not to cover it too firmly with a lid since the culture need air to thrive. 12-24 hours at room temperature is sufficient time to culture the milk. Buttermilk will be thick and sour when it is finished, and it will smell fantastic. Buttermilk should be stored in the refrigerator after it has been made (it usually lasts at least several weeks for me).
  • In this case, the starting culture was either dead or inactive. It will need to be cultured for a little longer. Your kitchen is unusually chilly
  • This is not typical.
  • The beginning culture had died or had become dormant, and We’ll have to wait a little longer for it to develop. A strangely cool breeze blows through your kitchen

How to Make Sour Cream

  • 4 cups whole milk (read the note below for further information)
  • 1 packet of direct-set buttermilk starting culture (such as this)
  • OR 1/8 th teaspoon mesophilic starter culture (such as this)
  • OR 1 cup cultured buttermilk from the store*
  • *If you are using 1 cup cultured buttermilk as your starter, reduce the amount of whole milk to 3 cups.

Instructions

  1. (See note below for clarification.) 4 cups whole milk Choose ONE of the following: 1 packet of direct-set buttermilk starting culture (such as this)
  2. OR 1/8 teaspoon mesophilic starter culture (such as this)
  3. OR 1 cup cultured buttermilk from the store*. *If using 1 cup cultured buttermilk as your starter, reduce the amount of whole milk to 3 cups.

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Cultured buttermilk is more than simply soured milk used in baking; it is a living organism. It is a probiotic beverage with a taste that is slightly reminiscent to cottage cheese. Because it is made with a mesophilic (room temperature loving) culture, it is really simple to make! DIY buttermilk is an easy and tasty alternative to homemade yogurt and milk kefir, and it can be produced in a pinch.

Types of Buttermilk

Generally speaking, homemade buttermilk may be divided into three categories:

  1. Buttermilk is traditionally the remaining liquid after the churning of butter. It is also known as “buttermilk” in some circles. It has a delicate texture and a subtle sweetness to it. Making homemade butter is a lot of fun and quite simple. Creating soured milk: Many homemade buttermilk recipes call for combining milk with lemon juice or vinegar to produce soured milk that is only suitable for baking purposes. All of the taste that is associated with cultured buttermilk is absent from this product. Lactic acid bacteria cultures are used to make cultured buttermilk, which is typically prepared by fermenting skim milk with the bacterium culture. Not only is it ridiculously simple to make, but it’s also jam-packed with taste and probiotics.

Where to find culture for homemade buttermilk

Finding a suitable culture for generating buttermilk is the most difficult element of the process! Not all buttermilk brands available at supermarket stores have a healthy culture. It’s possible that you’ll have to try a few different products before you discover anything that works. Here are a few things to keep an eye out for:

  • Dairies with a smaller footprint
  • Organic dairies
  • Avoid expiration dates that are too short (you want the freshest culture possible)

Cuinneog was the drink of choice in Ireland, and Avalonbuttermilk is the drink of choice in Canada. Alternative options include purchasing buttermilk culture in a package online.

Saving buttermilk culture

Avalonbuttermilk is what we use in Ireland, whereas Cuinneog is what we use in Canada. Alternative options include purchasing buttermilk culture in a packet on the internet.

  • Buttermilk must be recultured once a week in order to maintain its viability. Alternatively, divide 1/2 cup of buttermilk into pieces and freeze them for future use. It will continue to be active for at least four months.

How To Use Cultured Buttermilk

Adding cultured buttermilk to your diet is a great way to receive your daily dosage of probiotics. It has a milder flavor than yogurt and kefir. Apparently, fermenting lait ribot is more popular in Brittany than milk! Here are a few suggestions for how to use cultured buttermilk:

  • Buttermilk is excellent for adding acidity to baked goods such as soda bread, pancakes, and muffins
  • It may also be served as a mild-flavored yogurt. Heated yogurt-like buttermilk can be made by heating whole milk until it becomes thick, similar to the consistency of yogurt. After that, let it to cool to room temperature before adding the culture mixture. No need to use a yogurt maker because it enjoys temperatures around 72 degrees Fahrenheit (22 degrees Celsius). In addition to using fermented buttermilk in smoothies, we also use it in place of milk on our cereal in the morning. (I’m not even sure my children understand what cereal tastes like when it isn’t made with fermented milk.) When camping or traveling, culturing milk with buttermilk is an excellent technique to keep milk fresh longer. Nothing needs to be kept cool to keep it working properly.

Cultured Buttermilk

By fermenting milk with a buttermilk culture, it is possible to produce buttermilk. Cultured buttermilk is a tasty and probiotic beverage that is easy to make. It’s a wonderful yogurt alternative that’s also great for baking!

  • Recipe yields 2 1/2 cups1 x
  • Category:Beverage
  • Fermentation Method:Fermented
  • Cuisine:Traditional
  • Diet:Vegetarian
  • Preparation time is 5 minutes
  • Cooking time is 5 minutes
  • Yield is 2 1/2 cups1 x
  • 2 cups milk (whole or skim)
  • 1/2 cup cultured buttermilk
  • 2 cups sugar
  1. In a clean glass jar, combine the buttermilk and the milk
  2. Place the lid on the jar and set it aside on the counter for 4-12 hours to ferment (see notes). Temperatures ranging from 68F to 86F are ideal for thickening buttermilk (20C to 30C). Therefore, if it’s colder than that, anticipate it to take a little longer. The buttermilk should be tasted to determine when it is finished. It should have a somewhat sour flavor to it, similar to cottage cheese. Put the ingredients in the refrigerator and use them within 2 weeks.

Notes

  • When making buttermilk for the first time, it may take a bit longer (up to 24 hours) to produce a pleasant flavor. Depending on the quality of your buttermilk culture, it may take longer. The culture should ferment soon once it has been successfully formed
  • If it has not fermented within 24 hours, the culture was not alive and robust. If this occurs, I recommend that you try a new brand of toothpaste. More information about identifying suitable buttermilk cultures may be found in the preceding section. Make buttermilk at least once a week to ensure that the culture remains active. Other alternatives can be found in the preceding section.

Yogurt and kefir are probiotic and cultured dairy products that are simple to make and nutritious.

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Yogurt and kefir are both probiotic and cultured foods that are simple to make and nutritious.

Method One Using Cultured Buttermilk from the Store

Take a jug of raw milk out of the refrigerator and set it aside. A pint would enough unless you want to produce a mesophilic starter for cheese manufacturing, in which case I’d recommend using a half gallon or perhaps more. To make a quart of simple buttermilk or raw milk, add 12 cup of cultured buttermilk to it. Make sure to shake it fully before storing it somewhere cool. Please wait 24 hours. By this point, it should have thickened to a consistency similar to yogurt. If it isn’t, just wait till it is.

To thicken the sauce more quickly the next time, consider increasing the proportion of cultured buttermilk.

Method Two Using a Buttermilk Culture Packet

(You can get Buttermilk Culture Powder here.) Warm your raw milk or buttermilk to a temperature of around 86 degrees. Pour the contents of the culture packet into the heated milk and mix thoroughly. Wait a few minutes for it to rehydrate before stirring it in well to combine the flavors. Warm a fleece blanket over the saucepan (or move them to jars before wrapping them in the blanket) and put aside for approximately a day, or until the sauce has thickened.

Just be sure to save the 12 cup of cultured buttermilk from your previous batch to add to your next batch when you’re running low on cultured buttermilk. Then, just repeat steps four and five!

13 Scratch Made Recipes Featuring Cultured Buttermilk

Ranch Dressing made with buttermilk Biscuits made with buttermilk Milk Cupcakes with honey frosting Making your own Mesophilic Starter Culture for cheesemaking is simple and inexpensive. Strawberry Buttermilk is a delicious treat. Cucumber with Sherbet Soup with Buttermilk Spiced Buttermilk Cake with Pears is a delicious dessert. Buttermilk Roasted Chicken Peach Buttermilk Ice Cream (or try this recipe for Blueberry Buttermilk Ice Cream) Buttermilk Roasted Chicken Pumpkin Buttermilk Pie Pumpkin Buttermilk Pie with Creamy Buttermilk Salad de pommes de terre Pancakes made with buttermilk What is your favorite way to prepare or consume buttermilk?

Buttermilk Starter Culture

This buttermilk culture produces a rich, old-fashioned New England Style Buttermilk that has a distinct flavor. Depending on the thickness you prefer, you can use 1-2 quarts of skim or full milk for each batch. Increase or decrease the setting time and/or temperature can be used to adjust the quantity of character (taste and texture).

Details

This buttermilk culture produces a rich, old-fashioned New England Style Buttermilk that has a distinct flavor and consistency. Depending on the thickness you prefer, you can use 1-2 quarts of skim or whole milk for each batch of batter. Increase or decrease the setting time and/or temperature can be used to alter the amount of character (taste and texture) present.

  • Lactose
  • (LL) Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis
  • (LLC) Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris
  • (LLD) Lactococcus lactis subsp. biovar diacetylactis
  • (LMC) Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris
  • (LLD) Lactococcus lactis subsp. biovar diace
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Storage Keep it in the freezer for up to 2 years before using. Yield Buttermilk may be made from each of the five packets, which will yield 1-2 quarts. Brand New England Cheesemaking Supply Company is a supplier of cheesemaking supplies in New England. Kosher Information On request, a kosher certificate will be provided. Allergens

Yes No Allergens Description Of Components
X Peanuts
X Tree Nuts
X Sesame
X Milk
X Eggs
X Fish
X Crustaceans
X Shellfish
X Soy
X Wheat
X Triticale
X Mustard
X Sulfites

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Buttermilk

Buttermilk is an amusing substance. Many of our favorite foods, such as pancakes and biscuits, begin with the ingredient “buttermilk.” In addition, even if you’re the type of foodie who has a wealth of culinary knowledge and can easily explain the differences between all the different types of butter or is willing to go into detail about what distinguishes cider from apple juice, you may have difficulty articulating what distinguishes buttermilk from other types of milk.

Even if you’re familiar enough with buttermilk to purchase it at the grocery store when Smashed Buttermilk Potato Salad is on the menu, what exactly do you believe buttermilk is if you’re put on the spot?

So what is buttermilk?

Genuine buttermilk may be found in the liquid that remains after churning butter from cultured cream is produced. In contrast, cultured buttermilk (the kind that you can buy at the grocery store) is prepared by mixing a bacteria culture into milk, either whole or low-fat, and boiling the mixture. A fermentation period of roughly 12 hours is then allowed to elapse. Is it possible to manufacture buttermilk? Yes! It is entirely possible to manufacture buttermilk by churning heavy cream into butter.

Enable the combination to sit for about 10 minutes to allow the acid to curdle the milk a little and the mixture to thicken a little more. Afterwards, you’re good to go!

What does buttermilk taste like?

After churning butter from cultured cream, the liquid that remains contains real buttermilk. Cultured buttermilk, on the other hand, is prepared by adding a bacteria culture to milk, which can be either whole or low-fat, and boiling it until it becomes thick and creamy. A fermentation period of around 12 hours is then allowed to elapse after that. What ingredients do I need to prepare buttermilk? Yes! Creating butter from heavy cream is an excellent way to create buttermilk. Pour 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice or vinegar or 1 3/4 teaspoons cream of tartar into 1 cup warm milk if you need a speedy solution.

Afterwards, you’re all set to leave.

What’s the difference between milk and buttermilk?

Cow’s milk is a dairy product that is fresh out of the cow. It is possible to make buttermilk by culturing and fermenting milk products, or by filtering out the liquid that occurs after churning butter, although the process is more time-consuming.

What are the nutritional benefits of buttermilk?

Buttermilk is low in fat and high in protein per cup, making it a healthier alternative to milk. It also has less calories than milk and contains higher levels of calcium, vitamin B12, and potassium. It’s also more easily digested than milk, because to the presence of living cultures (similar to those found in yogurt).

Where do you buy buttermilk?

Powdered Cultured Buttermilk for Cooking and Baking, Cultured Buttermilk for Baking Look for cultured buttermilk in the dairy area of your local grocery store; however, locating “genuine” buttermilk may prove to be more difficult to find. You may manufacture your own buttermilk by culturing cream and churning butter, albeit it will take around 1 gallon of cream to get a half-pint of buttermilk (depending on how much cream you use). If you live near a dairy farm that produces butter, you may be able to purchase buttermilk from them in their dairy case.

How do you store buttermilk?

Make careful to keep the buttermilk refrigerated at all times. Because it has been fermented and cultured, it has a long shelf life, often lasting 1 to 2 weeks after the carton date has passed. A portion of it can also be frozen for up to three months. If you discover that it is thick, chunky, or has obvious mold, it is time to toss it in the trash. Jamie Grill is a chef who specializes in grilled meats and vegetables. Photographs courtesy of Getty Images

How do you use buttermilk?

It is possible to utilize buttermilk in a number of ways, both raw and cooked. It serves as the foundation for ranch dressing, which is the most popular salad dressing in the United States. Additionally, as previously indicated, it may be used to produce exquisitely flaky biscuits and scones.

Buttermilk should be included into the batter for pancakes or waffles. Use it to marinate poultry, dab it into gravy for chicken fried steak, pour it over a chilled cucumber soup, or substitute it for heavy cream in mashed potatoes for a savory twist.

What are some buttermilk substitutes?

A wonderful substitution for buttermilk in both cooked and uncooked dishes, full-fat yogurt is a great option. It has a flavor and consistency that is extremely close to buttermilk, so you should be alright using it in place of buttermilk in a situation. Dorling Kindersley is a children’s book publisher. Photographs courtesy of Getty Images

What else can I make with buttermilk?

When it comes to dishes that are boosted by buttermilk, the sky is truly the limit. However, here are a couple of ourCountry Livingrecipes that include buttermilk as an ingredient:

Put Your Buttermilk to Good Use

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Run Out of Buttermilk? Here Are Substitutes You Can Do in a Flash

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What Does Buttermilk Do?

So, what exactly does buttermilk accomplish? Apart from the sour flavor and creamy texture that buttermilk provides, the acid in buttermilk is the primary reason that a recipe will ask for it. Consequently, to answer your question, buttermilk is quite significant. The acid in buttermilk is a byproduct of the fermentation process and it will activate baking soda or baking powder, resulting in the rise of baked goods such as bread, muffins, and pancakes.Don’t be alarmed, though. There are four different ways to make your own buttermilk at home if you find yourself in a bind and need to salvage your recipe (and your cooking reputation).The Spruce / Catherine SongThe best method for you will depend on what you need it for and how quickly you need it.Using the first two methods described below, you can make your own buttermilk substitute in 10 minutes or less, which is perfect for those life moments when you’re in the midst of something important.Using the third method described below, you can

How to Make Buttermilk With Vinegar or Lemon Juice

This first technique is quite simple to implement. Simply combine one cup of milk with one tablespoon of lemon juice or vinegar and let it to set out at room temperature for approximately ten minutes. If you require more than one cup, simply maintain the same proportions. When making a cup, use two cups of milk together with two teaspoons of lemon juice or vinegar, and so forth. As previously stated, you will not have real cultured buttermilk, but rather acidified buttermilk as a result of this procedure.

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How to Make Buttermilk From Yogurt

Another quick and simple approach is to take 3/4 cup of yogurt or sour cream and thin it down with 1/4 cup of milk, which takes only a few minutes (or even plain water).

The second technique will provide a cup of “buttermilk,” which, like the first, will not be a real buttermilk substitute, but will be a satisfactory substitute in any recipe that asks for buttermilk.

How to Make Cultured Buttermilk

If you aren’t in a rush or are simply intrigued in the procedure, here’s how to produce your own cultured buttermilk from scratch if you don’t mind waiting. Unlike the two procedures discussed above, which merely entail adding an acid to milk and allowing it to curdle, the methods detailed below will provide actual, cultured buttermilk when followed exactly as directed. Be aware, however, that making real cultured buttermilk (as opposed to the store-bought variety) will take around 24 hours and that you will need to start with either an active buttermilk culture or a cup of actual cultured buttermilk.

Instead, you may use this procedure, which is comparable to how one extends sourdough starter, to make extra sourdough starter.

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How to Make Homemade Buttermilk From Store-Bought

If you already have any cultured buttermilk on hand, making your own homemade cultured buttermilk is the quickest and most straightforward method. The steps are as follows:

  1. Pour 3/4 cup (6 ounces) of cultured buttermilk into a very clean glass quart jar and shake vigorously to dissolve the culture. 3 cups of whole milk should be added. Although it does not make a difference if the buttermilk is fresh, it does make a difference since the live buttermilk cultures are more active in freshly made buttermilk. Allow it to sit at room temperature, such as in your kitchen, for 24 hours after you have firmly sealed the jar. The optimal temperature range is between 70 and 77 degrees Fahrenheit. After 24 hours, the buttermilk should have thickened enough to cover the inside of a glass and have a delightful acidic flavor to it. A excellent place to store it is on the top shelf of your refrigerator. Refrigerate to chill or use immediately, and then store in the refrigerator, where it will keep for many weeks at room temperature or chilled. You may repeat the process as many times as you like until you have used up the final 6 to 8 ounces of buttermilk.

The importance of the 4:1 ratio cannot be overstated. Alternatively, you may use one cup of buttermilk and four cups of full milk, but it won’t fit in the same container as the rest of the ingredients. Even if you only have two tablespoons of buttermilk left at the bottom of a carton, you can add four ounces of milk and end up with five ounces of buttermilk, and you can just keep raising it from there by repeating the procedure until you reach your desired quantity. Another option is to purchase one gallon of milk and combine it with one quart of buttermilk to produce five quarts of buttermilk.

However, you’d need to make certain that the buttermilk you use as a beginning is always fresh before proceeding.

How to Make Homemade Buttermilk From Active Culture

The important thing to remember is the 4:1 ratio. You could use one cup of buttermilk and four cups of full milk, but it won’t fit in a quart-sized jar of jam or preserves. Even if you only have two tablespoons of buttermilk left at the bottom of a carton, you can add four ounces of milk and end up with five ounces of buttermilk, and you can just keep raising it from there by repeating the procedure until you reach your desired amount. Alternative: Purchase one gallon of milk and blend it with one quart of buttermilk to produce five quarts of buttermilk.

The advantage of this procedure is that you can keep repeating it indefinitely and, ideally, you will never run out of buttermilk once again. In order to ensure that your starter is constantly fresh, you’d need to make sure that the buttermilk you use is.

Other Common Buttermilk Substitutes

Don’t be concerned if you don’t have any dairy on hand, if you are allergic to dairy, or if you are vegan and prefer not to use dairy but still want the tangy flavor that buttermilk provides and the acidic reaction that occurs with baking powder and/or baking soda, you can substitute apple cider vinegar. However, by replacing coconut milk or soy milk in place of the dairy element, as well as adding a tablespoon of vinegar or lemon juice, you can still make your tasty dish. Simply combine the components in the same manner as you would milk, and allow the concoction to settle for around five minutes before using it.

Buttermilk Equivalents and Measures

1 cup buttermilk 242 grams
1 cup buttermilk 8.5 ounces
1 cup buttermilk 1 cup yogurt
1 cup buttermilk 1 cup milk + 1 tablespoon vinegar or lemon juice
1 cup buttermilk 1 cup milk + 1 3/4 teaspoons cream of tartar
1 cup buttermilk 1 cup water + 4 tablespoons powdered buttermilk
1 cup buttermilk 1/4 cup milk + 3/4 cup yogurt
1 cup buttermilk 1/4 cup milk + 3/4 cup sour cream
1 cup buttermilk 1 cup coconut milk + 1 tablespoon vinegar
1 cup buttermilk 1 cup coconut milk + 1 tablespoon of lemon juice
1 cup buttermilk 1 cup soy milk + 1 tablespoon of vinegar
1 cup buttermilk 1 cup soy milk + 1 tablespoon of lemon juice

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