How Long Does A Strep Culture Take

Contents

Strep Test: Throat Culture (for Parents)

A throat culture, often known as a strep test, is conducted by swabbing the throat to identify the presence of bacteria belonging to the group Astreptococcus, which is the most prevalent cause of strep throat. Additionally, these bacteria are capable of causing additional illnesses, such as scarlet fever, abscesses, and pneumonia. During the test, a sample taken from the back of the neck is placed on a specific plate (culture) that allows bacteria to grow in the laboratory. Chemical tests are used to establish the precise type of illness present.

Illness with Strep throat is a bacterial infection that affects the back of the throat and the tonsils.

It is possible to have white or yellow patches or a coating on the throat and tonsils, as well as swollen lymph nodes on the sides of the neck, in addition to these symptoms.

Headaches, stomachaches, nausea, vomiting, and listlessness are all possible symptoms of the virus.

However, while the symptoms of strep throat can subside within a few days without treatment, doctors will prescribe antibiotics to help avoid the development of linked problems that can be life-threatening, such as rheumatic fever.

Why It’s Done

The use of a throat culture test can aid in the identification of the source of a sore throat. Often, a sore throat is caused by a virus, but a throat culture will determine whether or not it is caused by strep bacteria, which will aid doctors in determining the most appropriate treatment option.

Preparation

Encourage your youngster to remain calm and motionless throughout the operation. It is important to inform the doctor if your kid has recently taken any antibiotics, and you should attempt to prevent your child from using antiseptic mouthwash before the test because this may impact the results.

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A health care provider will instruct your kid to tilt his or her head back and open his or her mouth as wide as possible before doing the examination. A tongue depressor (flat stick) will be used to force the tongue down in order to get a clearer view of the back of the throat. A sample will be collected by softly brushing a clean, soft cotton swab over the back of the throat, over the tonsils, and over any red or painful regions with a clean, soft cotton ball. During the procedure, you may want to keep your child on your lap to keep them from moving around and making it harder for the health expert to acquire a sufficient sample.

What to Expect

The swab may cause some gagging in your youngster if it comes into contact with the back of the throat.

If your child’s throat is irritated, the swabbing procedure may cause some discomfort for a short period of time.

Getting the Results

The results of a throat culture test are usually available in 2 days.

Risks

The results of a throat culture test are usually available in two days.

Helping Your Child

Explaining the exam in a way that your child can comprehend may help to alleviate any anxiety. Encourage your child to relax and remain motionless throughout the examination so that the health expert may thoroughly swab his or her throat and tonsils.

If You Have Questions

If you have any queries concerning the throat culture strep test, you should consult with your physician.

What Is a Throat Culture? When Do I Need One?

When your doctor does a throat culture, he or she is looking for and identifying microorganisms at the back of your mouth that are causing you to become ill.

Why It’s Done

In the event that you or your kid complains of sore throat and your doctor suspects that anything other than a virus is to blame, he or she will most likely order this test. On the basis of a throat culture, it is possible to diagnose the following infections:

  • Strep throat, Scarlet andrheumatic fever, Gonorrhea (gonococcalpharyngitis), Thrush, Diphtheria, and Pertussis are among conditions that can occur.

How It’s Done

You’ll be asked to tilt your head back slightly, open your lips, and utter “Ahhhh” when you’ve completed the task. Your doctor will slide a cotton swab over the tonsil region at the back of your mouth rapidly and softly. They’ll put it in a germ-free container and send it to a laboratory for testing to determine its viability. Doctors then place the sample in a separate container with various substances that encourage bacteria and fungus to thrive and reproduce. The sort of germs that proliferate, if any, will indicate to your doctor what kind of infection you have been diagnosed with.

How It Feels

The test might be a bit unpleasant, but it only lasts a few seconds and is completely harmless. Occasionally, when the doctor swabs your throat, you may experience nausea and vomit. This is typical. However, you will need to remain motionless and keep your lips open in order for them to acquire a decent sample. They may miss certain germs if they do not do so, and you may not receive the proper medication.

How Soon Will I Get Results?

A little discomfort may be experienced during the examination; however, the procedure will be over in minutes. Okay reactions to the doctor’s throat swab include feeling like you have to gag – this is normal. To ensure that they acquire a decent sample, you’ll need to remain motionless and open your mouth. If they do not, they may overlook certain bacteria and you may not receive the proper medication.

What Else Should I Know?

If you or your kid has a sore throat and has to see a doctor, you should avoid using mouthwash before your appointment. It might have an impact on the outcome of your throat culture.

Strep Throat Test

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Strep A Test: MedlinePlus Medical Test

Current Review’s sources were taken from On September 7, 2018, the information was updated. Z. Kahn’s Group A Streptococcal Infections. New York, NY: Springer-Verlag, 1997. Online at As of August 2020, this page was accessed (Thursday, September 28) Throat infection caused by bacteria. Online at As of August 2020, this page was accessed (1st of November, 2018) – Department of Health and Human Services, United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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  • Strep test in a hurry. This test looks for antigens that are specific to strep A. Antigens are chemicals that elicit an immunological response from the body’s immune system. Typically, results from a fast strep test are available in 10–20 minutes. A throat culture may be ordered if the arapid test results are negative, but your clinician believes you or your kid has strep throat
  • Throat culture is a kind of culture taken from the throat. This test checks for the bacterium streptococcus A. However, it takes 24–48 hours to receive findings, whereas a fast test delivers a more accurate diagnosis.

Streptococcal testing in a hurry Antigens for strep A are looked for in this test. A substance known as an antigen is one that causes an immunological reaction in the body. It takes about 10–20 minutes to get the results of a fast strep testing kit. A throat culture may be ordered if the arapid test results are negative, but your practitioner believes you or your kid has strep throat; Throat culture The bacterium strep A is tested for using this method. However, it might take up to 24–48 hours to receive findings, making it less reliable than a quick test.

What is it used for?

A strep throat The most common purpose of a test is to determine if sore throat and other symptoms are caused by strep throat or by a viral illness. Antibiotics are required for the treatment of strep throat in order to avoid complications. Viruses are responsible for the majority of sore throats. Antibiotics are ineffective against viral infections. The majority of the time, viral sore throats go away on their own.

Why do I need a strep A test?

A strep test may be recommended by your health care practitioner. If you or your kid is experiencing signs of strep throat, you should be tested. These are some examples:

  • Throat pain that comes on suddenly and is intense
  • Having trouble swallowing or experiencing pain
  • Fever of 101 degrees or higher
  • Lymph nodes that have swollen

If you or your kid develops a rough, red rash that starts on the face and extends to another region of the body, your healthcare professional may also recommend a strep A test. Scarlet fever is a sort of sickness that might occur a few days after you’ve been infected with strep A. This type of rash is a symptom of scarlet fever. Scarlet fever, like strep throat, is a viral infection that may be treated with medication. Symptoms such as a cough or runny nose, combined with your painful throat, indicate that you may be suffering from a viral infection rather than strep throat, according to the Mayo Clinic.

What happens during a strep A test?

In the same way, a fast test and a throat culture are performed on the same patient. During the operation, the following will occur:

  • Then you’ll be instructed to tilt your head back and open your mouth as wide as you possibly can. When you speak, your health care practitioner will use a tongue depressor to keep your tongue from moving. It will be taken from the back of your throat and tonsils with a special swab by the doctor. The sample may be used to perform a quick strep test at the office of the healthcare professional. Occasionally, the material is submitted to a laboratory for analysis. If required, your physician may request a second sample, which will be sent to a lab for a throat culture to be performed.

Will I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

No special preparations are required for a rapid strep test or a throat culture. The tests are quick and painless.

Are there any risks to the test?

Swab tests provide no danger, however they may cause some pain and/or gagging in some people.

What do the results mean?

It is possible that you or your kid has strep throat or another strep A infection if a fast strep test indicates that you do not have the infection. There will be no need for any more testing. However, if the quick test came back negative but the practitioner believes you or your kid has strep throat, he or she may prescribe a throat culture to confirm the diagnosis. If you or your kid has not already submitted a sample, you will be subjected to another swab test. If the throat culture revealed strep throat or another strep infection, you or your kid may be suffering from the infection.

  1. Your provider will almost certainly prescribe more tests to aid in the diagnosis.
  2. The majority of the time, you will need to take them for ten days.
  3. After taking antibiotics for 24 hours, the vast majority of people are no longer infectious.
  4. Rheumatic fever and other dangerous problems might occur if you stop exercising too soon.

If you have any questions regarding your findings or the results of your kid, you should speak with your health-care practitioner. Understand laboratory testing, reference ranges, and how to interpret data in more detail.

Is there anything else I need to know about a strep A test?

Strep A can cause a variety of illnesses in addition to strep throat. These infections are less prevalent than strep throat, but they are typically more dangerous in their consequences. Toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis, sometimes known as flesh-eating bacteria, are examples of such diseases. There are several different types of strep bacterium. These include strep B, which may cause a potentially life-threatening illness in infants, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, which is the most prevalent cause of pneumonia in the general population.

References

  1. OB/GYN: The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (often known as ACOG). The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists published a new edition in 2019. Pregnancy and Group B Strep Infection
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  7. . Available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Group A Streptococcal Disease: Pharyngitis (Strep Throat) page. Atlanta: United States Department of Health and Human Services. United States Department of Health and Human Services
  8. Group A Streptococcal (GAS) Disease: Rheumatic Fever: Everything You Need to Know
  9. . Available from: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. United States Department of Health and Human Services
  10. Group A Streptococcal (GAS) Disease: Strep Throat: All You Need to Know
  11. . Available from: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Atlanta, Georgia Dr. Choby’s article, “Diagnosis and treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis,” is available from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Streptococcus Laboratory: Streptococcus pneumoniae. Am Fam Physician. 2009 Mar 1
  12. 79(5):383-90. Published online March 1, 2009. This product is available through the Cleveland Clinic. Cleveland (Ohio): Cleveland Clinic, 2019. Print. Overview of Strep Throat. Available from: Children’s Health from Nemours. The Nemours Foundation, Jacksonville, Florida, c1995-2021, issuing body. Obtainable via Health from Nemours. Strep Test: Rapid Availability: The Nemours Foundation, Jacksonville, Florida, c1995-2021, issuing body. Children’s Health from Nemours has a Strep Test: Throat Culture that is available for purchase. The Nemours Foundation, Jacksonville, Florida, c1995-2021, issuing body. Strep Throat
  13. Is available from the following sources: Lab Tests Online. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) publishes this journal from 2001 to 2019. This test is available from the following sources: Mayo Clinic. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
  14. 1998–2019. Strep Throat Test Treatment of Strep Throat
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  17. 1998–2019. Strep Throat: Diagnosis and Treatment
  18. . Accessed on September 28th, 2018 from: Merck Manual Consumer Version. Strep Throat: Symptoms and Causes Health Encyclopedia: Beta Hemolytic Streptococcus Culture (Throat)
  19. . Available from: contentid=beta hemolytic streptococcus culture
  20. University of Rochester Medical Center. Rochester (NY): University of Rochester Medical Center
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Is your sore throat strep?

Are you concerned that your sore throat may be caused by strep throat? Adults are less likely than children to have strep throat, which is a frequent kind of sore throat in youngsters. The presence of strep throat may be determined quickly by doctors using a simple test. If this is the case, medications can help you feel better sooner while also preventing the infection from spreading to others.

Bacteria Cause Strep Throat

When it comes to sore throats, viruses are the most typical culprits. Strep throat, on the other hand, is an infection of the throat and tonsils caused by bacteria belonging to the group AStreptococcus (group A strep).

How You Get Strep Throat

Group A strep infection is a bacterial infection that lives in the nose and throat and can readily transmit to other persons. It is vital to understand that some infected persons may not show any signs of illness or do not appear to be unwell. When infected individuals cough or sneeze, they produce minute respiratory droplets that carry the germs, which transmit the infection. People can become ill if they do any of the following:

  • Droplets should be inhaled, or they should be touched and then their mouth or nose should be touched. Drinking from or eating from the same glass or plate as a sick individual is not recommended. Impetigo is a term used to describe skin lesions produced by group A strep bacteria.

The CDC’s food safety page provides more information on the possibility of spreading group A strep through improperly prepared foods. Experts do not believe that pets or household goods, such as toys, are responsible for the spread of these germs.

Pain and Fever without a Cough Are Common Signs and Symptoms

In most cases, strep throat is a benign illness, but it can be quite painful in some cases. The following are the most prevalent symptoms of strep throat:

  • Throat discomfort that can develop extremely fast
  • When swallowing, there is discomfort. Fever
  • Tonsils that are red and swollen, with white spots or streaks of pus on them at times
  • Petechiae (pronounced pi-TEE-kee-eye) are small, red spots that appear on the roof of the mouth (either the soft or hard palate). Frontal lymph node swelling
  • Swollen lymph nodes in the neck

In addition to these symptoms, particularly in youngsters, a headache, stomach discomfort, nausea, and vomiting may occur. Scleroderma, often known as scarlet fever, can develop in people who have strep throat (also called scarlatina). When the following symptoms are present, it is more likely that a virus is the source of the sickness rather than strep throat:

  • Coughing, runny nose, and other symptoms Changes in your voice that cause it to sound breathy, raspy, or strained
  • Hoarseness Inflammation of the conjunctiva (commonly known as pink eye)

In most cases, it takes two to five days for someone who has been exposed to group A strep to develop symptoms. Some of the most frequent indications and symptoms of strep throat are a painful throat that develops fast, pain while swallowing, and a fever, among other things.

Children and Certain Adults Are at Increased Risk

The chance of developing this common illness can be increased by a number of circumstances, including smoking and drinking alcohol in excess.

Children are more likely than adults to contract strep throat. It is most frequent in youngsters between the ages of 5 and 15 years old. It is quite unusual in children under the age of three. Adults who are at higher risk for strep throat include those who are overweight or obese.

  • Parents of school-aged children
  • Adults who have frequent interaction with children
  • People who work with children

It is the most prevalent risk factor for strep throat to be in close contact with another person who has the infection. For example, if someone has strep throat, it is common for the infection to spread to other members of the family. Infectious diseases have a tendency to spread whenever big groups of people congregate in close proximity. If you live in close quarters, you may be more likely to get group A strep infection. These options are as follows:

  • Schools, daycare centers, and military training facilities are just a few examples.
  • Approximately one in every ten youngsters who complain of a sore throat has strep throat. Approximately one in every ten individuals who gets a sore throat has strep throat.

A Simple Test Gives Fast Results

Only a quick strep test or a throat culture will be able to identify if group A strep is the source of the infection. Taking one peek at someone’s throat will not be enough for a doctor to determine if they have strep. A quick strep test is swabbing the throat and doing a test on the swab once it has been collected. The test can determine whether group A strep is the source of the sickness in a short period of time. If the test results are positive, physicians will be able to recommend antibiotics.

  • It takes time to observe if group A strep bacteria develop from a throat sample during a throat culture.
  • Children and teenagers should be taught about culture because they are at risk of developing rheumatic fever if they do not receive treatment for a strep throat infection.
  • Generally speaking, those who have had a strep throat infection are not at risk of contracting rheumatic fever.
  • If you or your kid do not feel better after taking antibiotics for 48 hours, consult your doctor.

Antibiotics Get You Well Fast

Antibiotics are used to treat strep throat at doctors’ offices. For patients who are not allergic to penicillin, either penicillin or amoxicillin is advised as a first-line antibiotic treatment. People who are allergic to penicillin might have their strep throat treated with different medicines, according to their doctor. Antibiotics provide a number of advantages, including:

  • Reducing the length of time a person is unwell
  • Decreasing symptoms (making a person feel better)
  • Preventing the bacterium from spreading to others
  • Preventing serious problems such as rheumatic fever from occurring

Someone who tests positive for strep throat but does not exhibit any symptoms (referred to as a “carrier”) is unlikely to require antibiotics. They have a lower risk of spreading the bacterium to others and are extremely unlikely to develop problems. In the event that a carrier has a virus-induced sore throat disease, the quick strep test may result in a positive result. It might be difficult to determine what is causing the painful throat in these situations.

If a person continues to develop a sore throat despite taking the appropriate medicines, they may be a strep carrier who is also suffering from a viral throat infection. If you suspect that you or your kid may be a strep carrier, consult with your doctor.

Serious Complications Are Not Common but Can Happen

After a strep throat infection, it is possible to develop complications. A bacterial infection that has spread to other places of the body might result in this. The following are examples of complications:

  • Tonsil abscesses (pus-filled pockets) surrounding the tonsils
  • Lymph nodes in the neck that are swollen
  • Infections of the sinuses
  • Infections of the ears
  • Rheumatic fever (a heart condition)
  • Rheumatic arthritis Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (a kidney condition) is caused by bacteria.
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Protect Yourself and Others

People can contract strep throat more than once in their lives. Being infected with strep throat does not shield a person from contracting it again in the future. While there is currently no vaccination available to prevent strep throat, there are steps people may take to protect themselves and others from contracting the infection. Group A Strep Infections can be prevented with good hygiene. The most effective technique to avoid contracting or spreading group A solution is to wash and soften your hands.

You should do the following in order to maintain healthy hygiene:

  • When you cough or sneeze, use a tissue to cover your mouth and nose to prevent infection. Dispose of your used tissues in the rubbish basket. To avoid contaminating your hands, use your upper sleeve or elbow rather than your hands to cough or sneeze if you don’t have a tissue
  • Hands should be washed often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

You should also wash any glasses, cutlery, or plates that have been used by someone who is unwell after they have been used. Once these goods have been cleaned, they are safe for others to use. Hand washing on a regular basis will assist to prevent germs from spreading. Antibiotics aid in the prevention of the spread of infection to others. People who have strep throat should avoid going to work, school, or childcare until they have recovered from the infection.

  • I’m no longer suffering from a fever. OR have been taking antibiotics for at least 12 hours
  • AND

Follow the directions on the prescription exactly as directed by the doctor. It is important not to stop taking the drug even if you or your kid is feeling better, unless your doctor directs you to do so.

Streptococcal Screen: Purpose, Procedure, and Results

This test, also known as a rapidStreptococcusscreening test or a quick strep screen, is used to evaluate whether or not you have a kind of bacteria known as group AStreptococcus (Streptococci pyogenes) present in your throat. This bacteria causes a throat illness known as streptococcal pharyngitis, which is more popularly known as strep throat in the United States. Especially prevalent in youngsters between the ages of 5 and 15 years, streptococcal infections are a regular occurrence. Contact with contaminated mucus or saliva results in the transmission of the virus.

Other indications and symptoms of a strep infection are as follows:

  • Disturbing swallowing
  • A lack of appetite
  • Cold
  • Fatigue
  • Painful or swollen lymph nodes in the neck

Strep infections can manifest themselves in the form of a pink skin rash that feels like sandpaper in certain circumstances. Because strep throat is less prevalent in adults than in children, your doctor may not recommend a quick strep screening unless you have a severe or recurrent sore throat, a fever, and enlarged lymph nodes in your neck and throat. A fast screen strep test is simple to do and may be completed in the comfort of your doctor’s office. You should avoid using mouthwash before the test since it may cause findings to be distorted or inaccurate.

  1. Your doctor will inspect your mouth to look for indications of infection such as red, swollen regions or other symptoms.
  2. Afterwards, your doctor will use a cotton swab and gently brush it against the back of your throat, which is known as the oropharynx, in order to get a sample for the examination.
  3. The swabs will be examined with a kit to determine whether or not the bacteria belonging to the group AStreptococcusbacterium is present.
  4. If your child is having a quick strep screen, it’s a good idea to hold their arms or have them sit on your lap while the test is being performed.
  5. Additionally, the location of the swab may cause a gag response to be elicited.
  6. Inform your doctor if you are currently taking antibiotics.
  7. If the test results show that you have group AStreptococcus in your throat, you are most likely suffering from an infection.

If you are an adult with a negative test and your doctor does not suspect strep throat based on available clinical evidence, you are most likely not infected with group AStreptococcus, which is the bacteria that caused your throat infection.

Occasionally, if you have symptoms of a strep infection but your test results come back negative, your doctor may recommend that you have a throat culture taken.

A throat culture is similar to a fast screen test, except that the material is processed in greater detail after it has been collected.

Because the swabs are cultured, which means that any bacteria on them is allowed to grow, the findings can take up to 48 hours to get back to the lab.

In addition, it is vital to remember that a quick strep screen test only tests for group AStreptococcus, which is a specific type of bacterium.

The distinction between tonsillitis and strep throat is as follows: The exam is simple and quick to complete.

Your doctor will most likely prescribe antibiotic medication if you test positive for strep, and he or she will also advise you to drink plenty of warm drinks and gargle with salt water.

If a strep infection is not treated promptly, it might progress to more serious medical issues, such as the following:

  • Streptococcal pneumonia, ear infections, meningitis, inflammatory kidney inflammation, and rheumatic fever are all possible complications.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of strep throat, you should see your doctor very once. If you have a strep infection, your doctor can do a streptococcal screen or a throat culture to discover the cause. Then, depending on the sort of illness you have, they can choose the best course of action for you. Treatment and prevention of strep throat «

Strep Throat Test

Determine whether your sore throat is due to strep throat, a bacterial infection caused by the group A streptococcus bacterium (GAS).

When To Get Tested?

The best way to tell if your sore throat is caused by group A streptococcus (GAS) bacteria is to get a throat culture done.

Sample Required?

A health care practitioner holds your tongue down with a tongue depressor before inserting a swab into your mouth and rubbing it against the back of your throat and tonsils. The swab may be used in a doctor’s office or clinic to perform a rapid strep test, or it may be sent to a laboratory for further testing. It is possible to collect a second swab at the same time as the first. This extra sample may be used to perform a throat culture as a follow-up test, when necessary.

Test Preparation Needed?

There is no need to prepare for the test. Antibiotics should only be provided when the test has been completed successfully.

What is being tested?

Strep throat is caused by the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes, commonly known as group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GAS) or group A strep (GAS). It is the most frequent bacterial cause of inflammation and discomfort in the back of the throat and can last for many days (pharyngitis). Some types of strep tests, such as rapid strep tests and throat cultures, are used to detect these bacteria in a sample taken from the back of your throat. While the majority of sore throats are caused by viruses and resolve without treatment within a few days, some people suffer from strep throat, which is a bacterial infection.

Strep infections must be diagnosed and treated as soon as possible with antibiotics since they are very infectious and can lead to serious consequences if left untreated.

  • A person who has strep throat can readily transfer the infection to others if they cough or sneeze and other individuals come into touch with the droplets or mucus. If you touch your face, eyes, or mouth after coming into contact with something that has these droplets on it, you run the risk of spreading the infection. The most effective method of avoiding strep throat is to wash your hands properly and frequently, and to avoid sharing objects such as utensils or cups with others. It is recommended that you wash your hands often while coughing and sneezing, and that you cover the back of your throat with a tissue before swallowing. The failure to detect and treat strep throat can result in complications, which are particularly dangerous in youngsters. Rheumatic fever, which may cause heart damage, and glomerulonephritis, which damages the kidneys, are examples of complications that can arise from the disease. Fortunately, because strep infections are frequently recognized and treated in the United States, severe consequences are rare, although they do occur

A fast strep test and/or a throat culture are used to determine whether group A strep is the source of your symptoms so that your health care practitioner may prescribe the appropriate medicines for treatment. If you have any questions, please contact us.

Common Questions

Using strep testing, you may find out if your painful throat is caused by strep throat, which is an infection of the throat and tonsils caused by group A strep bacteria (GAS).

  • Rapid strep tests—a rapid antigen detection test (RADT) can be performed to identify group A strep proteins in a patient’s bloodstream (antigens). It is common for results to be ready in 10-20 minutes. Tissue samples from the throat may be tested for genetic material from group A strep bacteria in less than 8 minutes using molecular methods. Further testing is not required if the fast test is positive, and treatment with an antibiotic can begin immediately if the findings of the rapid test are positive. After a negative quick strep test, if your healthcare provider still believes you have strep, your healthcare provider may order a throat culture. A culture will almost certainly be performed on children or teenagers in order to confirm the results and prevent missing infections that might lead to significant consequences such as rheumatic fever in the future. An oral throat culture is more sensitive than a fast strep test, but the findings may not be available for 24 to 48 hours.

When is it ordered?

When you have a sore throat and other symptoms that imply strep throat, a health care practitioner will most likely order a strep test to rule out the infection. When youngsters have sore throats or when you have been in close contact with someone who has been diagnosed with strep throat, there is a heightened suspicion of strep throat. The following signs and symptoms indicate that you or your kid should consult a healthcare practitioner and be tested:

  • Inflammatory painful throat that begins rapidly and lasts for longer than a week, or recurring sore throats Fever of 101 degrees Fahrenheit or higher
  • Throat and/or tonsils that are reddened (inflamed) and have white or yellow spots or streaks
  • Tiny red patches on the roof of the mouth near the rear of the mouth
  • When swallowing, there is difficulty or considerable discomfort
  • Headaches and pains all over the body
  • A feeling of nausea or vomiting
  • Tender and/or swollen lymph nodes and/or a tender throat Rash
  • Hoarseness that persists for longer than two weeks. Having blood in your saliva or mucous
  • Excessive drooling in infants and toddlers
  • Examples of dehydration symptoms include extreme thirst, a dry mouth, and reduced urine.

When you exhibit symptoms that are more closely linked with a viral illness, such as the following, testing may not be performed:

What does the test result mean?

  • If you have strep throat, a positive quick strep test indicates that you have the infection. A negative quick test means that you are not likely to have strep throat, according to the CDC. It is possible that a throat culture will be conducted in order to confirm the results if your healthcare professional still suspects strep, particularly in children and teenagers. In the case of group A strep throat, the result of the throat culture indicates the presence of the infection. Any throat culture that is negative indicates that the sore throat is most likely caused by a viral illness that will cure on its own.

How long does antibiotic treatment for strep throat usually last?

The duration of treatment varies from 10 to 14 days, depending on the antibiotic used and the individual. The symptoms of an infection may subside or vanish before you have finished taking all of your antibiotics; nonetheless, you should complete your entire course of therapy by taking all of the tablets that have been prescribed.

How long should I stay away from other people if I have a positive test result?

It is recommended that you finish at least 24 hours of antibiotic treatment before coming into close contact with people.

When can my child go back to school?

Your child should be able to return to school after one full day of therapy and the absence of a substantial fever, in most cases. However, according to a few small studies, children can return to school as soon as 12 hours after receiving their first antibiotic dosage, given that they are no longer feverish and that their symptoms have eased.

If one child in my family has strep throat, is everyone going to get sick?

Other members of the family, including adults, may get infected with the germs. Your health-care practitioner may test any members of your family who have sore throats, including children under the age of three, and may test children under the age of three. In most circumstances, it is not required to test additional members of the family who are not experiencing symptoms.

What can I do to prevent the spread of strep throat?

The best way to prevent the spread of strep throat is to wash your hands often, especially after coughing and sneezing, and before preparing or eating food. If you have a sore throat, you should consult a healthcare practitioner who can do testing to determine if you have strep throat or another infection. If the results of the test suggest that you have strep throat, you should avoid going to work, school, or childcare for at least 24 hours after taking an antibiotic.

I’ve had strep throat before and was treated with antibiotics. Can I get it again?

Yes. However, because there are so many distinct strains of the bacterium, it is doubtful that you will be resistant to all of them. If you have had a past strep infection, antibodies may protect you. It is possible to contract strep throat on a recurring basis. The most effective method of reducing the risk of transmission to others is to avoid close contact with people when unwell and to wash hands often and thoroughly with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand scrub after each interaction.

What is an ASO test and how is it used to detect a strep infection?

This blood test is used to determine if a person has a current or previous infection with group A strep (Streptococcus pyogenes). It is used to identify antibodies to streptolysin O, which is one of the several strep antigens that can be found. When opposed to thirty years ago, this test is now only infrequently requested. The ASO test is not useful in the diagnosis of acute strep throat infection; instead, the quick strep test or throat culture should be performed. It is possible that this test will be useful for a health care practitioner who is seeking to determine whether or not someone has recently had a strep infection that has not yet been detected.

Additionally, it may be utilized to aid in the diagnosis of rheumatic fever or glomerulonephritis, which can arise weeks after a strep throat infection and for which the fast strep test and throat culture would no longer be positive, respectively.

Do other group A strep cause other types of infections?

Yes. Besides infections such as impetigo, group A strep can also cause more dangerous illnesses such as toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis (the so-called “flesh-eating bacterium”) on a rare occasion.

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Are there other types of strep bacteria that can cause a sore throat?

Group C and group G strep, which are generally found in animals, can cause sore throats in people on a rare occasion. These bacteria, on the other hand, do not represent a threat to the major secondary problems associated with group A strep that are linked with group B strep. Group A strep medication will be effective against these microorganisms as well as against group A strep.

Is there anything else I should know?

It is possible that the early symptoms of influenza, such as fever, chills, headache, sore throat, and muscular discomfort, will be mistaken for those of strep throat during the influenza season. A quick strep test and a rapid influenza test may be performed at the same time in order to discriminate between strep and influenza infections. Without antibiotic therapy, the majority of people who have strep throat will eventually recover, but they will remain infectious for a longer amount of time and will be at a higher risk of acquiring secondary issues as a result.

Some schoolchildren may be carriers, meaning they carry the germs but are not showing any signs of illness.

Recent antibiotic medication or gargling with certain mouthwashes may have an impact on the findings of the quick strep test.

View Sources

Sources consulted for the current review (Current as of September 7, 2018) Z. Kahn, Group A Streptococcal Infections. New York, NY: Springer-Verlag. Available on the internet at The date of access is August 2020. (Thursday, September 28th, 2018) Throat infection caused by Strep Throat Available on the internet at The date of access is August 2020. (1st of November, 2018) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. Everything You Need to Know About Strep Throat. Available on the internet at The date of access is August 2020.

  1. Am Fam Physician.
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  3. (Content review completed in October 2017) Streptococcal Disease of the Group A Streptococcal Type Consultation services provided by ARUP Consult®.
  4. (1st of September, 2018) Among those who have contributed to this work are Dithi Banerjee, PhD, and Rangaraj Selvarangan, BVSc, PhD, D(ABMM), FIDSA.
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Davis Company is based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

(2001).

Louis, MO-based Mosby’s Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference 5th Edition is published by Mosby, Inc.

GAS is an acronym for Group A Streptococcal Disease (strep throat, necrotizing fasciitis, impetigo).

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Pharyngitis, according to the American Family Physician.

Pharyngitis is a medical condition that can be treated online.

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Screening for streptococcal infections.

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  • The American Heart Association has updated its recommendations for treating Strep Throat and preventing Rheumatic Fever.
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It’s most likely not strep, but rather a viral infection.

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Infections caused by group A streptococcal bacteria.

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is located in Scarborough, Maine. The month of July, 2015. Medical News from Medscape. (2015). (2015, September 2). Children with Strep Throat who have been treated can return to school in 12 hours. Available on the internet at The website was accessed on September 7, 2015.

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Strep Throat (Bacterial)

Sore throats are caused by two types of germs: viruses and bacteria. Viruses are the most common type of germ. Viruses are responsible for the majority of sore throats. The one that appears abruptly is caused by bacteria (germs) known as “strep,” which is an abbreviation for streptococci (strep toe KAW ki). If left untreated, it can lead to problems and the transmission of the disease to other people. The infection of Strep throat is infectious (can be spread to others). The bacterium that causes strep throat can be found in the nose and throat.

  1. It is therefore possible to contract the germs by inhaling them or by contacting something that has the germs on it (contaminated).
  2. Antibiotic medication must be administered as soon as possible in order to prevent the spread of strep bacteria throughout the body.
  3. Rheumatic fever can produce painful and swollen joints, as well as a special sort of rash and damage to the cardiovascular system.
  4. Strep bacteria can occasionally be found on the mucous membranes of children’s throats without producing an infection.
  5. If your child develops a sore throat and you are aware that he or she is a strep carrier, the doctor will treat it as if it were a virus, rather than an infection.

Symptoms

A child who has strep throat may exhibit any or all of the following symptoms:

  • Throat discomfort, particularly during swallowing
  • Tonsils that are bright red and bloated, occasionally with white spots or streaks of pus
  • The tongue may have a “strawberry” appearance, or there may be little red dots on the back roof of the mouth. Fever
  • Swollen, painful glands in the neck
  • And other symptoms. Headache, irritation, or fussiness are all possible symptoms. Sleeping in for longer periods of time than normal
  • Particularly prevalent in younger children is a lack of appetite, nausea, and vomiting. Anxiety in the stomach (abdomen)
  • A red rash on the body that “feels like sandpaper,” according to the patient. It might emerge anywhere between 12 and 48 hours following the onset of the initial symptoms. Scarlet fever, often known as scarlatina, is a kind of viral infection.

When a youngster complains of a cough, hoarseness, red eyes, and a runny nose, it is possible that they are suffering from a virus, the flu, or another disease rather than strep throat.

Diagnosis

The health care professional will evaluate your kid and look for signs and symptoms of strep throat before administering a strep test. When you swallow, a sample will be obtained from your throat and tested.

In order to remove the tonsils, two cotton-tipped swabs will be swiped across the back of the throat. This should not damage your child, although it may cause him or her to gag. The material will be subjected to one or more tests in the laboratory.

  • Fast-track strep test screening (quick antigen test): The test can take up to half an hour to complete. You will be requested to wait until the findings of the test have been read to you. The result of a “positive” test indicates that your child has strep throat, which is caused by bacteria. The doctor will order an additional test if the fast strep test screen comes back negative and the doctor still suspects strep. The following is the second test to validate the quick strep test: Your kid will not require a second throat swab to be performed for a follow-up test. This sample will be analyzed in another manner in order to corroborate the results of the fast strep test. If the second test results in a positive result, you will be contacted the following day so that your kid may begin receiving antibiotic treatment. A negative test indicates that the sore throat is most likely caused by a virus and that antibiotics are not required.

Carriers of Strep do not need to get their strep tests done more than once. It is possible that doing throat swabs on children who are strep carriers will result in their receiving antibiotics that they do not require.

Treatment with Antibiotics

It is necessary to treat a positive strep test with antibiotic medication within a few days after the result in order to avoid the bacteria from developing issues. Antibiotics are not administered to people who are carriers of strep or who are treating viruses because they are ineffective. Antibiotics can cause a variety of adverse effects, including diarrhea and dermatitis. Antibiotic medication is normally taken orally, but it can also be administered intravenously. Within a day or two, your youngster should notice a difference in his or her health.

Some bacteria can acquire resistance to antibiotics when they are not used properly (for example, when they are taken in excess, when they are missed, or when they are not completed).

They are sometimes unable to be treated at all.

It is likely that another medication will be recommended.

Comfort and Care

  • As recommended by your doctor, treat your child’s fever and throat pain with acetaminophen (such as Tylenol®) or ibuprofen (Advil®, Motrin®) if necessary. Check the label to determine the appropriate dose for your kid. It is not recommended to provide aspirin or anything containing aspirin. Allowing plenty of liquids, such as water, Pedialyte®, apple juice, or popsicles, for your kid can help keep him or her hydrated. Give little quantities of fluids on a regular basis. Soft meals that are simple to swallow, such as applesauce, mashed potatoes, hot porridge, or eggs, should be provided. If your child’s swallowing is painful, he or she may not want to eat much. Offer the following to relieve a sore throat:
  • Warm fluids such as chicken broth or apple juice are recommended for children over the age of one
  • Throat or cough lozenges or throat sprays are recommended for children over the age of four. Check the label to determine the appropriate dose for your kid. Using throat sprays that include benzocaine is not recommended since it may result in a medication response. Gargle with a combination of 12 teaspoon table salt in 8 ounces of warm water if the youngster is over the age of six and is capable of doing so without swallowing. For the following three days, swish and gargle the mixture 2 to 3 times a day as needed. Do not allow your youngster to consume the salt water
  • Instead, instruct him to spit it out.

How to Protect Others

  • Everyone should wash their hands often with soap or hand sanitizer to keep germs at bay. Handwashing is important in preventing the transmission of illness. When coughing or sneezing, keep your mouth closed. Provide your youngster with a paper bag, and instruct him to place his used tissues in the paper bag. A child’s nose and mouth are infectious because of the moisture they produce. Drinking glasses and eating utensils should not be shared. As soon as your child’s sickness is resolved, throw away his or her toothbrush and replace it with a fresh one. In certain cases, bacteria from strep throat may remain on your child’s toothbrush.
  • Keep your child away from other people for the first 24 hours after starting the medication and until he no longer has a fever. Inform the school nurse as well as your kid’s teacher that your child has strep throat if necessary. It is critical for school employees to be aware of this so that other parents may be informed to keep an eye out for signs in their children. If anyone in the family develops a sore throat, he or she should consult a doctor to determine whether or not medical treatment is necessary.

When to Call the Doctor

Your youngster says, “I’m sorry, but I’m not sorry.”

  • Is suffering from a fever higher than 102 degrees Fahrenheit that lasts longer than 2 days after taking an antibiotic
  • Is suffering from a sore throat that persists for more than 3 days after taking an antibiotic
  • Having a rash or experiencing diarrhea after taking antibiotics Starts drooling, becomes unable to speak, or has his or her voice muffled

When to Return to School or Daycare

Until your kid has received antibiotic treatment for 24 hours and is no longer feverish, he or she should be kept at home from school or childcare. Strep Throat – Bacterial (PDF)HH-I-122 11/89, Revised 10/17 1989, Nationwide Children’s Hospital Copyright 1989, National Children’s Hospital

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