How Does Culture Affect Human Development

How culture influences children’s development

The Monkey Business Images courtesy of Shutterstock From instructional toys to government regulations, there is something for everyone. There are a variety of services accessible to parents to assist them in tracking and facilitating their children’s growth, including thorough nursery status reports. There are methods for teaching children to communicate, count, draw, and show respect for others that may be used. However, the society in which they grow up has an unexpectedly large role in how their development takes place.

When it comes to dealing with the world around them, every kid is different.

Depending on their culture, children growing up in diverse environments get different types of inputs.

Language is only one of the numerous ways in which culture has an impact on human development.

  • Furthermore, the substance and focus of what individuals talk about in their talks differs from one culture to the next around the globe.
  • German women are known to place a high value on their children’s wants, wishes, and development as individuals.
  • This might involve the child’s interactions with other individuals as well as the regulations that are in place around such relationships.
  • Syndromeda/Shutterock This early exposure has an impact on the way youngsters pay attention to themselves or to their relationships with others, which helps to shape their self-image and sense of self.
  • Children in Asian, African, Southern European, and South American nations, on the other hand, tend to characterize themselves more frequently in terms of their relationships with others and social duties than in other countries.
  • Because children from various cultures have different ideas about themselves and how they connect to others, they also memorize experiences in a variety of different ways.

The Asian youngsters, on the other hand, were more concerned with the individuals they had met and how they interacted with themselves.

Cultural effects of parenting

The importance of parents in shaping their children’s behavior and thinking habits varies depending on their cultural background and upbringing. Typically, parents are the ones who prepare their children to engage with others in the larger community. Children’s interaction with their parents frequently serves as a template for how to behave among others, with children acquiring a range of socio-cultural standards, expectations, and taboos through their interactions with their parents. For example, young children often adopt a conversational style that is similar to that of their parents – and this is dependent on their cultural background.

  1. Furthermore, they have a tendency to communicate in a reciprocal manner, taking turns speaking.
  2. They frequently participate in talks in a more passive manner.
  3. Children in the Western world are more likely to challenge their parents’ authority.
  4. Parental power and responsibility over children are highly valued in Chinese culture, where parents engage with their children in a more authoritative manner and expect their children to obey their commands.
  5. Chinese immigrant children growing up in England, on the other hand, act more like English children, who are less likely to comply with parental expectations if they are not inclined to do so.

From class to court

The knowledge of cultural differences in children’s thinking, memory, and how they interact with adults is becoming increasingly important as the world becomes more globalized. This knowledge has important practical implications in many fields where it is necessary to understand a child’s psychology. Teachers, for example, may be required to assess pupils who come from a range of cultural backgrounds, which can be challenging. It might be beneficial for a teacher to understand how students from different cultures think and communicate differently in order to effectively interview them as part of an oral academic examination, for example.

Being aware that Chinese children have a tendency to recall details about other people and to be brief in their initial responses to questions may enable the investigator to allow more time for narrative practice in order to prepare the child to answer open-ended questions and prompt them with follow-up questions after they have learned about the person.

They should also be prepared to be tolerant with those who are reluctant to report abuse inside their own families.

This factor may even influence how quickly children accomplish certain developmental milestones, although research on this complex issue is still unclear at this point in time.

Ching -Yu Huang, a psychology lecturer at Bournemouth University and a member of the British Psychological Society The original version of this article appeared on The Conversation. See the source article for more information.

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How culture influences children’s development

There are a variety of tools available to parents to assist them in tracking and facilitating their children’s development, ranging from educational toys to government recommendations to thorough nursery status reports. There are methods for teaching children to communicate, count, draw, and show respect for others that may be used. However, the society in which they grow up has an unexpectedly large role in how their development takes place. Child development is a dynamic, interactive process that takes place throughout time.

  1. The things they ask for and get from others as well as their environment influence how they think and behave.
  2. It is as a result of this that children’s views and behavior vary widely across cultural boundaries.
  3. People’s thinking and reasoning styles are shaped by their languages, according to adult studies.
  4. Beginning as early as infancy, moms of various cultures communicate with their children in a variety of ways.
  5. Mothers of the African tribal tribe Nso, on the other hand, are more concerned with the social milieu in which they live.
  6. Children from the Masai tribe.
  7. When it comes to describing oneself, youngsters in Western European and North American nations are more likely to use phrases such as “I am smart” or a specific skill such as painting.
  8. This includes phrases such as “I am my parents’ child” and “I am an excellent student,” among others.
  9. Using the example of a recent memorable personal experience, European-American preschoolers offered more thorough descriptions, recalled more particular events, and emphasised their preferences, sentiments, and views about it more than Chinese and Korean preschoolers, according to a study.

The Asian youngsters, on the other hand, were more concerned with the individuals they had met and how they interacted with themselves.

Cultural effects of parenting

The importance of parents in shaping their children’s behavior and thinking habits varies depending on their cultural background and upbringing. Typically, parents are the ones who prepare their children to engage with others in the larger community. Children’s interaction with their parents frequently serves as a template for how to behave among others, with children acquiring a range of socio-cultural standards, expectations, and taboos through their interactions with their parents. For example, young children often adopt a conversational style that is similar to that of their parents – and this is dependent on their cultural background.

  1. Furthermore, they have a tendency to communicate in a reciprocal manner, taking turns speaking.
  2. They frequently participate in talks in a more passive manner.
  3. Children in the Western world are more likely to challenge their parents’ authority.
  4. Parental power and responsibility over children are highly valued in Chinese culture, where parents engage with their children in a more authoritative manner and expect their children to obey their commands.
  5. Chinese immigrant children growing up in England, on the other hand, act more like English children, who are less likely to comply with parental expectations if they are not inclined to do so.
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From class to court

The knowledge of cultural differences in children’s thinking, memory, and how they interact with adults is becoming increasingly important as the world becomes more globalized. This knowledge has important practical implications in many fields where it is necessary to understand a child’s psychology. Teachers, for example, may be required to assess pupils who come from a range of cultural backgrounds, which can be challenging. It might be beneficial for a teacher to understand how students from different cultures think and communicate differently in order to effectively interview them as part of an oral academic examination, for example.

Being aware that Chinese children have a tendency to recall details about other people and to be brief in their initial responses to questions may enable the investigator to allow more time for narrative practice in order to prepare the child to answer open-ended questions and prompt them with follow-up questions after they have learned about the person.

They should also be prepared to be tolerant with those who are reluctant to report abuse inside their own families.

This factor may even influence how quickly children accomplish certain developmental milestones, although research on this complex issue is still unclear at this point in time.

Importantly, understanding cultural variations may also assist us in identifying what all children have in common: an insatiable curiosity about the world and a deep affection for the people in their immediate environment.

Culture

Often referred to as a blueprint or guideline shared by a group of people that dictates how to live, culture is defined as follows: The concept of right and wrong, what to aim for, what to eat, how to talk, what is appreciated, as well as what sorts of emotions are appropriate in specific situations, is included in the concept of right and wrong. In addition to instructing us on how to live in a society, culture also permits us to progress since each new generation may profit from the answers discovered and passed down from previous generations.

Culture is acquired via a variety of sources, including parents, schools, churches, the media, friends, and others during the course of a person’s lifetime.

We have a tendency to feel that the behaviors and expectations of our own culture are the correct ones.

Nevertheless, when it prevents the knowledge of cultural behaviors from different civilizations, it becomes an impediment.) Cultural relativism is defined as an awareness for cultural differences as well as the knowledge that cultural activities are best understood from the perspective of the culture in which they occur.

  • This knowledge is very recent, and it is continuously being researched.
  • When comparing development across cultures, the reader should bear this in mind and recognize that there is still a lot that isn’t known about the process.
  • In many places of the globe, one’s identity is decided by one’s family’s social standing or by the rules of society.
  • Consider the cultural reactions to young girls’ menstruation in two very different countries.
  • What kids learn about sexual intercourse, reproduction, and sexually transmitted illnesses is determined by the policy of the school system, which is governed by state and local community norms and attitudes, as well as their own personal preferences.
  • Consider the worry that a shortage of sanitary “towels” or feminine napkins forces many girls across Africa to miss more than a month of school each year during their menstrual cycle due to a lack of sanitary “towels” or feminine napkins.
  • In nations such as Kenya, where the average family earns approximately 54 cents per day, the one-dollar price tag on towels is prohibitively expensive.
  • However, reusable or washable sanitary towels are often used in some parts of Africa; however, in nations such as Kenya, where there is a scarcity of water, this would not be an appropriate alternative.

In cases when towels have been donated and distributed without providing instruction on how to use them, girls have folded them up and used them as tampons, a behavior that has the potential to spread serious disease (Mawathe, 2006).

Exercise

Consider the various ways in which your culture may have influenced your growth. When it comes to exchanges between instructors and students, nurses and patients, or other connections, how may cultural differences have an impact?

How culture influences children’s development

We are civilized people who live in a society that values culture. A propensity in the way we conduct ourselves personally, professionally, and in our general manner of living and interacting with the rest of the world is represented by the term culture. Children, as much as adults, are inherently products of the ‘culture’ to which they are exposed, both at home and in the community. However, in order to truly comprehend the different ways in which ‘culture’ effects and influences a kid, we must explore culture in all of its manifestations and manifestations.

A set of behaviors and a belief system that has developed through time as a consequence of the child’s parents (in a nuclear family) or patriarch/matriarch (in an extended joint family home) setting the tone for the child’s upbringing.

Take, for instance, the following scenario.

That is, of course, a component of the culture at home that is based on conduct.

Once again, if a child comes from a very wealthy business family and witnesses that the elders have cultivated a culture (a proclivity) of constantly discussing money and a strong preference for showing off their wealth, the chances are that the child will adopt a similar “culture” in the future are high (habit).

  • CULTURE OF RELIGION AND COMMUNITY Culture that is generated from the religious beliefs and practices of a single family is not too far off from familial culture in terms of meaning.
  • Similar to this, communities and their distinctive characteristics are included in the cultural exposure and inheritance of a kid.
  • In a similar vein, if a separate community promotes a concept of austerity, it is probable that the philosophy will be passed down to the offspring of that family as well.
  • CULTURE OUTSIDE THE HOME In addition to the type of culture that children are exposed to outside of their home setting, a significant part of what impacts children is the way they are raised.

Having attended a very close-knit residential school myself, one that placed a strong emphasis on extracurricular activities, I can tell you that I am now and will continue to be a person who believes firmly in the merits and power of overall development, and that this philosophy will find its way into every aspect of my life, including the way I conduct myself in professional settings.

  1. My argument is that the sort of value system and ideas that children are exposed to at school and throughout their formative years of learning will surely have a significant influence on how they turn out, whether in a negative or positive way, in their adult lives.
  2. In some form or fashion, whether consciously or subconsciously, even children and later adults who feel that they are global citizens will absorb a culture that has been a part of the location where they were born and raised in some form or manner.
  3. This may be demonstrated with a simple example, without the need to pass judgment on it.
  4. The majority of the time, this is due to a cultural gap between the two nationalities.
  5. Children are exposed to a wide range of concepts from a variety of sources, and what they ultimately practice is a synthesis of all of this absorption and blending.

It is only through our efforts as parents and caretakers that we can ensure that our children are exposed to the “appropriate” form of culture, both at home and in the community! FacebookTwitterLinkedinEmail

Disclaimer

The author’s opinions mentioned above are his or her own.

END OF ARTICLE

Culture impacts experiences and has an impact on the development of youngsters. This issue tries to demonstrate the relationship between child development and culture, as well as the ways in which these influences reveal themselves and the consequences of cultural differences on children from immigrant homes. PDF version of the Synthesis PDF document including the entire topic What Is It’s Importance? As a result of the rise of globalization and the rise of heterogeneous societies, it has become important to investigate the relationship between child development and cultural background.

  1. Children’s experiences are shaped by their cultures, and cross-cultural research aims to understand the methods by which these impacts occur.
  2. The etic framework is the most often used framework, in which a technique used to measure a topic, such as social competence, is thought to be universally applicable across cultures.
  3. Consider the Chinese term “renor patient endurance,” which means “renor patient endurance is used to describe social competency.” It is noticed when youngsters separate themselves from a dispute in order to urge the opponent to display self-control.
  4. It is also possible that this framework may cause disruptions in the spread of local knowledge, practice, and traditions that are employed in the education of children.
  5. Individualism and collectivism are two characteristics of individualism and collectivism that have been used to classify broad cultural movements.
  6. Despite the fact that various dimensions coexist within nations, it is considered that certain cultures are more individualistic than others, and that some cultures are more collectivistic.
  7. What exactly do we know?
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It is through their engagement with or observation of adults engaged in culturally appropriate activities that a child’s learning experiences in a culture without an established education system are developed (e.g., girls learning how to weave from their mothers in the traditional Mayan peasant culture).

  1. It appears that cultural diversity exists in social and emotional development, despite the fact that the majority of the known knowledge originates from research with North-American children.
  2. When this type of play does occur in Eastern cultures, children are more likely to imitate a family member rather than pretending to be a character from a fairy tale.
  3. Compared to their Western-European peers, preschool children from Korea and China tend to be more worried, inhibited, and withdrawn, as well as being less gregarious overall.
  4. These distinctions can be explained by the significance that has been attributed to these behaviors.
  5. In contrast, in Western societies, an inhibited youngster is viewed as hesitant and lacking in social skills.
  6. More Chinese moms feel that their kid should act prosocially in order to comply to group norms (e.g., fitting in) and that self-control should be emphasized as a childrearing technique as compared to European-American mothers, according to the study.
  7. In order to ease this cross-cultural value conflict, the Bridging Cultures Project was established with the goal of teaching teachers to comprehend both cultural orientations and build a bridge between them in the classroom.
  8. When compared to North-American youngsters, school-age children in countries such as Cuba and Korea, where friendships are considered a measure of success, report deeper ties with their peers.
  9. Even while every country has a goal to enhance child development, cultural attitudes regarding which child outcomes should be prioritized differ from one another.

In contrast to the original American television program, which was developed to promote learning of reading and counting, an adapted version in Northern Ireland devotes equal portions of the program to the learning of prosocial actions, and the content of the Israeli Rechov Sumsum emphasizes mutual respect and understanding.

Because of the significance of culture, practitioners and policymakers must be well-versed on the relationship between culture and child development.

Immigrant families should also be made aware of the ways in which differing ideologies can contribute to their child’s difficulty interacting with peers in the new country.

Identifying what works best in a specific setting should be done with care, and it should take into consideration the requirements of the community.

This project, called the Bridging Cultures Project, was created to educate preschool and elementary school teachers about the collectivistic or familistic cultural orientation that children from Latino immigrant families with roots in Mexico or Central America bring with them from home into their school environments.

Educators who have been educated in the Bridging Cultures paradigm have created a variety of approaches that serve to build a bridge between the familistic collectivism of a Latino immigrant family and the individualism of a United States educational institution.

These modifications are also expected to increase the participation of members of the cultural community in the education of their young children as a result of these changes.

They also claim that boosting children’s self-esteem and stressing their strengths rather than their weaknesses might help them learn more effectively.

As a result, early childhood intervention programs should always allow for cultural adaptations and should make it possible for families to seamlessly integrate services into their lives. More information may be found here.

How does culture shape child development?

Children learn which behaviors and temperaments are favored and which are rejected by their society as a result of this exposure. As an example, in certain cultures, independence and self-esteem are highly prized; in other cultures, interdependence and deep ties are highly appreciated. There is a global tendency in that youngsters who are pro-social and non-aggressive are loved and respected by their peers. Early childhood educators should be educated on how to recognize and bridge the differences in cultural orientations among the children in their care.

We must all have a better understanding of how culture influences child development in order to enhance the lives of children while also taking into consideration their cultural origins.

Publications

The Influence of Culture on Early Socio-Emotional Development The Relationship Between Culture and Social Development The Influence of Culture on Early Childhood Learning

Perspective

Thucydides, a Greek historian who lived in the fifth century B.C., compared the self-control and stoicism of Spartans with the more indulgent and freethinking residents of Athens. Today, various civilizations appear to have instilled its own set of behaviors and features. For us developmental psychologists, these distinctions and how they manifest themselves and are passed down from one generation to the next interest us. Our research investigates how a society’s beliefs impact the decisions that parents make — and how this, in turn, shapes the people that their children become.

  • Researchers have discovered that culture might have an impact on one’s personality throughout the previous two decades.
  • People from European cultures, for example, tended to be more extroverted and receptive to new experiences than adults from Asian cultures, according to research.
  • We’ve just discovered that some of these disparities may be traced back to early infancy.
  • Working with colleagues from 14 other nations, we investigated the ways in which broad cultural norms affected how parents raised their children in their homes.

) (Our book, “Toddlers, Parents, and Culture,” was released in November.) This was accomplished principally through the distribution of questionnaires to parents all around the world, in which we asked them to explain their daily routines, hopes for their children, and techniques of punishment.

  1. We also drew on the work of Dutch social psychologist Geert Hofstede, who in the 1970s polled IBM employees all over the world about the elements that contributed to their level of contentment at their place of employment.
  2. For 40 years, parenting methods and child temperament could be seen as manifestations of cultural ideals that were disclosed through employment choices in the 1970s.
  3. Individualism and collectivism are two of the most well-known of these broad cultural ideals, and they are perhaps the most well-known of all.
  4. It is expected of them to seek personal recognition and to improve their own social or financial standing as much as possible.
  5. We discovered that the manner in which parents punish their children is substantially impacted by these societal norms, and that this practice most likely contributes to the transmission of these values from one generation to the next.
  6. According to others, this appears to foster social peace and better equip a youngster to succeed in a collectivist society.
  7. Indeed, we’ve discovered that children growing up in collectivist cultures are more likely than children growing up in individualist civilizations to experience higher degrees of grief, dread, and discomfort.

Others, such as South Korea, Belgium, and Russia, encourage people to exercise restraint when confronted with temptation.

Parents in indulgent societies, in particular, are more likely to emphasize the significance of establishing self-esteem and independence in their children.

When one of their children misbehaves, parents will frequently offer methods in which he or she might make apologies and attempt to heal the harm that has been done.

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However, when children are encouraged to seek quick gratification, they may be more inclined to impulsively seek immediate benefits — such as eating sweets before supper or snatching a toy off the shelf at the shop — before seeking permission.

This may encourage them to be more obedient.

Parents appear to be driven to provide their children with the greatest possible preparation for the world in which they will most likely live, and what works in one culture may not necessarily work well in another.

Over the past 50 years, most countries have become more individualistic, a transition that has been most prominent in countries that have had the highest economic success.

Putnam is a psychologist at Bowdoin College and a member of the American Psychological Association. Gartstein is a psychologist at Washington State University and a member of the American Psychological Association. The original version of this article appeared on theconversation.com.

How Does Culture Affect the Language Development of a Child?

Parents will progressively notice changes in their child’s capacity to speak and express themselves as a result of the acquisition of language skills, which is a normal aspect of their child’s development. It is a topic that many specialists in the health, psychology, and education fields are interested in since it pertains to when and how infants develop language abilities. In particular, researchers are interested in the similarities and variations between children’s cultural experiences and how they are represented in their language development, which is a specialized area of study emphasis.

Similarities in Language Development

According to researcher Beth Maschinot, the more parents talk with children, regardless of their cultural backgrounds, the greater the likelihood that youngsters would develop language skills. The capacity to distinguish speech sounds and to learn language in a sequential manner is another trait that may be present in all children, regardless of their cultural background. The milestones may be attained at various stages in different cultures, despite the fact that the process of learning is the same in all cultures.

Cultural Differences

According to Beverley Otto writing for Education.com, experts have discovered a number of variances between children from different cultures while researching the development of their language. Cultures differ in terms of language usage, as evidenced by the fact that some nations use numerous words in order to express an idea, but others use only one word to describe the same notion in other countries. This is evident from a young age onwards. Later in the book, Otto discusses the various ways in which language is employed pragmatically.

Ethnographic Studies

When people are investigated in their native social and cultural contexts, ethnographic studies have frequently discovered that variables other than culture have the largest influence on language development, which is consistent with previous findings. Erika Hoff conducted research on and contrasted the linguistic development of children in China, the United States, and Europe, among other places. The study’s conclusion was that culture did have an impact on language development in certain areas, however this was primarily due to the fact that views and language were incompatible with one another.

Vygotsky’s Theory

Saul McLeod, writing for Simply Psychology, examines the life and work of Lev Vygotsky, as well as his views. According to Vygotsky’s thesis, although infants are born with the ability to learn language, their development is influenced and moulded by their cultural and social experiences. The culture in which a person grows up will have its own set of values, beliefs, and intellectual adaption skills, which are unique to that culture.

Every one of these factors has an impact on cognitive functioning, which includes language development. As a result of his observations of social interactions, Vygotsky came to the conclusion that language is responsible for the evolution of cognition.

Introduction to child psychology

Children grow up in a specific set of physical, social, cultural, economic, and historical conditions (their socio-cultural context), all of which will have an impact on their development throughout their lives. The socio-cultural milieu in which children grow and develop has been found to have a significant impact on their development. We all know that culture has an impact on how children develop; children can develop in very diverse ways depending on their cultural background (Montgomery, 2008).

Learning and improvement are required for course development, and children can only learn when others are around to assist them, such as parents, instructors and siblings.

Culture and Diversity – Human Development & Family Studies

Diversity is a fundamental component of all communities and organizations on the planet. Scholars with a variety of theoretical views and research interests examine the differences and similarities across groups in terms of developmental and family outcomes in a variety of dimensions. The research focuses on the processes that are associated with group variety and commonality (e.g., culture, social class). Preschoolers’ perceptions and interactions with children who have disabilities, children’s perceptions of conflict in a variety of political settings, and pathways to literacy readiness across culturally, socially, and economically diverse groups are just a few examples of the research areas that are currently being investigated.

Faculty Research

At the heart of Dr. Atkin’s study is the lived experience of a varied range of people, with a special emphasis on Asian Americans and multiracial individuals and families. The Critical Race Theory informs her attempts to better comprehend the impact of institutional racism on the lived realities of racially marginalized communities.

Doran French

Dr. French’s cultural studies has taken him to China, Indonesia, Turkey, and South Korea, among other places. He has conducted extensive research on topics such as culture and friendships, peer interactions, conflict, and social competency. In both Indonesia and Turkey, he has conducted research on Islam and social competence.

Elliot Friedman

Dr. Friedman’s study is to better understand how cultural and social influences influence adult health and biological processes that are connected to health. He has published a number of papers on this topic.

Deborah Nichols

In order to expand his research program, Dr. Nichols has partnered with individuals of a range of culturally and linguistically diverse populations, including people who self-identify as African American, American Indian, or English Language Learners, among others (Spanish speakers from Mexico and Central America, Mandarin and Cantonese speakers from China).

These youngsters reside in big urban areas, rural areas of the Midwest, and on tribal reservations in the southern and southwestern United States, among other places.

Germán Posada

Dr. Posada’s attachment connections study is carried out in a variety of cultural and socioeconomic settings across the world. He has used samples from 14 different nations, as well as samples from middle-class and low-income segments of the population, in his research.

Sara Schmitt

Doctor Schmitt’s study examines cross-cultural diversity in crucial school preparation abilities, notably among children from different cultures, particularly between American and Chinese children. In addition, she investigates discrepancies in school preparation among children who are at risk due to their socio-demographic background.

Rosie Shrout

Couples’ stress perceptions, resource utilization, and experience of relationship and health advantages and repercussions are all investigated by Dr. Shrout throughout developmental stages and sociocultural situations, among other things. Moreover, she is interested in how social issues such as stigma, discrimination, and alienation affect relationships and health outcomes among people who have concealable chronic health disorders.

Zoe Taylor

Couples’ stress perceptions, resource utilization, and experiences of relationship and health advantages and repercussions are all investigated by Dr. Shrout throughout developmental stages and sociocultural situations, among other things. Moreover, she is interested in how social issues such as stigma, discrimination, and alienation influence relationships and health outcomes among people who have concealable chronic health disorders.

Natasha Watkins

Dr. Shrout investigates how couples perceive stress, use their resources, and experience relationship and health advantages and repercussions throughout developmental stages and sociocultural contexts in order to better understand their relationship and health. She is particularly interested in how social variables like as stigma, discrimination, and alienation affect relationships and health outcomes among people who have concealable chronic health illnesses.

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